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Current High Blood Pressure News and Events, High Blood Pressure News Articles.
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Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper. (2021-01-28)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

New research finds severity of COVID-19 determines likelihood of pregnancy complications
Researchers will unveil findings that suggest that pregnant women who become severely or critically ill due to COVID-19 are at greater risk of dying and experiencing serious pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women who have COVID-19 but were asymptomatic, or without symptoms. In contrast, pregnant women with mild or moderate illness were not at higher risk of pregnancy complications than those without symptoms. (2021-01-28)

Research finds blood pressure can be controlled without drugs after spinal cord injury
Canadian and Swiss researchers have created the first platform to understand the mechanisms underlying blood pressure instability after spinal cord injury. The discovery has led to a new cutting-edge solution. Spinal cord stimulators can bridge the body's autonomous regulation system, controlling blood pressure without medication. Findings are published in Nature. (2021-01-27)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

First direct band gap measurements of wide-gap hydrogen using inelastic X-ray scattering
Utilizing a newly developed state-of-the-art synchrotron technique, a group of scientists led by Dr. Ho-kwang Mao, Director of HPSTAR, conducted the first-ever high-pressure study of the electronic band and gap information of solid hydrogen up to 90 GPa. (2021-01-26)

The longevity gene mammalian Indy (mINDY) is involved in blood pressure regulation
Reduced expression of mINDY, which is known to extend life span in lower organisms and to prevent from diet induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance in mice, has now been shown to lower blood pressure and heart rate in rodents. (2021-01-26)

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (2021-01-26)

Mouse study: gabapentin prevents harmful structural changes in spinal cord
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine found that the widely prescribed pain-relief drug gabapentin can prevent harmful structural changes in the injured spinal cords of mice, and also block cardiovascular changes and immune suppression caused by spinal cord injury. (2021-01-26)

Hypertension symptoms in women often mistaken for menopause
Pregnancy complications and early menopause increase women's future risk of heart disease. Cardiologists, gynaecologists and endocrinologists recommend how to help middle-aged women prevent later heart problems in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published today in European Heart Journal, a journal of the ESC. ''Physicians should intensify the detection of hypertension in middle-aged women,'' states the document. (2021-01-26)

To ward off cancer and other diseases we need to change our lifestyle and focus on innovation
The key factor in preventing non-communicable diseases is lifestyle management at the individual level with a focus on such innovations, which can help increase the awareness of risk factors management in society, claim an international team of researchers, among them - scientists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania in a recent study. According to them, the management of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases requires many strategies from several perspectives and on different levels. (2021-01-25)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

The important role of pharmacists for older adults' health
Pharmacists play an important role in managing medication-based therapies for older community-dwelling patients, according to a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2021-01-21)

COVID-19, influenza and suicide fuel increase in deaths among ICE detainees
Thirty-five people have died in the custody of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) since April 2018, with a seven-fold increase in deaths even as the average daily population decreased by nearly a third between 2019 and 2020, a new USC study shows. (2021-01-21)

Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells
A promising lead halide perovskite is great at converting sunlight to electricity, but it breaks down at room temperature. Now scientists have discovered how to stabilize it with pressure from a diamond anvil cell. The required pressure is well within the reach of industrial manufacturing requirements. (2021-01-21)

General health checkups may detect early signs of Parkinson's disease
A research team led by Nagoya University in Japan has found that blood pressure, the hematocrit, and serum cholesterol levels change in patients with Parkinson's disease long before the onset of motor symptoms. This finding may pave the way for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. (2021-01-19)

Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
A team of researchers led by the University of South Florida has decoded the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake, which has venom 40 times more toxic than that of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes, the largest venomous snake in North America. (2021-01-19)

New negative pressure ventilator requiring fewer staffing resources developed in fight against COVID-19
A new negative pressure ventilator which could provide additional treatment options for patients with respiratory failure, including those with COVID-19 - and whose design can be easily adapted to developing countries - has been created by a team that includes anaesthetists, nurses and engineers. (2021-01-19)

Smoking directly linked to a higher risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage
The relationship between smoking and risk of a serious type of bleeding stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) appeared to be linear, with risk of SAH increasing significantly among people considered heavy smokers. People with genetic variants that predisposed them to smoking behaviors have an increased risk of SAH by more than 60%. (2021-01-14)

Stretching more effective than walking to lower high blood pressure: USask study
A new University of Saskatchewan (USask) study has found that stretching is superior to brisk walking for reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure or who are at risk of developing elevated blood pressure levels. (2021-01-14)

Fetal-maternal discordance in APOL1 genotype contributes to preeclampsia risk
Fetal APOL1 kidney risk alleles are associated with increased risk for preeclampsia in African Americans and maternal fetal genotype discordance is also associated with this risk. (2021-01-12)

