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Current Hormones News and Events, Hormones News Articles.
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Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Many people use cortisone of a regular basis. It is used for treating rheumatism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, or even COVID-19. Steroidal medication such as cortisone is highly effective but also possesses severe side effects. Henriette Uhlenhaut, professor at Technical University of Munich (TUM), and her team are examining the beneficial effects of cortisone in order to lay the groundwork for the development of similar drugs with fewer side effects. (2020-09-02)

Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures. (2020-08-27)

Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants
Strigolactones mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances in the stem of plants of the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata. Their crosstalk with other hormones involved in plant defense is crucial for tobacco plants' ability to tolerate insects that live inside the stem. Plants that are no longer able to produce strigolactones also have altered concentrations of jasmontates and auxins and a reduced resistance against the stem-boring larvae of the weevil Trichobaris mucorea. (2020-08-24)

Tel Aviv University scientists reduce metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery
A research group from Tel Aviv University (TAU) successfully reduced metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery in colorectal cancer patients. Using a short medication treatment around the time of the surgery, the researchers were able to reduce body stress responses and physiological inflammation during this critical period, preventing the development of metastases in the years following the surgery. (2020-08-10)

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants
An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus. (2020-08-05)

Strong relationships in adulthood won't 'fix' effects of early childhood adversity
Harsh conditions in early life are a fundamental cause of adult stress, and according to new research from the University of Notre Dame on wild baboons, this effect is not explained by a lack of social support in adulthood. (2020-08-03)

Exposure to environmental chemicals may disrupt sleep during menopause
For menopausal women who have difficulty sleeping, it might be because of chemicals in the environment. A new study based on data from the Midlife Women's Health Study suggests that exposure to various chemicals, such as phthalates, found in hundreds of products used daily, is associated with sleep disruptions in midlife women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-07-29)

Your brain on birth control
Millions of women have been taking oral contraceptives, but little is known about whether the synthetic hormones found in the oral contraceptives have behavioural and neurophysiological effects, especially during puberty and early adolescence, which are critical periods of brain development. A uOttawa team of researchers found that oral contraceptive use is related to significant structural changes in brain regions implicated in memory and emotional processing. It also alters stress reactivity. (2020-07-28)

Immune system treatment to reduce stress prevents cancer metastases
Tel Aviv University researchers have found that the short time period around tumor removal surgery (the weeks before and after surgery) is critical for the prevention of metastases development, which develop when the body is under stress. (2020-07-22)

New clues from fruit flies about the critical role of sex hormones in stem cell control
In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones' impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone, ecdysone, drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ. (2020-07-08)

'Biologically relevant' levels of a fertility hormone are detected in human hair samples
The prospect of a non-invasive test of ovarian reserve is a little closer following results from a study showing that measurement of a fertility hormone can be accurately taken from a sample of human hair. (2020-07-05)

Patients may be exposed to hormone-disrupting chemicals in medication, medical supplies
Health care providers may unintentionally expose patients to endocrine- disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by prescribing certain medications and using medical supplies, according to a perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-07-02)

Fat check: Yale researchers find explanation for stress' damage in brown fat
In their search for what triggers the damaging side-effects caused by acute psychological stress, Yale researchers found an answer by doing a fat check. In the face of psychological stress, an immune system response that can significantly worsen inflammatory responses originates in brown fat cells, the Yale team reports June 30 in the journal Cell. (2020-06-30)

New approach drives bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds
Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of the drugs actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches. The scientists report their findings in the journal eLife. (2020-06-25)

Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish
Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers. (2020-06-24)

Genetic analysis suggests distinct subtypes of polycystic ovary syndrome
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), an infertility disorder affecting at least 15% of reproductive-age women, may have at least two different subtypes, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings could provide important information on the possible causes of PCOS and for developing more effective ways to treat the condition. (2020-06-23)

NIH-funded study links endometriosis to DNA changes
DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. The changes involve DNA methylation--the binding of compounds known as methyl groups to DNA--which can alter gene activity. (2020-06-17)

The balancing act between plant growth and defense
Kumamoto University researchers have pinpointed the mechanism that regulates the balance between plant growth and defense. Excessive accumulation of hormones that protect against pathogen infection significantly hinders plant growth. Researchers found that the DEL1 gene plays a role in balancing growth and defense of plants infected with nematodes. This finding is expected to contribute to the improvement of agricultural crop varieties and the identification of infection mechanisms of various pathogens. (2020-06-16)

Different hormone therapies affect brain function differently
Sex hormones influence the structure and function of the brain, but little is known about the effect of hormone therapies (HT) on changes in the brain during menopause. A new study shows smaller increases in structural brain changes related to aging were associated with hormone-level changes from transdermal estradiol or oral conjugated equine estrogen. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-06-10)

High uric acid levels benefit women's lungs in aging and disease
Researchers at Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered that uric acid, an antioxidant, protects against declining lung function, especially in women. High uric acid levels can cause health problems, but this study showed that it protects against lung function decline in females. The function of uric acid and other antioxidants in the lungs, as well as gender differences, will likely be considered for prospective management of lung diseases. (2020-06-05)

Something in the water: Environmental pollutant may be more hazardous than previously thought
Sometimes toxins, such as hazardous wastes and industrial byproducts, seep into groundwater, the source of our drinking water. One such pollutant is perchlorate, a chemical compound used in rocket fuels, fireworks, fertilizers and other materials. The compound is thought to contribute to health issues in humans such as hypothyroidism, the decreased production of hormones from the thyroid gland, which can impact development. (2020-06-05)

