Current History News and Events

Current History News and Events, History News Articles.
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Model predicts likelihood of persistent high-dose opioid use after knee surgery
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified 10 readily available clinical factors that may predict which patients will persistently use high doses of opioids in the year following knee replacement surgery. (2021-02-03)

Study updates breast cancer risk estimates for women with no family history
A new multi-institution study led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist, provides more accurate estimates of breast cancer risk for U.S. women who harbor inherited mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes. The findings of the CARRIERS Consortium study, published Jan. 20 in The New England Journal of Medicine, may allow health care providers to better assess the risk of breast cancer in women ? many of whom have no family history of breast cancer. (2021-01-21)

Enriching research in ecology and evolution through nine 'flavors' of history
In a recent article in The Quarterly Review of Biology, ''Beyond Equilibria: The Neglected Role of History in Ecology and Evolution,'' author Hamish G. Spencer argues for a revitalized view of history. This historical view is a response to current research in the field of ecology and evolution, which is dominated by an ahistorical view of dynamic systems. (2020-11-23)

Predicting preterm births
Researchers studied how family history can predict preterm birth. (2020-11-19)

Tiny cave snail with muffin-top waistline rolls out of the dark in Laos
Recent cave exploration has turned up a tiny, top-heavy snail that glistens under the light of the microscope lens. Only 1.80 mm tall, this transparent snail bulges at the middle, giving a natural appearance to the ''muffin-top'' waistline. The paper, authored by Adrienne Jochum and co-authors from France and Switzerland, and published in the open-access journal Subterranean Biology, reveals new biodiversity from the seldom explored caves of central Laos. (2020-11-16)

New bird genomes give insight into evolution of genomic diversity
The Bird 10,000 Genome Project (B10K), an initiative to sequence the genomes of all living bird species, announces the completion of its second milestone--the release of genomes representing 92% of all bird families. (2020-11-12)

New primate species discovered in Myanmar
100 year-old London museum sample gave decisive hints. (2020-11-10)

New ancient genomes reveal a complex common history of dogs and humans
Newly sequenced whole genomes of ancient dogs reveal a complicated genetic legacy that reflects a long, shared history with humans spanning more than 11,000 years into the past. (2020-10-29)

Study shows the major impact of diabetes on the risk of falls
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year (21-25 September), shows that having type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a 33% increase in the risk of falls compared with the general population, while having type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 19% increased risk of falls. (2020-09-20)

Sleep apnea linked with higher spine fracture risk among women
Emerging evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may negatively affect bone health. Results from a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research now indicate that women with history of OSA may face a higher risk of spine, or vertebral, fractures. (2020-09-10)

Older and richer: Old grasslands show high biodiversity and conservation value
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba and Kobe University have found that the long-term, sustained existence of grasslands can increase plant diversity, and can act as an indicator for grasslands of high conservation importance. Old grasslands showed a higher plant diversity than forests and new grasslands, and acted as refuges for native and endangered grassland-dependent plant species. The plant community of old grasslands was shown to be unique, indicating that they are of high conservation priority. (2020-09-10)

Swedish workers among Europe's best-paid in late 1800s
In 19th-century Sweden, workers' wages rose faster than in other European countries. By 1900, they were among the highest in Europe, and the steepest rise of all had been for those who earned least. This is shown by new research at Uppsala University: a study published in The Journal of Economic History. (2020-09-01)

High blood pressure during pregnancy may mean worse hot flashes during menopause
Women with a history of high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy are more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 19, in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. (2020-08-19)

Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers
People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer, suggests a letter published in the journal Gut detailing a prospective study. (2020-07-20)

High-throughput sequencing tracks historical spread of grapevine viruses
A group of scientists based in France used systematical datamining to gather information on two grapevine trichoviruses, grapevine Pinot gris virus and grapevine berry inner necrosis virus. They were able to capture new complete viral genomes from around the world. They gathered this information using their own HTS-datasets and by tapping into worldwide HTS databases. This compiled information helped unravel the evolutionary history of these two emerging viruses that display a new threat to viticulture. (2020-07-06)

Repeated head impacts associated with later-life depression symptoms, worse cognitive function
In the largest study of its kind, an association has been found in living patients exposed to repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later. (2020-06-26)

UBC study identifies social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying
Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study. The researchers analyzed data collected from 13,611 adults in the U.S. between 1992 and 2008, and identified which factors applied to those who died between 2008 and 2014. They intentionally excluded biological and medical factors. (2020-06-22)

Analysis of ancient genomes suggests Caribbean settled by three colonization events
The islands of the Caribbean were settled and resettled by at least three successive waves of colonists from the American mainland, according to a new study, which presents new findings from an examination of ancient DNA from 93 early Caribbean islanders. (2020-06-04)

Information technology played key role in growth of ancient civilizations
A new paper in Nature Communications shows the ability to store and process information was as critical to the growth of early human societies as it is today. (2020-05-27)

The genome of chimpanzees and gorillas could help to better understand human tumors
A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), a joint center of UPF and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), shows that, surprisingly, the distribution of mutations in human tumors is more similar to that of chimpanzees and gorillas than that of humans. (2020-05-21)

