Current Higher Education News and Events

Current Higher Education News and Events, Higher Education News Articles.
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Experts call for more pragmatic approach to higher education teaching
Millions of students around the world could benefit if their educators adopted a more flexible and practical approach, say Swansea University experts. After analysing the techniques current being used in higher education, the researchers have released a new paper calling for a pragmatic and evidence-based approach instead. (2021-01-22)

Online courses reinforce inequalities
With the global student community taking online courses, a study (UNIGE) reveals that online courses deepen inequalities between gifted and less gifted students by 5%. The results of the study, which was based on data collected in 2016-2017 prior to the anti-Covid lockdown initiatives. They indicate that this learning gap between different student profiles is mainly due to their behaviour and motivation. (2021-01-19)

Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined--in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America--five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures. (2021-01-14)

Living alone may increase risk of dying after hip fracture
Individuals face a higher risk of dying following hip fractures. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research has found that living alone after experiencing a hip fracture may further elevate this risk. (2021-01-06)

Researchers: drop the notion that more hours spent studying guarantees higher educational quality
Several Danish universities have a financial incentive to ensure that their students spend a great amount of time on study-related assignments. But the number of hours spent by students on their studies does not necessarily guarantee programme quality and student engagement, according to a critique by the researchers behind a new University of Copenhagen study. (2020-12-08)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Understanding declining teenage pregnancies in England
Declining rates of teenage pregnancies in England are related to local areas experiencing less youth unemployment, growing Black or South Asian teenage populations, more educational attainment, unaffordable housing, and a lack of available social housing, a recent study has found. (2020-11-10)

Risk of dying from COVID-19 greater for men, unmarried and born in low and middle income countries
Being a man, having a lower income, having a lower level of education, not being married, and being born abroad in low- or middle-income countries - these are factors that, independent of one another, are related to an elevated risk of dying from COVID-19 in Sweden. These are the findings of a new study in the journal Nature Communications from Stockholm University. (2020-10-09)

Older people have become younger
The functional ability of older people is nowadays better when it is compared to that of people at the same age three decades ago. (2020-09-21)

RCSI research finds air pollution in Ireland associated with strokes
Scientists have found that air pollution in the winter is associated with more hospitalisations for all strokes in Dublin. (2020-08-11)

First generation university students need more guidance navigating education system
Young people who are the first in their family to go to university are less likely to attend an elite institution and are more likely to drop out than those with graduate parents, according to new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies. (2020-08-11)

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa. (2020-07-22)

Does "naming and shaming" of colleges with large tuition increases make a difference?
A study published in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis today found that the U.S. Department of Education's ''naming and shaming'' of colleges with large tuition increases does not affect institutional pricing policies or students' enrollment decisions. (2020-07-16)

Achievement isn't why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
Researchers at New York University's Steinhardt School found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers. On the contrary, the scholars found that men with very low high-school GPAs in math and science and very low SAT math scores were choosing these math-intensive majors just as often as women with much higher math and science achievement. (2020-06-18)

Boys' poor reading skills might help explain higher education gender gap
Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Essex in the United Kingdom found boys' poor reading skills in adolescence, combined with the social attitudes about women attending college, can help explain why fewer men than women enroll in higher education or other types of post-high school education. (2020-06-08)

No laughing matter
A new study involving a scientific analysis of the prevalence of 'LOL' in students' text messages demonstrates important potential applications for classroom learning. The study, 'Linguistics in General Education: Expanding Linguistics Course Offerings through Core Competency Alignment,' will be published in the June 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language. An advance version of the article may be found at https://www.linguisticsociety.org/sites/default/files/LSA962101_0.pdf. (2020-05-27)

Parents with degrees give their children significant advantage in maths
Children of parents with a degree are almost a year of schooling ahead in maths by the age 11 than peers whose parents have just GCSEs, a new study by the University of Sussex has discovered. (2020-05-20)

Diminished returns of educational attainment on heart disease among black Americans
Using a nationally representative sample, the researchers explored racial/ethnic variation in the link between educational attainment and heart disease among American adults. (2020-05-06)

SMU professors detail how homeless students are doing educationally in Houston ISD
A new report by SMU professors Alexandra Pavlakis and Meredith Richards details how homeless students in Houston ISD are faring educationally. (2020-04-23)

The retention effect of training
Company training increases the loyalty of its employees. Loyalty also increases if the training improves the employees' chances on the labour market. (2020-04-15)

STEM students learn as well online as in classrooms
Students learned just as much in online STEM college courses as they did in traditional classroom settings, and at a fraction of the cost, according to a first-of-its-kind study. (2020-04-08)