Something in the water: Pollutant may be more hazardous than previously thought
Perchlorate, a chemical compound used in rocket fuels and other materials, may be a more hazardous pollutant than previously thought, says a new study from Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2020-06-05)

How a male fly knows when to make a move on a mate
Like people, fruit flies must decide when conditions are right to make a move on a mate. Males use age and odors to gauge their chances of success, but how they do that on a molecular level was a mystery. The answer lies, in part, in their DNA. Researchers find that the scent of other flies and internal hormones alter the activity of a gene that controls how turned on male flies are by pheromones. (2020-05-22)

Deciphering the fine neuroendocrine regulatory system during development
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Crz is a key molecule for body size adjustment during the larval stage. Using Drosophila melanogaster, they demonstrated that Crz controls basal ecdysteroid biosynthesis by acting on PTTH-producing neurons during only a specific larval stage to facilitate larval transition to the next stage. These findings help understand how growth and maturation are regulated during development. (2020-05-20)

A deep look into the gut's hormones
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University generated an in-depth description of the human hormone-producing cells of the gut. These cells are difficult to study, as they are very rare and unique to different species of animals. The researchers developed tools to study human hormone-producing cells in mini-guts grown in the lab, called organoids. Their findings offer potential new avenues for the treatment of diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. (2020-05-13)

Genes may play a role in weight gain from birth control
A woman's genetic make-up may cause her to gain weight when using a popular form of birth control, according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-05-12)

Researchers achieve remote control of hormone release
Using magnetic nanoparticles, scientists stimulate the adrenal gland in rodents to control release of hormones linked to stress. (2020-04-17)

Hormone produced in starved leaves stimulates roots to take up nitrogen
A new study at Nagoya University has highlighted the extraordinary ability of plants to communicate between their shoots and roots to prevent starvation. (2020-04-09)

Vexing Nemo: Motorboat noise makes clownfish stressed and aggressive
Working on the reefs around Moorea in French Polynesia, an international team of scientists exposed 40 pairs of clownfish to recordings of natural reef sounds or motorboat noise for up to two days. Motorboat noise caused clownfish to hide in the protective tentacles of their host anemone, move less into open water to feed and to be more aggressive towards domino damselfish that also reside in the anemone. (2020-04-08)

Fracking chemical may interfere with male sex hormone receptor
A chemical used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, has the potential to interfere with reproductive hormones in men, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)

Experiences of undesired effects of hormonal contraception
A study of women who experienced mental ill-health from a hormonal contraception indicates they value their mental well-being higher than a satisfactory sex life. Their experiences can influence their choice of contraception. This is one of four themes that researchers have identified in interviews with 24 women who experience negative effects of some hormonal contraception. The study, from Linköping University in Sweden, has been published in the European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. (2020-03-31)

Two hormones drive anemonefish fathering, aggression
Two brain-signaling molecules control how anemonefish dads care for their young and respond to nest intruders, researchers report in a new study. Because there are many similarities in brain structure between fish and humans, the findings offer insight into the fundamental nature of parental care, the scientists say. (2020-03-16)

The discovery of a new gene that 'supervises' strawberry ripening
For the first time, a University of Cordoba research group has characterized a transcription factor that modulates more than 600 genes involved in strawberry ripening (2020-03-13)

Hair in 'stress': Analyze with care
Similar to humans, wild animals' reaction to disturbance is accompanied by releasing hormones, such as cortisol. To understand the impact of various 'stress' factors on wildlife, scientists first need to determine the baseline levels of relevant hormones for each species. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now uncovered possible pitfalls of the commonly used hormone analysis method that overestimate concentrations of cortisol and thus lead to overstated conclusions. (2020-03-12)

Age at menopause not linked to conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors
The age at which a woman's periods stop, and the menopause starts, doesn't seem to be linked to the development of the risk factors typically associated with cardiovascular disease, suggests research published online in the journal Heart. (2020-02-25)

A better pregnancy test for whales
To determine whale pregnancy, researchers have relied on visual cues or hormone tests of blubber collected via darts, but the results were often inconclusive. Research from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) points to a weakness of previous testing and evaluation methods and provides a new hormone testing regime that offers better results. (2020-02-20)

Research shows the way to more efficient EPO production
EPO, an important drug for treating anemia, can now be produced in higher quantities and with better quality in mammalian cells designed using CRISPR. (2020-02-19)

First baby born to cancer patient from eggs matured in the lab and frozen
Fertility doctors in France have announced the birth of the first baby to be born to a cancer patient from an immature egg that was matured in the laboratory, frozen, then thawed and fertilized five years later. The report is published in Annals of Oncology. (2020-02-18)

Holstein steers that get hormone implants perform as well as implanted beef cows
Holstein steers that get hormone implants grow faster than those that do not receive the implants, and they get as big as beef cattle breeds, according to Penn State researchers, who say that's good news for dairy farmers struggling to keep their operations financially viable. (2020-02-14)

Sex hormone-related protein levels may impact stroke risk in women
Women with lower blood levels of a protein that binds to and transports sex hormones like estradiol and testosterone may have a higher risk of ischemic stroke. Hormonal biomarkers may someday improve the ability to predict ischemic stroke risk in women. (2020-02-12)

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