A history of cannabis dependence associated with many negative mental health outcomes
More than 1% of Canadians have been dependent on cannabis at some point in their lives. Despite the fact that marijuana use is expected to grow with the recent legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada, little research has focused on factors associated with recovery from addiction. (2020-04-22)

Study reveals an inherited origin of prostate cancer in families
Vanderbilt researchers have identified haplotypes, ancestral fragments of DNA, that are associated with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) in a first-of-its-kind genomic study made possible by the study of prostate cancer patients with family histories of the disease. (2020-03-23)

Scientists develop algorithm for researching evolution of species with WGD
An international team of scientists from ITMO University and George Washington University (USA) created an algorithm for studying the evolutionary history of species with whole-genome duplications, chiefly yeast and plants. The program can be used to analyze the genetic information about these species and make conclusions on how whole-genome duplication took place and why it secured a foothold in the process of evolution. The article was published in Oxford Bioinformatics, one of the leading titles in the field of Computer Science. (2020-02-25)

Children's fingertip injuries could signal abuse
Many children who suffer fingertip injuries have been abused, according to a Rutgers study. The researchers found that children who had a documented history of abuse or neglect were 23 percent more likely to suffer a fingertip injury before age 12. The study, published in Journal of Hand Surgery Global Online, is the first to look at the link between children's fingertip injures and abuse or neglect. (2020-02-12)

Earlier falls predict subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women
The risk of fracture in postmenopausal women can be predicted by history of falls, according to new findings from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) at the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Osteoporosis International, the study is the first to follow up on the association between history of falls and subsequent fractures. (2020-01-09)

Concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide
Concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury, has been linked to an increased risk of depression and suicide in adults. Now new research published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) suggests high school students with a history of sports-related concussions might be at an increased risk for suicide completion. (2019-11-25)

How prenatal diet, delivery mode and infant feeding relate to pediatric allergies
Two new studies being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on how prenatal diet, the way the baby is delivered, and infant feeding practices can affect the risk of allergy. (2019-11-08)

Ancient roman DNA reveals genetic crossroads of Europe and Mediterranean
All roads may lead to Rome, and in ancient times, a great many European genetic lineages did too, according to a new study. Its results, perhaps the most detailed analysis of changing genetic variation patterns in the region to date, reveal a dynamic population history from the Mesolithic (~10,000 BCE) into modern times, and spanning the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. (2019-11-07)

The importance of Madagascar's lowland rainforest for lemur conservation
Throughout their evolutionary history, animals in regions with limited lowland habitat have evolved to adapt to higher elevations. Although lemurs -- among the most endangered mammals on Earth -- are flexible and can persist at intermediate and high elevations in the Madagascar's eastern rainforest, a new Mammal Review study shows that the few remaining patches of lowland rainforest host the highest levels of lemur abundance for several species. (2019-11-06)

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic
An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. The researchers reconstructed 34 Y. pestis genomes, tracing the genetic history of the bacterium, which revealed key insights into the initiation and progression of the second plague pandemic in Europe. (2019-10-02)

Soil scientist researches nature versus nurture in microorganisms
Ember Morrissey, assistant professor of environmental microbiology at West Virginia University, uncovered that nature significantly affects how the tiny organisms under our feet respond to their current surroundings. (2019-09-11)

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine
Scientific analysis of dental calculus -- plaque build-up -- of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs. (2019-09-09)

Young adults exposed to incarceration as children prone to depression
Young adults with childhood history of both parental incarceration and juvenile justice involvement were nearly three times more likely to have depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to peers without any experience with the criminal justice system, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. (2019-09-04)

Family history of diabetes linked to increased bone mineral density
The association between type 2 diabetes and increased fracture risk is well documented. However, little was known about the possible effect of family history of diabetes on bone mineral density (BMD). A study from China now confirms that a history of first-degree family members with diabetes is linked to increased BMD as well as to insulin resistance. Results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2019-08-21)

Cancer survivors in high deductible health plans more likely to have delayed care
A new study from American Cancer Society investigators finds cancer survivors in high deductible health plans were more likely to report delaying or foregoing care. (2019-08-08)

Impaired brain activity in rats with family history of alcohol abuse
Neural activity that reflects the intention to drink alcohol is observed in the prefrontal cortex and is blunted in rats with a family history of excessive drinking, according to research from eNeuro. This insight could lead to novel treatments for alcohol use disorders. (2019-07-29)

The ancient history of Neandertals in Europe
Parts of the genomes of two ~120,000-year-old Neandertals from Germany and Belgium have been sequenced at the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology. The analyses showed that the last Neandertals, who lived around 40,000 years ago, trace at least part of their ancestry back to these European Neandertals that lived around 80,000 years earlier. The 120,000-year-old Neandertal from Germany, however, carried some ancestry that may originate from an isolated Neandertal population or from relatives of modern humans. (2019-06-26)

Skin bacteria could save frogs from virus
Bacteria living on the skin of frogs could save them from a deadly virus, new research suggests. (2019-06-21)

New algorithm uses disease history to predict intensive care patients' chances of survival
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Rigshospitalet have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. Among other things, it uses disease history from the past 23 years to predict patients' chances of survival in intensive care units. (2019-05-24)

Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment
By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought. This study was published on May 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-05-15)

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