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite. The phenomenon can be used to efficiently detect the metabolite in crude biological samples, which is important for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and associated pathologies. (2021-01-11)

An augmented immune response explains the adverse course of COVID-19 in patients with hypertension
COVID-19 patients who also suffer from high blood pressure are more likely to fall severely ill with the disease, which also leaves them at greater risk of death. Scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in collaboration with partners in Heidelberg and Leipzig, have now found that the immune cells of patients with hypertension are already pre-activated, and that this pre-activation is greatly enhanced under COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

Study finds commonly used blood pressure medications safe for COVID-19 patients
Medications to treat high blood pressure did not affect outcomes among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The study is the first randomized controlled trial to show there is no risk for patients continuing these medications while hospitalized for COVID-19. (2021-01-07)

Hydroxychloroquine blood levels predict clotting risk in patients with lupus
A new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology shows that monitoring patients' blood levels of hydroxychloroquine can predict their clotting risk. (2021-01-06)

COVID-19 unmasked: math model suggests optimal treatment strategies
For older patients with COVID-19 infections, the clot-preventing drug heparin and immunity-enhancing drugs may improve outcomes. Patients with conditions such as obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure may benefit from anti-inflammatory drugs and drugs used to control blood pressure and vascular resistance. (2021-01-05)

Chemists describe a new form of ice
Scientists from the United States, China, and Russia have described the structure and properties of a novel hydrogen clathrate hydrate that forms at room temperature and relatively low pressure. Hydrogen hydrates are a potential solution for hydrogen storage and transportation, the most environmentally friendly fuel. (2020-12-22)

Putting on the pressure improves glass for fiber optics
Rapid, accurate communication worldwide is possible via fiber optic cables, but as good as they are, they are not perfect. Now, researchers from Penn State and AGC Inc. in Japan suggest that the silica glass used for these cables would have less signal loss if it were manufactured under high pressure. (2020-12-22)

Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater death risk
Robust evidence from a large international study confirms that a difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death. (2020-12-21)

Regulating off-centering distortion maximizes photoluminescence in halide perovskites
In work published in the National Science Review (nwaa288), a team at HPSTAR led by Dr. Xujie Lü applied high pressure to tune the remarkable photoluminescence (PL) properties in halide perovskites. For the first time, they reveal a universal relationship whereby regulating the level of off-centering distortion (towards 0.2) can achieve optimal PL performance. (2020-12-21)

A full blood count of COVID-19 patients can predict disease severity
International research led by the Radboud university medical center shows that a full blood count of COVID-19 patients predicts fairly accurately whether the infection will have a complicated course or not. This makes it easier for healthcare providers to estimate the expected clinical picture. This study, conducted in eleven hospitals, has now been published in the scientific journal eLife. (2020-12-21)

Protecting against atherosclerosis at the molecular level
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which CREB3L3 protects against atherosclerosis. By studying the absence or overexpression of the protein in mice prone to develop atherosclerosis, the researchers demonstrated that the absence of CREB3L3 exacerbates the formation of atherosclerosis, whereby the overexpression protects against atherosclerosis. At the molecular level, CREB3L3 exhibited its protective effects by inhibiting SREBP. This study could help develop a novel molecular target against atherosclerosis. (2020-12-20)

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease. The increased heart disease risk is especially pronounced in people with HIV who also have kidney disease. The increased heart disease risk remains regardless of HIV severity or use of antiretroviral therapy. (2020-12-17)

Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery - potentially leading to serious health consequences. (2020-12-16)

Novel biomarkers predict the development of incident heart failure
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital have discovered several new biomarkers that are associated with incident heart failure. In a new study, several inflammatory biomarkers and cell energy metabolites were linked to an increased risk of incident heart failure. (2020-12-16)

CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. Researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%. (2020-12-16)

Structural racism severely impacts the health of foreign-born Blacks and Latinx
Structural racism can lead to discrimination in many aspects of life including criminal justice, employment, housing, health care, political power, and education. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examines the impact of structural racism on health and confirms that chronic exposure to stressors leads to a marked erosion of health that is particularly severe among foreign-born Blacks and Latinx. Investigators say largescale structural policies that address structural racism are needed. (2020-12-15)

Hopes of new treatment strategies for glaucoma
In the search for new ways to treat the incurable eye disease glaucoma, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and St. Erik Eye Hospital in Sweden have discovered more clues as to its pathogenesis. A new study shows how metabolic disturbance of the neurons coincide with raised pressure in the eye. In animal and cell models, rapamycin and pyruvate treatments were shown to have a protective effect. The study is published in the journal PNAS. (2020-12-15)

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