Current Housework News and Events

Current Housework News and Events, Housework News Articles.
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The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

Poor health contributing to digital divide among older Singaporeans
Singapore's many ambitious digital inclusion initiatives are doing a lot to arm all Singaporeans with digital skills and literacy to go online safely and confidently. While it is commonly assumed that older adults do not use the internet mainly because they lack internet access or digital skills, scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and University of Massachusetts, found that one in 15 older Singaporeans, aged 60 years and older, face additional difficulty in using the internet because of poor health. (2020-09-15)

Women's burden increases in COVID-19 era
The triple burden endured by women -- in productive, reproductive and community roles -- has been exposed and intensified due to COVID-19-enforced lockdown and quarantine restrictions. (2020-07-21)

Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -- not improved -- the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers. (2020-07-13)

Numerous jobs linked to increased risk of knee reconstruction
A major review of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to knee surgery, pain and loss of mobility, reveals widespread risk of OA, demonstrating a need for prevention outside of traditional workplaces. It the biggest meta-analysis and systematic review of the potentially debilitating knee OA and the first systematic review into the association between job 'titles' and knee OA - finding Increased risk in farmers, construction workers, miners, service workers, houseworkers (i.e. housewives) and cleaners. (2020-07-08)

Women's communication shapes division of labor in household
For many couples, COVID-19 quarantine has shattered the normal routine and led some to renegotiate who does what around the house. A new study led a team that analyzed the role that communication plays in the division of household labor. They found that partner communication is the most important factor linking the division of household labor to satisfaction in the relationship. But the way that the partners' communication matters depends on gender. (2020-06-09)

Replacing time spent sitting with sleep or light activity may improve your mood
New research, published by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that substituting prolonged sedentary time with sleep was associated with lower stress, better mood and lower body mass index (BMI), and substituting light physical activity was associated with improved mood and lower BMI across the next year. (2020-05-20)

Physically active older veterans fall more, but hurt themselves less
Active older veterans fall more often than their more sedentary peers who never served in the armed forces, but they're less likely to injure themselves when they do, says a University of Michigan researcher. (2020-04-14)

Time spent watching television does not replace physical activity for Finnish men
A large proportion of highly active men watch more television than their low-active peers do. In contrast, highly active women watch less television than low-active women do. (2020-02-12)

Benefits of electrification don't accrue equally for women, finds survey of homes in India
As households gain access to electricity, gender inequality persists in how energy is used. New research from Carnegie Mellon University examines the link between the sustainable development goals of energy access and gender equality. (2019-12-23)

Women need professional emotional support during high-risk pregnancies, study finds
Little is known about how women manage emotional distress during high-risk pregnancies, but Rutgers researchers learned that without psychosocial support, women struggle with fears and tears while feeling isolated and worried. (2019-12-16)

Progressive gender views may protect health of financially dependent men
Men who were financially dependent on their wives and who also had more traditional beliefs about gender roles tended to have higher 'allostatic loads,' or wear and tear on the body as the result of stress. Men who had more 'egalitarian' or progressive views about gender seemed to be protected from this effect. (2019-11-25)

'Smart shirt' can accurately measure breathing and could be used to monitor lung disease
A smart shirt that measures lung function by sensing movements in the chest and abdomen has proved to be accurate when compared to traditional testing equipment, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (2019-09-29)

Changing partners doesn't change relationship dynamics, study shows
New romances eventually follow patterns similar to old ones, according to U of A relationship researcher who led eight-year study. (2019-08-27)

Sensory impairment and health expectancy in older adults
Older adults aged 60 years and above with vision and hearing impairments may enjoy fewer years of life as well as healthy life compared to those with no impairments. Detecting and managing these conditions early could prolong the duration of life lived in good health by older adults, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) in Singapore. (2019-08-15)

Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. A new study by Lancaster University reveals the way in which couples manage their money tells 'a tale of two marriages' in the UK today. (2019-06-24)

Older adults with obesity may have fewer years of healthy life
A study by researchers at Duke-NUS, conducted of older Singaporeans (above 60 years) showed that those with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) might have the same number of remaining years of life compared to those with a lower BMI, but spend fewer of those years in good health. (2019-05-08)

Moving more in old age may be linked to sharper memory
Older adults who move more, either with daily exercise or even simple routine physical activity like housework, may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-01-16)

Moving more in old age may protect brain from dementia
lder adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-01-16)

