Current High Altitude News and Events

Current High Altitude News and Events, High Altitude News Articles.
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The vertical evolution of volatile organic compounds vary between winter and summer
Scientists have discovered that pollution concentration varies between seasons. A new study, conducted in the North China Plain, determined where volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are distributed within the vertical layers of the atmosphere, and found notable changes from winter to summer. (2021-02-15)

Epigenetic mechanisms allow native Peruvians to thrive at high altitudes
Scientists reveal the epigenetic mechanisms that enable humans to survive at extremely high altitudes in the Andes (2021-02-15)

Bats on the rise
Bats carried aloft to almost 2,000 metres by air currents (2021-02-09)

Fast-flying bats rely on late-night updrafts to reach great heights
Although scientists knew that some bats could reach heights of over 1,600 meters (or approximately one mile) above the ground during flight, they didn't understand how they managed to do it without the benefit of thermals that aren't typically available to them during their nighttime forays. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 4th have uncovered the bats' secret to high-flying. (2021-02-04)

Pneumolysis: High altitude specialists explain lung destruction caused by COVID-19
According to the scientific paper, COVID-19's hypoxemia (low oxygen tension in the blood) can hardly be handled by ventilators and should not be considered as pneumonia or treated as a SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). (2020-12-21)

Geology: Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-17)

New permafrost thermal stability map better describes the permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau
A permafrost thermal stability map derived from the predicted mean annual ground temperature (MAGT) by integrating multi-remotely sensed indexes and in situ mean annual ground temperature from 237 boreholes on the Tibetan Plateau by using a machine learning model. This map can be used for engineering planning and design, ecosystem management, and evaluation of the permafrost change in the future on the Third Pole as a baseline. (2020-12-15)

Aurora-chasing citizen scientists help discover a new feature of STEVE
A new finding about the formation of streaks within the aurora-like STEVE phenomenon brings scientists one step closer to solving the mystery. (2020-11-13)

Two studies expand insights into Denisovan ancestry and population history in East Asia
In a pair of studies, researchers provide evidence that expands our understanding of modern humans in eastern Asia and their interactions with their most elusive cousins, the Denisovans. (2020-10-29)

New Denisovan DNA expands diversity, history of species
Ancient Denisovan mitochondrial DNA has been recovered in sediments from Baishiya Karst Cave, a limestone cave at the northeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau, 3280 meters above sea level and adds more evidence to the record that Denisovans, a group of extinct hominins that diverged from Neanderthals about 400,000 years ago, may have more widely inhabited northeast central Asia. (2020-10-29)

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Nangka post-landfall
Tropical Storm Nangka made landfall south of Haiphong, Vietnam and began to weaken. NASA's Aqua satellite revealed wind shear was affecting the storm as it continued to push inland. (2020-10-15)

The mountains of Pluto are snowcapped, but not for the same reasons as on Earth
In 2015, the New Horizons space probe discovered spectacular snowcapped mountains on Pluto, which are strikingly similar to mountains on Earth. Such a landscape had never before been observed elsewhere in the Solar System. An international team led by CNRS scientists determined that the methane snow could only appear at the peaks of Pluto's mountains high enough to reach this enriched zone that the air contains enough methane for it to condense. (2020-10-13)

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. (2020-09-17)

Hubble captures crisp new image of Jupiter and Europa
This latest image of Jupiter, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 25, 2020, was captured when the planet was 653 million kilometres from Earth. Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the Great Red Spot changing color -- again. The new image also features Jupiter's icy moon Europa. (2020-09-17)

A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. (2020-09-16)

NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP captures fires and aerosols across America
On Sep. 07, 2020, NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provided two different views of how fires are affecting the US. (2020-09-08)

A difficult year for forests, fields and meadows
The warm, dry summer of 2018 has left clear traces in various ecosystems. ETH Zurich researchers have found that if the climate continues to warm up, higher altitudes can also expect negative consequences in the future. (2020-09-07)

A 400-year-old chamois will serve as a model for research on ice mummies
The chamois had been protected by the glacier for 400 years and only recently released due to the ice having receded. Due to their age and state of preservation, the remains are in fact a perfect simulant of a human mummy and will allow researchers to improve the conservation techniques of ice mummies all over the world while determining methods for the safeguarding of ancient DNA - a mine of valuable information for humanity. (2020-09-03)

In a mite-y bit of trouble
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate - a finding a University of Queensland researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble. The 1.25 million mite species around the planet occupy an enormous variety of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, from the equator, to polar regions and high altitude areas. (2020-09-02)

Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict. (2020-08-28)

Mount Everest summit success rates double, death rate stays the same over last 30 years
A new study led by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of California, Davis, finds that the success rate of summiting Mount Everest has doubled in the last three decades, even though the number of climbers has greatly increased, crowding the narrow route through the dangerous ''death zone'' near the summit. However, the death rate for climbers has hovered unchanged at around 1% since 1990. (2020-08-26)

