Current Hikers Returned News and Events

Current Hikers Returned News and Events, Hikers Returned News Articles.
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RUDN University veterinarians tested a new drug against pneumonia in calves
Respiratory tract diseases in young animals of the cattle are a big issue for world agriculture and food safety because a bacterium that causes them is resistant to most antibiotics. A team of veterinarians from RUDN University developed and tested a complex preparation called gentaminoseleferon that could help treat respiratory infection in calves. (2021-02-10)

Load-reducing backpack powers electronics by harvesting energy from walking
Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack, reported in ACS Nano, could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researchers say. (2021-02-03)

Using science to explore a 60-year-old Russian mystery
Researchers from EPFL and ETH Zurich have conducted an original scientific study that puts forth a plausible explanation for the mysterious 1959 death of nine hikers in the Ural Mountains in the former Soviet Union. The tragic Dyatlov Pass Incident, as it came to be called, has spawned a number of theories, from murderous Yeti to secret military experiments. (2021-01-28)

Initial severity of COVID-19 not associated with later respiratory complications
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the recovery of lung function and overall wellness in individuals who had varying degrees of COVID-19 severity. Little is known about lung health following infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and whether later respiratory problems, fatigue and ill health are associated with the disease's initial severity. (2021-01-08)

Remote sensing data sheds light on when and how asteroid Ryugu lost its water
Rocks on Ryugu, a 'rubble pile' near-Earth asteroid recently visited by Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft, appear to have lost much of their water before they came together to form the asteroid, new research suggests. (2021-01-05)

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes (2020-12-21)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
Although many studies have found that humans benefit from spending time in nature, few studies have explored why. Researchers hid speakers that played recorded songs from a diverse group of birds on two sections of trails in Colorado. Hikers who heard the bird songs reported a greater sense of well-being than those who didn't. The survey results showed that both the sounds themselves and people's perception of biodiversity can increase humans' feelings of well-being. (2020-12-15)

There are microplastics near the top of Mount Everest too
Researchers analyzing snow and stream samples from the National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition have found evidence of microplastic pollution on Mount Everest. While the highest concentrations of microplastics were around Base Camp where hikers and trekkers spend the most time, the team also found microplastics as high up as 8,440 meters above sea level, just below the summit. The findings appear November 20 in the journal One Earth. (2020-11-20)

Retreating glacier presents landslide threat, tsunami risk in Alaskan fjord
Using NASA satellite imagery and software processing approaches, a group of geoscientists has discovered a landslide-generated tsunami threat in Barry Arm, Alaska, that will likely affect tourists and locals in the surrounding area in the next 20 years. (2020-11-13)

Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight
Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. They have identified a specific area of the brain that encodes both spatial and threat cues to drive location-specific defensive responses. (2020-10-29)

'Less pain' to remove tonsils
A 10-year study from Flinders University has found ''shrinking'' tonsils results in far less pain and bleeding than a full tonsillectomy. The research paper, published this month in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, looked at 608 children who underwent tonsil surgery between 2008 and 2018. (2020-10-13)

SwRI scientists study the rugged surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu
As the days count down to NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's Touch-And-Go asteroid sample collection attempt, Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped determine what the spacecraft can expect to return from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu's surface. Three papers published online by Science on Oct. 8 discuss the color, reflectivity, age, composition, origin and distribution of materials that make up the asteroid's rough surface. (2020-10-08)

Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
A mathematician from Cardiff University has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker. (2020-10-07)

Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas. All wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by recreational users. And they avoided mountain bikers and motorized vehicles significantly more than they did hikers and horseback riders. (2020-09-24)

As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live
COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women. (2020-09-14)

Dropping it in the mail: Best practices detailed for mail-in colon cancer screenings
A program that asks patients to mail in stool samples to screen for colon cancer is an effective way to expand screenings to underserved and underinsured communities and offers an alternative to in-person testing during the pandemic, according to a study conducted by UT Southwestern. (2020-09-08)

Mount Sinai study finds COVID patients were most commonly readmitted to hospital for respiratory complications
Study describes characteristics of patients with COVID-19 who returned to the ER or required readmission to the hospital within 14 days of being discharged (2020-08-21)

Independent search engines respect your privacy but give more visibility to misinformation
Anti-vaccine websites, which could play a key role in promoting public hesitancy about a potential COVID vaccine, are far more likely to be found via independent search engines than through an internet giant like Google. (2020-08-13)

One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds
A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery. (2020-07-30)

Acute exercise has beneficial effects on the immune system during prostate cancer
New research published this week in Experimental Physiology found that in prostate cancer survivors, a moderate bout of exercise kept the cell count of certain type of immune cells at a normal level, suggesting the exercise is safe for prostate cancer survivors. After 24 hours after a moderate bout of cycling, the immune cell count of natural killer (NK) cells, part of the body's first line of defence, had returned to resting levels. (2020-07-28)