Studies in men reveal higher chance of secondary fractures, value of bone strengthening exercises
Two new studies released this week shine a spotlight on men's bone health which is often overshadowed by the focus on osteoporosis and fracture risk in women. The findings are being presented at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) 2018 Annual Meeting in Montréal, the premier scientific meeting in the world on bone, mineral and musculoskeletal science. (2018-09-30)

Disaster leaves unexpected impact on rural Japan's marriage migrants
The devastating 2011 tsunami that struck the northeast of Japan led to a surprising outcome -- empowering some migrant women, while further isolating others. (2018-09-04)

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling -- that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace -- remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy. (2018-08-22)

Men take care of their spouses just as well as women (new research suggests)
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. (2018-08-10)

Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of aging
Study looked at 46 women across two different age ranges, 60-74 and 75-90, to learn how physical activity affects frailty differently in the two groups. (2018-04-23)

Any physical activity in elderly better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk
Any physical activity in the elderly is better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk, according to an 18-year study in more than 24,000 adults published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (2017-11-22)

Dads are often having fun while moms work around the house
For the first time, researchers have evidence of exactly what dads are doing while moms are taking care of housework or tending to their child. The results will be disappointing for those who expected more gender equity in modern society. (2017-10-09)

Household chores: Women still do more
Canadian women of all ages still tend to do more household chores than their male partners, no matter how much they work or earn in a job outside the home. Findings from a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles demonstrate the persistent gendered nature of how housework is divided, says lead author Rebecca Horne of the University of Alberta in Canada. (2017-09-26)

Regular exercise, not BMI, before stroke may predict disability later
A new study suggests it's the amount of regular exercise people get, not the amount of body fat they have, that may predict just how well they recover from a stroke. The study is published in the April 5, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2017-04-05)

Benefits of physical activity may outweigh impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease
The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years. (2017-03-01)

Helping pays off: People who care for others live longer
Older people who help and support others live longer. These are the findings of a study published in the journal 'Evolution and Human Behavior,' conducted by researchers from the University of Basel, Edith Cowan University, the University of Western Australia, the Humboldt University of Berlin, and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. (2016-12-22)

Being more like men does not help women in STEM careers
Even when women were more like men 20 to 40 years ago, it didn't help them get a job in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, says Sassler, professor of policy analysis and management. (2016-11-02)

Sex and gender more important than income in determining views on division of chores
For heterosexual couples, most Americans still believe in the traditional division of household labor between husbands and wives, while for same-sex couples, they think the 'more masculine' partner and the 'more feminine' partner should generally be responsible for stereotypically male and female chores, respectively, suggests a new study. (2016-08-21)

Being the primary breadwinner is bad for men's psychological well-being and health
Gendered expectations in marriage are not just bad for women, they are also bad for men, according to a new study by University of Connecticut sociologists. (2016-08-19)

Modeling mood swings
Scientists developed a smart phone app to collect large-scale data about human behavior and demonstrate how humans routinely sacrifice their short-term happiness for their long-term welfare. (2016-08-17)

Sedentary time may raise heart disease risk -- sit less, move more
Sedentary time -- even among physically active people -- may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more. (2016-08-15)

Higher weekly activity levels linked to lower risk of 5 chronic diseases
Higher levels of total physical activity are strongly associated with lower risk of five common chronic diseases -- breast and bowel cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2016-08-09)

Study finds couples' division of paid and unpaid labor linked to risk of divorce
A new study suggests that financial factors, including couples' overall resources and wives' ability to support themselves in the event of a divorce, are not predictive of whether marriages last. Rather, it is couples' division of labor -- paid and unpaid -- that is associated with the risk of divorce. (2016-07-28)

Longer life, disability free
Harvard researchers are among the co-authors of a new study that shows that the increase in life expectancy in the past two decades has been accompanied by an even greater increase in life years free of disability, thanks in large measure to improvements in cardiovascular health and declines in vision problems. (2016-06-06)

Book examines commodification of feelings, love in Tokyo's host clubs
In the decades after Japan's prosperous Bubble economy burst, the male hosting phenomenon has taken off. Host clubs have created an avenue for young men to get rich relatively quickly. (2016-03-07)

Can social support be a bad thing for older adults?
A recent study conducted by Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) researchers suggests that social support from family and friends does not have an entirely positive effect on mental health but is instead a 'mixed blessing.' This is the first study that demonstrates the simultaneous negative and positive effects of social support among Singaporean older adults and has implications for policy makers. (2016-03-04)

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