New index challenges university rankings
Academic freedom is fundamental to scientific progress, pursuit of truth, quality higher education and international collaboration. Universities and states have signed statements of their commitment to safeguard academic freedom, yet in practice, they do not always implement them. How severe are infringements of academic freedom? Are these infringements getting better or worse? Prof. Dr. Katrin Kinzelbach of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has investigated these questions in collaboration with international partners and has published a global academic freedom index. (2020-03-26)

Culturally adapted materials boost Latino participation in diabetes education programs
An Oregon State University study published last week found that diabetes education programs that are linguistically and culturally tailored to Latinos lead to significantly higher rates of completion among Latino participants -- even higher than rates among non-Latinos enrolled in the English versions of those programs. (2020-03-25)

Young teachers happier but say hard work is unrewarded
Newly qualified teachers report higher levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction compared to other graduates, but are more likely to say hard work in Britain is unrewarded, according to UCL research. (2020-03-05)

Diversity semantics shift higher ed inclusivity away from students of color
Affirmative action in higher education was originally meant to rebalance the scales of mostly-white, mostly-male institutions. But a study from the University of Colorado Denver found that the legal semantics of two landmark Supreme Court cases have redefined the focus of affirmative action from access for students of color to educational benefits for white students. (2020-03-04)

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education. For example, by uploading recorded lectures online, students can reference a digital copy of the topics discussed in class. However, lecture-based teaching traditionally leaves students as consumers of information solely with little room for student creativity or interaction. (2020-02-24)

Patients most at risk of overdose at the beginning and after end of methadone treatment
A new study, led by RCSI researchers, has found that patients receiving methadone treatment are most at risk of overdosing in the month following the end of methadone treatment and during the first four weeks of treatment. (2020-02-20)

New study examines ways to improve cancer literacy in young students
A new study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that implementing cancer education curricula in middle and high schools may improve cancer literacy in Kentuckians and ultimately help reduce cancer rates. (2020-02-10)

'Cinderella subject' of Sport & Exercise Science vital to keeping Wales healthy & wealthy
Sport and Exercise Science has been described as the 'Cinderella' subject of Wales and a key part of the Welsh economy, according to new labour market data being released at an event in the Assembly tomorrow (Tuesday). (2020-01-27)

Breast density notification laws not effective for all women
A new Yale study suggests that state-mandated notifications on mammogram reports intended to inform women of the health risks related to breast density are not worded effectively. (2020-01-09)

US$1 dollar increase in minimum wage linked to 3.5-6% fall in suicide rate
A US$1 increase in the minimum wage is linked to a fall in the suicide rate of between 3.5 and 6% among people with high school education or less, reveals a 26-year study, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2020-01-07)

Genes and family are biggest predictor of academic success, study suggests
Whether children will enjoy academic success can be now predicted at birth, a new study suggests. The study, led by the University of York, found that parents' socioeconomic status and children's inherited DNA differences are powerful predictors of educational achievement. (2019-12-18)

Low income and work stress contribute to link between education, heart disease and stroke
Low educational levels predict an increased risk of developing or dying from heart disease and stroke according to the first nationwide study of the link between education and risk of cardiovascular disease. The study, published in the European Heart Journal, is also the first nationwide study to look at the extent to which low income and work stress plays a role in the association between education and cardiovascular disease. (2019-12-16)

Cooking practices during pregnancy may affect hyperactivity in children
In pregnant women, exposure to cooking fumes was related to an increased risk of their children having hyperactivity behaviors at the age of 3 years. The findings come from an Indoor Air study of 45,518 mothers of children who were newly enrolled in school in Shenzhen, China, from 2015 to 2017. (2019-12-04)

Studies examine potential link between traffic-related air pollution and obesity in Mexican-Americans
Exposure to traffic pollution was associated with a higher risk of obesity in Mexican-American women, but not in men. The findings are published in Obesity. (2019-12-04)

Why women select college majors with lower earnings potential
Even when both male and female college students say they want to pursue a major with the best earnings prospects, the majors men choose are higher paying than the majors women choose. (2019-11-25)

Schools less important than parents in determining higher education aspirations
A new study shows that the elementary school a child attends has almost no influence on their desire to progress to higher education -- as factors including parental aspirations, academic support from their mother and having a desk to work on are much more important. (2019-11-17)

Higher education holds key to more age-friendly society, publication says
The age-friendly movement is an ideal means of embracing demographic shifts in higher education and society at large, according to the latest issue in the What's Hot newsletter series from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), titled 'Higher Education and Aging: The Age-Friendly Movement -- Building a Case for Age Inclusivity.' Support for the publication was provided by AARP. (2019-11-12)

In blacks with Alzheimer's gene, higher education may be protective
A new study from Columbia University found that a higher level of education protected against cognitive decline in black people with a gene linked to Alzheimer's disease. (2019-10-30)

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