Current Higgs Boson News and Events

Current Higgs Boson News and Events, Higgs Boson News Articles.
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Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

The quantum advantage: a novel demonstration
Scientists have just proved that a quantum machine can perform a given verification task in seconds when the same exercise would take a time equivalent to the age of the universe for a conventional computer. For this demonstration, they combined a complex interactive algorithm that solves a certain type of mathematical problem with limited information and a simple experimental photonics system that can be made in all advanced photonics laboratories. (2021-02-08)

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension
Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The central element is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, the scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally. They have now overcome this problem in a publication in the current issue of the European Physical Journal C. (2021-02-01)

Light-controlled Higgs modes found in superconductors; potential sensor, computing uses
Iowa State University's Jigang Wang and a team of researchers have discovered a short-lived form of the famous Higgs boson -- subject of a groundbreaking search at the Large Hadron Collider -- within an iron-based superconductor. This Higgs mode can be accessed and controlled by laser light flashing on the superconductor at trillions of pulses per second. (2021-01-19)

Rice model offers help for new hips
Rice University engineers design a computational model that will ultimately serve as the engine to predict how long a hip implant could last for a specific patient. The unique model incorporates fluid dynamics and the physics of implant wear and aims to streamline trial-and-error in the design of future implants. (2021-01-11)

Quantum interference in time
Bosons--especially photons--have a natural tendency to clump together. In 1987, three physicists conducted a remarkable experiment demonstrating this clustering property, known as the Hong-Ou- Mandel effect. Recently, researchers at ULB's Centre for Quantum Information and Communication, have identified another way in which photons manifest their propensity to stick together. This research has just been published in PNAS (2020-12-14)

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universit├Ąt Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors. They propose to drive these superconducting materials into a time crystalline state by inducing Higgs excitations via light. The work is reported in the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-11-12)

Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests. (2020-10-21)

Big answers from tiny particles
A team of physicists led by Kanazawa University demonstrate a theoretical mechanism that would explain the tiny value for the mass of neutrinos and point out that key operators of the mechanism can be probed by current and future experiments. This work may provide a breakthrough for big philosophical quandaries, including why matter exists. (2020-09-14)

Shining a light on disordered and fractal systems
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba investigated the acoustic properties of disordered lysozyme proteins by using terahertz spectroscopy. They found that the fractal nature of the proteins is responsible for its unusually large vibrations at low frequencies, which may lead to a better theory for disordered materials. (2020-09-14)

New, pharmacologically available STING agonists promote antitumor immunity in mice
In a pair of studies, researchers report the discovery and molecular pharmacology of stable, synthetic STING (stimulator of interferon genes) agonists that induce anticancer immune responses in mice. (2020-08-20)

Probing the properties of magnetic quasi-particles
Researchers have for the first time measured a fundamental property of magnets called magnon polarisation -- and in the process, are making progress towards building low-energy devices. (2020-07-28)

Through the nanoscale looking glass -- determining boson peak frequency in ultra-thin alumina
'Mysterious' vibrational properties of nanoscale glasses studied by subjecting novel (and slightly explosive) particles of aluminium wrapped in a thin alumina skin to neutron spectroscopy measurement at ANSTO. Experimental/theory collaboration shows lattice vibrations in ultra-thin alumina glass result in a characteristic peak in the density of states at 2.5 meV. The boson peak frequency measured by neutron spectroscopy is in agreement with the values calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. (2020-07-20)

K-State study first to show SARS-CoV-2 is not transmitted by mosquitoes
A new study by Kansas State University researchers is the first to confirm that SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, cannot be transmitted to people by mosquitoes. (2020-07-17)

Learning more about particle collisions with machine learning
A team of Argonne scientists has devised a machine learning algorithm that calculates, with low computational time, how the ATLAS detector in the Large Hadron Collider would respond to the ten times more data expected with a planned upgrade in 2027. (2020-07-08)

K-State infectious disease scientist offers road map for future COVID-19 research
A Kansas State University infectious disease scientist and collaborators are offering a possible research road map to find the answers to COVID-19 questions. (2020-05-14)

Genes of high temperature superconductivity expressed in 3D materials
High temperature superconductors, in particular, those transition metal based ones, host quasi-two dimensional lattice structures. Following the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of unconventional high temperature superconductors, the authors studied a theoretical model and discussed the possibility to realize 'genes of high temperature superconductors' in a cubic three dimensional lattice, and published in SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy. (2020-05-13)

Understanding the impact of COVID-19 in pets and livestock
A new paper identifies the critical need for research on the ability of the COVID-19 virus to infect certain animal species, the transmissibility of infection between humans and those animals, and the impact infection could have on food security and the economy. (2020-05-08)

A closer look at superconductors
From sustainable energy to quantum computers: high-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies. Despite intensive research, however, we still lack the necessary understanding to develop these complex materials for widespread application. ''Higgs spectroscopy'' could bring about a watershed: It reveals the dynamics of paired electrons in superconductors. A team centered around Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF) presents the new measuring method in Nature Communications (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-15613-1). (2020-05-07)

In search of the Z boson
At the Japanese High-energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, in Tsukuba, about 50 kilometers north of Tokyo, the Belle II experiment has been in operation for about one year now. An international team of researchers also from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is searching for exotic particles that are to enhance our understanding of dark matter in the universe. For one of these particles, the so-called Z boson, mass and coupling strengths have now been limited with previously unattainable accuracy. (2020-04-16)

