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Current Honeybees News and Events, Honeybees News Articles.
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Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California. (2019-08-30)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Honeybee brain development may enhance waggle dance communication
Changes in a vibration-sensitive neuron may equip forager honeybees for waggle dance communication, according to research recently published in eNeuro. (2019-08-26)

Scientists use honey and wild salmon to trace industrial metals in the environment
Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. By analysing the relative presence of differing lead isotopes in honey and Pacific salmon, Vancouver-based scientists have been able to trace the sources of lead (and other metals) throughout the region. The research is being presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Barcelona. (2019-08-21)

Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)

Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees. (2019-08-08)

Pesticides deliver a one-two punch to honey bees
A new paper in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reveals that adjuvants, chemicals commonly added to pesticides, amplify toxicity affecting mortality rates, flight intensity, colony intensity, and pupae development in honey bees. (2019-08-05)

Three concepts from complexity could play a big role in social animal research
A new paper in Animal Behaviour lays out three concepts from complex systems science that could advance studies into animal social complexity. (2019-08-01)

Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skylight
A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees. Evripidis Gkanias of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., and colleagues present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-07-18)

'Intensive' beekeeping not to blame for common bee diseases
More 'intensive' beekeeping does not raise the risk of diseases that harm or kill the insects, new research suggests. (2019-07-17)

Study: Global farming trends threaten food security
Citrus fruits, coffee and avocados: the food on our tables has become more diverse in recent decades. However, global agriculture does not reflect this trend. Monocultures are increasing worldwide, taking up more land than ever. At the same time, many of the crops being grown rely on pollination by insects and other animals. This puts food security at increased risk, as a team of researchers writes in the journal Global Change Biology. (2019-07-11)

Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues. (2019-06-26)

Honeybees infect wild bumblebees -- through shared flowers
Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. This research suggests commercial apiaries may need to be kept away from areas where there are vulnerable native pollinator species, like the endangered rusty patched bumblebee. (2019-06-26)

Honeybee mite raises bumblebee virus risk
A mite that spreads a dangerous virus among honeybees also plays an indirect role in infecting wild bumblebees, new research shows. (2019-06-12)

A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera. This article emphasizes the need to develop sustainable agricultural and apicultural schemes. (2019-06-04)

Bees can link symbols to numbers: Study
We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math. Now researchers have discovered they may also be capable of connecting symbols to numbers. It's a finding that sheds new light on how numerical abilities may have evolved over millennia and even opens new possibilities for communication between humans and other species. (2019-06-04)

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too
A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult. (2019-05-15)

Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning
A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp. (2019-05-07)

Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees
The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways. While it has no demonstrably negative effect on honeybees, it disrupts the growth of bumblebees and threatens the survival of entire colonies. However, the insecticide does not make either species more susceptible to diseases and pathogens, as a massive field study in Sweden shows. The latest findings were published in the renowned journal ''Nature Communications''. (2019-04-23)

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders. (2019-04-15)

Tiny traces of neonicotinoid pesticides impair insects' ability to spot predators
Traces of neonicotinoid pesticides can impair a flying insect's ability to spot predators and avoid collisions with objects in their path. (2019-04-10)

Insects in decline: On farmland, latecomers lose out
Wild bees in Europe are in trouble -- more than 50 percent of local species are now classified as endangered. Recent findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet researchers indicate that, in farming areas, species that emerge in late summer are most acutely threatened. (2019-03-07)

Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes
For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance. Biologists at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have now shed some new light on the benefits and disadvantages of the bee dance. (2019-02-22)

Biologists identify honeybee 'clean' genes known for improving survival
The key to breeding disease-resistant honeybees could lie in a group of genes -- known for controlling hygienic behaviour -- that enable colonies to limit the spread of harmful mites and bacteria, according to genomics research conducted at York University. The researchers narrowed in on the 'clean' genes known to improve the colony's chance of survival. The finding was published today in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. (2019-02-15)

Culprit found for honeybee deaths in California almond groves
'Fungicides, often needed for crop protection, are routinely used during almond bloom, but in many cases growers were also adding insecticides to the mix. Our research shows that some combinations are deadly to the bees, and the simplest thing is to just take the insecticide out of the equation during almond bloom.' (2019-02-04)

Study shows dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander
Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that the relationship between the Varroa mite and virulence of a virus of honey bees, has been misunderstood. The study challenges the long-held belief that the parasitic Varroa mite transmits the deformed wing virus of honeybees and in doing so changes the virus to make it more virulent and deadly. Research published today concludes that this belief is incorrect. (2019-01-29)

Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators
A team led by entomologists at the University of California, Riverside, performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. The result is a hidden, yet remarkable, change in the genetic diversity of viruses associated with the larger pathogen community of the mite and wasp, with repercussions yet to be understood. (2019-01-08)

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies
Regulators worldwide currently use honeybees as the sole model species failing to account for potential threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species from bumblebees to solitary bees, which are probably more important for pollination of food crops than managed honeybees. They are potentially more vulnerable to pesticides given they nest in the ground and bumblebee queens have different life cycles that could increase exposure. (2018-12-11)

Trees for bees
Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues. And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food. (2018-11-30)

The secret to better berries? Wild bees
New research shows wild bees are essential for producing larger and better blueberry yields - with plumper, faster-ripening berries. The study is the first to show that wild bees improve not only blueberry quantities, but also size and other quality factors. It finds they produce greater berry size (12 percent), quantity (12 percent), size consistency (11 percent), and earlier harvests -- by two and a half days. (2018-11-28)

Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides
Up to 13 percent of US beekeepers are in danger of losing their colonies due to pesticides sprayed to contain the Zika virus, new research suggests. (2018-10-29)

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain
Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. In a new study, researchers found that the stingers of the two species are about five times softer at the tip than at the base to make it easier to pierce skin. The stingers are harder closer to the insect's body so they don't bend too much, or break, as you yelp in agony. (2018-10-08)

DEET scrambles worms' sense of smell
The roundworm C. elegans is sensitive to DEET's insect-repellent effects. The discovery opens up a new genetic toolbox that scientists can use to figure out how DEET works. (2018-09-26)

Epigenetic patterns determine if honeybee larvae become queens or workers
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Australian National University have unravelled how changes in nutrition in the early development of honeybees can result in vastly different adult characteristics. (2018-08-22)

Substances associated with bee ferocity are discovered
Chemical compounds identified by Brazilian researchers may explain why less aggressive bees become ferocious. Study is published in Journal of Proteome Research. (2018-08-14)

Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first
The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth amid the first appearance of flowering plants, new research reveals. (2018-08-07)

Spiders go ballooning on electric fields
The aerodynamic capabilities of spiders have intrigued scientists for hundreds of years. Charles Darwin himself mused over how hundreds of the creatures managed to alight on the Beagle on a calm day out at sea and later take-off from the ship with great speeds on windless day. (2018-07-05)

Asian hornet nests found by radio-tracking
Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian hornets and stop them colonizing the UK and killing honeybees, new research shows. (2018-07-04)

Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do
Researchers have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz. (2018-06-18)

Honeybees zero in on nothing
The number zero is the complex, abstract backbone of modern mathematics and technological advancements and now it's clear that bees are officially in the (2018-06-07)

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