Why hydration is so important when hiking in the heat of summer
A recent study showed that compared to moderate weather conditions, hikers' performance during hot weather was impaired, resulting in slower hiking speeds and prolonged exposure to the elements, thus increasing their risk of heat-related illness. The study also found that most hikers did not bring enough fluid with them on their hike to compensate for their sweat loss. (2020-07-14)

Is not helping a bad person good or bad?
A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University has analyzed how the social norm of indirect reciprocity is adopted in human society and revealed results that contradicted previous theoretical predictions. The study was carried out in collaboration with colleagues Takahisa Suzuki (Tsuda University) and Ryohei Umetani (Rissho University), and its results were published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on June 30, 2020. (2020-07-01)

Study on firms' return policies offers guidance on pricing, returns, refunds
A new study examined the decisions around the pricing and return policies of a retailer with both stores and online sales to help explain why some firms opt to fully refund customers for their returns while others charge a fee for online returns. The findings offer guidance to retailers about pricing and policies on returns and refunds. (2020-04-30)

Nature: Don't hope mature forests to soak up carbon dioxide emissions
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is sometimes described as ''food for plants'' as it is the key ingredient in plant photosynthesis. Experiments in which single trees and young, rapidly growing forests have been exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations have shown that plants use the extra carbon acquired through photosynthesis to grow faster. (2020-04-15)

Canada lynx disappearing from Washington state
Canada lynx are losing ground in Washington state, even as federal officials are taking steps to remove the species' threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. A massive monitoring study led by WSU researchers has found the big cat on only about 20% of its potential habitat in the state. (2020-04-09)

Wildfire perceptions largely positive after hiking in a burned landscape
Results from pre- and post-hike surveys of a burned landscape indicate that people understand and appreciate the role of fire in natural landscapes more than is perceived. (2020-03-26)

Surveillance after surgery does not improve outcomes for patients with glioblastoma
A retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care showed patients who underwent surveillance imaging after surgery for brain tumor resection did not have better outcomes than patients who did not have imaging and returned when they felt symptoms of recurrence. (2020-02-26)

When it comes to conservation, ditch the 'canary in the coal mine'
With habitat loss threatening the extinction of an ever-growing number of species around the world, many wildlife advocates and conservation professionals rely on the proverbial 'canary in the coal mine'--monitoring and protecting a single representative species--to maintain healthy wildlife biodiversity. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that habitats are better served if conservation efforts focus on a collection of species rather than a single 'canary.' (2020-02-25)

When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait
A new study concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice. In two-thirds of cases where physicians did not change treatment for patients with hypertension, patients' blood pressure returned to normal in follow-up readings taken at home. (2020-02-18)

Siri, help me quit -- what does your smart device say when you ask for help with addiction?
A new study published in Nature Partner Journal's Digital Medicine finds that the leading intelligent virtual assistants fail to understand questions about where to find help for substance misuse. Intelligent virtual assistants were frequently confused providing no response, and in one instance the response was for a recommendation on where to buy drugs. But the study's authors remain optimistic that smart devices could be a game changer for helping the millions now seeking help with addiction and the millions more to come. (2020-01-29)

Researcher looking for clues in the mystery of the Grand Canyon's water supply
Research technician Natalie Jones is the lead author on a paper that looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. Along with professor Abe Springer, she created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system. (2020-01-23)

'Marshmallow test' redux: Children show better self-control when they depend on each other
The researchers say their experiments are the first to show that children are more willing to delay gratification for cooperative reasons than for individual goals. (2020-01-14)

How retailers can make more money in online auctions
To get more participants in online auctions and drive up the winning bid prices, two things matter: how long an auction is active and the day of the week it closes, finds researchers from the University Maryland, Stanford University, University of Pennsylvania and Indiana University. (2020-01-13)

More Chinese scientists in America are going back home
A growing number of Chinese scientists working in the United States and other parts of the world are returning to their homeland, enhancing China's research productivity. In a new study, researchers found that more than 16,000 researchers have returned to China from other countries since that nation has opened up to international engagement. More than 4,500 left the United States for China in 2017 - nearly double the number who left in 2010. (2019-12-30)

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events
Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space. (2019-12-05)

Chronic opioid treatment may increase PTSD risk
Long-term (chronic) treatment with opioids, such as morphine, prior to trauma enhances fear learning in mice, according to a study published in Neuropsychopharmacology. The findings, which link chronic opioid treatment before a traumatic event with responses to subsequent stressful events, may suggest a possible mechanism underlying the frequent co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid dependence. (2019-12-01)

Joint statement from six journals highlights concerns about EPA proposed rule
In a joint journal statement in this issue, the editors-in-chief of six scientific journals (Science, Nature, Cell, PNAS, PLOS and The Lancet) highlight their concerns regarding the 2018 'Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science' rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has recently returned to the spotlight following a hearing on evidence in policy-making. (2019-11-26)

Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop
A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking. (2019-11-20)

Stanford researchers explore how citizens can become agents of environmental change
Some programs work better than others when it comes to involving citizens in preserving the environment. After reviewing those that worked, Stanford researchers propose a blueprint for how others can educate people to maximize their impact. (2019-11-14)

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