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Current Herpes News and Events, Herpes News Articles.
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New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. This may lead to the vaccine being tested in human studies. (2019-09-20)

Shingles vaccination of older adults cost-effective in Canada
Vaccinating older adults against shingles in Canada is likely cost-effective, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), and the Shingrix vaccine appears to provide better protection than the Zostavax vaccine. (2019-08-26)

Charcoal-based drug delivery system improves efficacy of common herpes drug
A study led by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that combining acyclovir -- a commonly prescribed topical herpes medication -- with particles of activated carbon improves efficacy of the drug. (2019-08-14)

Can a combination immune therapy reduce genital herpes outbreaks?
New Haven, Conn. -- Yale investigators have shown that the combination of a vaccine and a medicated cream is a promising strategy to dramatically reduce the recurrence of genital herpes. Their study, co-led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, was published in the journal npj Vaccines. (2019-08-01)

BU researcher asks, 'is it time for another contraception revolution?'
In an effort to protect the planet and preserve its natural treasures for future generations, another contraception revolution that provides options for populations not currently being served by modern contraception may be the answer according to a Perspective in this week's New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-07-31)

Old protein, new tricks: UMD connects a protein to antibody immunity for the first time
How can a protein be a major contributor in the development of birth defects, and also hold the potential to provide symptom relief from autoimmune diseases like lupus? In a new paper published in Nature Communications, Zhu and his colleagues are helping to answer this question and uncover the mechanisms that will lead to multi-faceted prevention and treatment. (2019-07-09)

New shingles vaccine reduced occurrence in patients who had stem cell transplantation
The new, nonlive shingles vaccine reduced the occurrence of shingles (herpes zoster) compared with placebo among patients who had undergone stem cell transplantation with their own stem cells. Shingles risk is increased after this type of stem cell transplantation and a vaccine that contains a weakened live strain of the shingles virus isn't recommended for these immunocompromised patients. (2019-07-09)

Oral steroids put patients with inflammatory disease at high risk of infection
Oral steroid use in patients with the inflammatory diseases polymyalgia rheumatica and/or giant cell arteritis significantly increased the risk of infection, and the risk increased with higher doses, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-06-24)

Seeing the doctor? Relax, you'll remember more
Some patients feel shame, anxiety or fear immediately before seeing their doctor, making them tense. But if they can relax and become calm, patients will likely pay attention to and better comprehend health messages, suggests a new University of Michigan study. (2019-06-24)

Chickenpox vaccination lowers risk of pediatric shingles
Kaiser Permanente-led study of more than 6 million children showed routine varicella vaccine considerably lessened likelihood of painful shingles disease. (2019-06-10)

Breakthrough in chronic wasting disease research reveals distinct deer, elk prion strains
Researchers have developed a new gene-targeted approach to study chronic wasting disease in mice, allowing opportunities for research that has not previously existed. (2019-06-10)

New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections
In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King's College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2019-05-17)

Preclinical study: Probiotic-derived molecule may suppress fatal brain inflammation
The existence of certain microorganisms in your gut may bolster the immune system's ability to fend off a herpes viral attack that can cause fatal brain inflammation. Researchers say the findings are the first to suggest that an envelope molecule from a bacterium called Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis) might be useful against viral inflammatory diseases. Called capsular polysaccharide A (PSA), the envelope molecule appears to promote protective, anti-inflammatory responses during a viral infection. (2019-05-14)

Aging baby boomers push sky high incidence of shingles of the eye
More Americans are being diagnosed with eye complications of shingles, but older adults can call the shots on whether they are protected from the painful rash that can cost them their eyesight. (2019-05-02)

Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses
The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. Genital co-infection with both viruses could create opportunities for the viruses to recombine. This ability of the viruses to recombine poses problems for vaccine development, due to the risk of a live vaccine for genital herpes mixing with HSV-1 to form an infectious recombinant. (2019-04-30)

New research reviews the state of vaccine safety science
A new systematic review provides a succinct summary of the scientific evidence for and/or against causal associations for 47 adverse events following immunization (AEFI). Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2019 Meeting. (2019-04-27)

A mother lode of protection
Now research conducted in mice offers new hope that neonatal herpes infections might eventually be avoidable by stimulating an immune response in mothers. (2019-04-18)

Dartmouth researchers offer new insights into how maternal immunity impacts neonatal HSV
Findings from a Dartmouth-led study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, are offering new insights into neonatal herpes, its impact on developing nervous systems, and how newborns can be protected from the disease. In this innovative study, investigators were able to measure not only mortality but also neurological consequences of infection in mice who acquired the virus. (2019-04-10)

Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight -- NASA investigates
Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk on missions to Mars and beyond. (2019-03-15)

Problem drinking linked to HIV, other sexually transmitted infections in Ugandan youth, study finds
Youth living in the slums of Uganda who are infected with both HIV and sexually transmitted infections are more likely to engage in problem drinking, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2019-03-12)

Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections
New research from McGill University has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration. (2019-02-07)

Serum prevents deadly cytomegalovirus infection after stem cell transplantation
In a mouse model, researchers have identified a potential pathway towards creating effective treatments for Cytomegalovirus, a common, yet potentially lethal viral infection for stem cell transplant patients. (2019-01-17)

Herpes viruses and tumors evolved to learn how to manipulate the same ancient RNA
Herpes viral infections use the ancient genetic material found in the human genome to proliferate, mimicking the same process tumors have been found to manipulate, Mount Sinai researchers have shown for the first time. These observations provide further insight about how herpes viruses can manipulate the immune system in ways that may drive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, according to the study, published in Nature Communications in January. (2019-01-14)

Schizophrenia linked with abnormal immune response to Epstein-Barr virus
New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. (2019-01-09)

Painful intercourse in women improved with fibromyalgia drug
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-01-02)

Cancer patients face higher risk for shingles, new vaccines hold promise for prevention
People newly diagnosed with cancer, particularly blood cancers, and those treated with chemotherapy have a greater risk of developing shingles, according to a new study in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings may help guide efforts to prevent the often painful skin condition in cancer patients through the use of new vaccines. (2018-12-13)

Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection
Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study published in Nature Microbiology. (2018-11-12)

Does herpes cause Alzheimer's?
Herpes is the dreaded 'gift that keeps on giving'. But could it also be taking our memories? Decades of research show a striking correlation between Alzheimer's disease risk and infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1) in people carrying a specific gene. Now, newly-available epidemiological data provide a causal link between HSV1 infection and senile dementia -- raising the tantalizing prospect of a simple, effective preventive treatment for one of humanity's costliest disorders. (2018-10-19)

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment. (2018-10-05)

Scientists find a new way to attack herpesviruses
A team of scientists led by Leor S. Weinberger, PhD, the William and Ute Bowes Distinguished Professor and director of the Gladstone-UCSF Center for Cell Circuitry, uncovered the mechanism that allows cytomegalovirus to replicate. Their study, published in the scientific journal PNAS, could open new therapeutic avenues to treat several herpesviruses. (2018-08-28)

Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage
Researchers from Brighton and Sussex Medical School have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue. (2018-08-13)

New study highlights Alzheimer's herpes link, experts say
A new commentary by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Edinburgh on a study by Taiwanese epidemiologists supports the viability of a potential way to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2018-07-12)

Amyloid beta protein protects brain from herpes infection by entrapping viral particles
A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found the mechanism by which amyloid beta -- the protein deposited into plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease -- protects from the effects of herpes viruses commonly found in the brain. (2018-07-05)

Clinical advances in systemic lupus erythematosus
The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate exciting advances for individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The first is a phase II clinical study of a promising oral treatment, baricitinib. The second demonstrates the effective use of shingles vaccine in SLE patients who are particularly prone to this infection. (2018-06-14)

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections. The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily available. (2018-04-24)

Brainy new approaches to autism, chronic pain, concussion and more
Technological advances have ushered in a new era of discovery in neuroscience. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature an array of research findings on the brain and nervous system. The studies shed new light on the intricate circuitry behind our thought processes, feelings and behaviors and offer leads for both high-tech and low-tech treatment approaches. (2018-04-22)

Study: Topical antibiotic triggers unexpected antiviral response
A Yale-led research team made a startling discovery while investigating the effect of bacteria on viral infections. When they applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals, the researchers said. (2018-04-09)

Scientists reveal cryo-electron microscopy structure of a herpesvirus capsid at 3.1 Å
Using a combination of 'block-based' reconstruction and accurate Ewald sphere corrections, the researchers at the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with coworkers reconstructed the 3.1 Å structure of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) B-capsid and built the atomic model, thus expanding the understanding of the assembly mechanism of the capsid. (2018-04-05)

Viral hideout
The ability of the 'cold sore' herpes simplex virus to establish quiet infections and reawaken periodically has long mystified scientists. A new study in mice reveals that a key host protein acts as a critical regulator of the virus's sleep-wake cycle. (2018-03-15)

Why the latest shingles vaccine is more than 90 percent effective
A new study has shown how the body's immune system responds to the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, making it more than 90 percent effective at protecting against the virus. (2018-03-06)

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