Belle II yields first results in search of the Z' boson
The Belle II experiment started about one year ago. Physical Review Letters has now published the initial results of the detector. The work deals with a new particle in the context of dark matter, which accounts for about 25 percent of the universe. (2020-04-08)

APS tip sheet: First results from the Belle II experiment
The Belle II experiment reports its first measurements. (2020-04-06)

New laser technique will allow more powerful -- and smaller -- particle accelerators
Scientists at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics outline a method to shape intense laser light in a way that accelerates electrons to record energies in very short distances. With such a technology, scientists could perform tabletop experiments to probe the Higgs boson or explore the existence of extra dimensions and the particles that make up our universe. (2020-04-03)

Scientists shed light on mystery of dark matter
Nuclear physicists at the University of York are putting forward a new candidate for dark matter -- a particle they recently discovered called the d-star hexaquark. (2020-03-03)

Physics tool helps track cancer cell diversity
A Cornell-led team took a novel, interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the behavior of breast tumor cells by employing a statistical modeling technique more commonly used in physics and economics. The team was able to demonstrate how the diversity, or heterogeneity, of cancer cells can be influenced by their chemical environment -- namely, by interactions with a specific protein, which leads to tumor growth. (2020-02-20)

Physics shows that imperfections make perfect
For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated that certain systems with interacting entities can synchronize only if the entities within the system are different from one another. (2020-01-20)

Matthias Schott receives ERC Consolidator Grant for new approach to search for axions
Matthias Schott and his team are proposing a detailed research program using the LHC's ATLAS Experiment where they can undertake a targeted search for relatively heavy ALPs, which, once found, could solve the problem associated with the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. (2019-12-10)

Research reveals new state of matter: a Cooper pair metal
In a finding that reveals an entirely new state of matter, research published in the journal Science shows that Cooper pairs, electron duos that enable superconductivity, can also conduct electricity like normal metals do. (2019-11-14)

Putting the 'bang' in the Big Bang
Physicists at MIT, Kenyon College, and elsewhere have simulated in detail an intermediary phase of the early universe that may have bridged cosmic inflation with the Big Bang. This phase, known as ''reheating,'' occurred at the end of cosmic inflation and involved processes that wrestled inflation's cold, uniform matter into the ultrahot, complex soup that was in place at the start of the Big Bang. (2019-10-25)

Spinning lightwaves on a one-way street
Researchers at Purdue University have created a quantum spin wave for light. This can be a carrier of information for future nanotechnologies but with a unique twist: they only flow in one direction. (2019-08-19)

Dark matter may be older than the big bang, study suggests
Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but a new Johns Hopkins University study now suggests that dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang. (2019-08-07)

Seeking new physics, scientists borrow from social networks
An MIT-developed technique that draws inspiration from social networks can automatically spot anomalous particle smashups, which may point to new types of physics beyond the Standard Model. (2019-07-29)

Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum chromodynamics simulations
A study by Marco Ce, a physicist based at the Helmholtz-Institut Mainz in Germany, and recently published in EPJ Plus describes a new technique for simulating particle ensembles that are 'large' (at least by the standards of particle physics). The technique improves the signal-to-noise ratio and thus the precision of the simulation; crucially, it can also be used to model ensembles of baryons: a category of elementary particles that includes the protons and neutrons that make up atomic nuclei. (2019-07-18)

Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. (2019-07-02)

The physical limit of quantum optics resolves a mystery of computational complexity
Recently, Prof. Man-Hong Yung, associate professor of SUSTech and his colleagues published a paper 'Universal bound on sampling bosons in linear optics and its computational implications' in National Science Review (NSR), offering a complete solution to the open problem posed by Prof. Scott Aaronson in 2012--apart from sampling problems, can one exploit linear optics to achieve quantum supremacy in terms of decision problems with a YES/NO answer? (2019-06-04)

The discovery of acoustic spin
Recently, Chengzhi Shi (now at Georgia Tech), Rongkuo Zhao, Sui Yang, Yuan Wang, and Xiang Zhang from the University of California, Berkeley and Long Yang, Hong Chen, and Jie Ren from Tongji University discover and experimentally observe the existence of acoustic spin in airborne sound waves. (2019-05-28)

Turbulences theory closer high-energy physics than previously thought
A new research paper finds the high-energy physics concept of 'un-naturalness' may be applicable to the study of turbulence or that of strongly correlated systems of elementary particles. (2019-04-02)

Cornell model helps dairy farms reduce nitrogen, save money
The Chesapeake Bay -- about 235 miles down the Susquehanna River from New York's Southern Tier -- and other waterways might grow cleaner, thanks to new updates and improvements in a Cornell dairy nutrition model. (2019-03-28)

Why are you and I and everything else here?
We're here because there's more matter than antimatter in the universe. An article in Physical Review Letters explores the puzzle of the baryon asymmetry, one of the biggest unsolved problems in physics. (2019-02-01)

International team of physicists continues search for new physics
Researchers thought they might have finally uncovered evidence of new physics, which could be a sign of dark matter particles, but a recent improvement of the measurement by the CMS collaboration produced results that are nearly consistent with the expectations of the standard model. (2019-01-30)

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