Current Hibernation News and Events

Current Hibernation News and Events, Hibernation News Articles.
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Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats
Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big implications for deciding how to safeguard bat populations. (2021-02-04)

European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills North American bats
Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for millions of hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hibernation. (2021-02-03)

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then ''wake up''. (2021-01-20)

Disease threatens to decimate western bats
A four-year study recently published in Ecology and Evolution concludes that the fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, poses a severe threat to many western North American bats. (2021-01-19)

Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation. (2021-01-14)

Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The team reports on its findings in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2021-01-13)

Bats with white-nose syndrome prefer suboptimal habitats despite the consequences
Bats are mistakenly preferring sites where fungal growth is high and therefore their survival is low. (2021-01-08)

Arctic ground squirrels recycle nutrients to endure deep hibernation
By studying the body chemistry of hibernating Arctic ground squirrels, researchers have found that the animals are able to recycle their body's own nutrients to survive during a long, inactive winter. A University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study monitored ground squirrels in a laboratory environment for two years, measuring the almost undetectable flow of nutrients through their hibernating bodies. Researchers found that the animals were able to convert the free nitrogen they were creating into amino acids. (2020-12-07)

240 mammals help us understand the human genome
A large international consortium led by scientists at Uppsala University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has sequenced the genome of 130 mammals and analysed the data together with 110 existing genomes to allow scientist to identify which are the important positions in the DNA. This new information can help both research on disease mutations in humans and how best to preserve endangered species. The study is published in Nature. (2020-11-11)

Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy. (2020-09-29)

Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming
An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research demonstrated that in the common noctule bat, one of the largest European bat species, the colonization of hibernacula progresses from lower to higher latitudes over successive generations of young animals - especially first-year males. Because of their relatively high reproduction rate and the long-distance dispersal of male juveniles, it is probably relatively easy for common noctules to adjust to global warming. (2020-09-23)

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism. (2020-09-17)

Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
University of Washington scientists report evidence of a hibernation-like state in Lystrosaurus, an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. The fossils are the oldest evidence of a hibernation-like state in a vertebrate, and indicate that torpor -- a general term for hibernation and similar states in which animals temporarily lower their metabolic rate to get through a tough season -- arose in vertebrates even before mammals and dinosaurs evolved. (2020-08-27)

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. (2020-08-27)

Invasive hedgehogs and ferrets habituate to and categorize smells
A new study published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications examines how invasive mammalian predators both habituate to and generalize avian prey cues. (2020-07-15)

Hibernation in mice: Are humans next?
University of Tsukuba and RIKEN researchers identified cells in the brain that can induce a hibernation-like state in mice or rats, species that do not naturally hibernate. In this state, oxygen consumption, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration were all lowered, and animals spontaneously recovered without any tissue damage. Inducing this state in humans could have several medical benefits, especially for buying time in emergency medical situations and extending the life of organs for transplant. (2020-06-12)

Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state. By better understanding these processes in mice and other animal models, the authors envision the possibility of one day working toward inducing torpor in humans. (2020-06-11)

Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals. (2020-05-06)

Improving immunotherapy for cancer
One of the reasons why cancer develops is because regulatory cells inhibit the body's immune defense. Researchers under the helm of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered a mechanism for identifying regulatory cells in tumor tissue that suppress an immune response. Their findings may contribute to improving diagnosis and immunotherapy of cancer. (2020-04-29)

Shining light on sleeping cataclysmic binaries
Almost 35 years ago, scientists made the then-radical proposal that colossal hydrogen bombs called novae go through a very long-term life cycle after erupting, fading to obscurity for hundreds of thousands of years and then building up to become full-fledged novae once more. A new study confirms that the novae we observe flashing throughout the universe represent just a few percent of these cataclysmic variables, as they are known, with the rest ''hiding'' in hibernation. (2020-03-24)

Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides. (2020-02-27)

Targeting hibernating breast cancer cells in the lung could reduce secondary cancers
Healthy lung cells support the survival of breast cancer cells, allowing them to hibernate in the lung before forming secondary tumors, according to new research, conducted in mice, from the Crick. The findings could help the development of new treatments that interfere with this behavior, reducing the number of secondary cancers. (2020-02-24)

First genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a devastating fungal disease
A new study from University of Michigan biologists presents the first genetic evidence of resistance in some bats to white-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease that has decimated some North American bat populations. (2020-02-20)

Light at the end of the tunnel for most individuals with low-vision
Progress in research and technology is giving rise to an optimistic future for compensation and restoration of low vision, according to research in a special issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, published by IOS Press. Seven studies explore different aspects of vision loss after damage to the retina, optic nerve or brain due to diseases such as glaucoma or optic neuropathy. Remarkable progress is being made to treat conditions of partial blindness that have previously been considered irreversible. (2020-01-22)

Scientists hope to defeat infections after discovering bacterial espionage
University of Tartu scientists hope create a solution for chronic infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment after having discovered mechanisms for listening in on sleeping bacteria. (2020-01-14)

Learning from the bears
Grizzly bears spend many months in hibernation, but their muscles do not suffer from the lack of movement. In the journal 'Scientific Reports', a team led by MDC researcher Michael Gotthardt reports on how they manage to do this. The grizzly bears' strategy could help prevent muscle atrophy in humans as well. (2019-12-30)

Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey. (2019-12-19)

Hibernating mammals arouse hope for genetic solutions to obesity, metabolic diseases
Hibernation is one of nature's strangest quirks, inducing bears and other mammals to pack on massive weight -- amounts that would be unhealthy for humans -- so they can survive months of slumber. Yet when these animals reemerge, they are as fit as ever. Now University of Utah Health scientists say they have detected new genetic clues about this phenomenon that could lead to better understanding and treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders that afflict millions worldwide. (2019-11-26)

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies
Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. 'Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees.' (2019-11-20)

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. (2019-11-19)

Solution of the high-resolution crystal structure of stress proteins from Staphylococcus
One of the main factors favoring a microorganism's survival in extreme conditions is preserving ribosomes -- a macromolecular complex comprising RNA and proteins (2019-11-06)

WSU grizzly research reveals remarkable genetic regulation during hibernation
New RNA sequencing-based genetic research conducted at Washington State University's Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center shows grizzlies express a larger number of genes in preparation for, and during hibernation to cope with such stressors, than do any other species studied. (2019-09-18)

Mosquitoes push northern limits with time-capsule eggs to survive winters
Invasive mosquitoes at the northern limit of their current range are surviving conditions that are colder than those in their native territory. This new evidence of rapid local adaptation could have implications for efforts to control the spread of this invasive species. (2019-08-21)

Climate is changing faster than animal adaptation
An international team of scientists reviewed more than 10,000 published climate change studies and has reached a sobering conclusion. Birds and other animals cannot adapt fast enough to keep pace with climate change, throwing species survival in doubt. (2019-08-20)

Species aren't adapting fast enough to cope with climate change, according to new study
Many species are adapting to climate change, but those adaptations aren't occurring fast enough to guarantee their long-term survival, according to a recent study that analyzed 10,000 published scientific papers. An Iowa State University biologist contributed to the international research team. (2019-08-01)

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)

Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability
Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study on the alpine marmot. (2019-05-20)

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them. (2019-05-01)

Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease
A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times. (2019-05-01)

Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change
A new study conducted by scientists at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and the California Academy of Sciences revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following a bleaching event. (2019-04-23)

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