Living at higher altitudes associated with higher levels of child stunting
Children living at high altitudes found to be more stunted, on average, than peers at lower altitudes. The deficit increases above 500 meters above sea level, and persists as children age, indicating the need to tailor nutrition interventions targeted at children living in high altitudes. (2020-08-24)

Researchers measure the global magnetic field in solar corona for the first time
An international team led by TIAN Hui, a professor from both Peking University and National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), has measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time. (2020-08-20)

Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth
A research team led by Prof. SHANG Zhaohui from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) has proved that Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth. (2020-08-03)

COVID-19: Lower incidence at high altitudes?
Despite recent reports of lower COVID-19 incidence among high-altitude populations, current data is insufficient to conclude that high altitude is protective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-08-03)

Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research by an international team from China, Australia and the University of British Columbia (UBC). The challenge? The location is one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth. (2020-07-29)

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave
A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago - 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas. Excavations of Chiquihuite Cave, located in a mountainous area in northern Mexico controlled by drugs cartels, uncovered nearly 2000 stone tools from a small section of the high-altitude cave. Analysis of the sediment in the cave uncovered a new story of the colonisation of the Americas. (2020-07-22)

Tibetan antelope thrive at high altitudes using a juvenile form of blood oxygen transport
Adult Tibetan antelope have overcome oxygen deprivation on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau through an unusual adaptation in which they permanently express a form of hemoglobin (the iron-containing oxygen transport protein in red blood cells) that other members of the cattle family only express as juveniles or when under extreme oxygen deprivation. (2020-06-17)

Marine species are outpacing terrestrial species in the race against global warming
Global warming is causing species to search for more temperate environments in which to migrate to, but it is marine species -- according to the latest results of a Franco-American study mainly involving scientists from the CNRS, Ifremer, the Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier and the University of Picardy Jules Verne -- that are leading the way by moving up to six times faster towards the poles than their terrestrial congeners. (2020-05-25)

Past is prologue: Genetic 'memory' of ancestral environments helps organisms readapt
Organisms carry long-term 'memories' of their ancestral homelands that help them adapt to environmental change, according to a new study that involved raising chickens on the Tibetan Plateau and an adjacent lowland site. (2020-05-22)

Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE. (2020-04-30)

Evidence of Late Pleistocene human colonization of isolated islands beyond Wallace's Line
What makes our species unique compared to other hominins? High profile genetic, fossil and material culture discoveries present scientists working in the Late Pleistocene with an ever-more complex picture of interactions between early hominin populations. One distinctive characteristic of Homo sapiens, however, appears to be its global distribution. Exploring how Homo sapiens colonized most of the world's continents in a relatively short period could reveal the exceptional capacities of humans relative to other hominins. (2020-04-29)

Electronics for high-altitude use can get smaller and sturdier with new nanomaterials
Demand is growing for new materials that can be printed at ever smaller dimensions. But materials that work well on Earth don't always hold up well at high altitudes and in space. Scientists are now creating metal-based nanomaterials for circuit boards that could be resistant to high-altitude radiation encountered by aerospace equipment and fighter jets. The researchers are presenting their results through the American Chemical Society SciMeetings online platform. (2020-04-27)

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases
High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences. (2020-04-23)

Atmospheric tidal waves maintain Venus' super-rotation
An international research team led by Takeshi Horinouchi of Hokkaido University has revealed that the 'super-rotation' on Venus is maintained near the equator by atmospheric tidal waves formed from solar heating on the planet's dayside and cooling on its nightside. The study was published online in Science on April 23. (2020-04-23)

The best things come in small packages
A low-cost miniaturized carbon dioxide monitoring instrument has been developed. (2020-04-21)

Lung injury in COVID-19 is not high altitude pulmonary edema
A group of researchers with experience in treating high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) have written to correct the misconception in medical social media forums and elsewhere that the lung injury seen in COVID-19 is not like typical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is instead like HAPE. (2020-04-20)

NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto's displaced rainfall
NASA analyzed weakening Tropical Storm Jeruto's rainfall and found one small area of moderate rainfall displaced from the center, because of strong wind shear. (2020-04-16)

Solar power plants get help from satellites to predict cloud cover
Cloud cover is often characterized in simple terms, such as cloudy, partly cloudy or clear. This does not provide accurate information for estimating the amount of sunlight available for solar power plants. In this week's Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, a new method is reported for estimating cloud optical properties using data from recently launched satellites. This new technique is known as Spectral Cloud Optical Property Estimation, or SCOPE. (2020-04-14)

Observing the atmosphere at high altitudes using unmanned aeria vehicles
Unmanned aerial vehicles sounding data can improve Antarctic weather forecasting to a certain extent, especially the prediction of temperature, wind speed, and humidity. (2020-04-11)

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