Current Human Behavior News and Events

Current Human Behavior News and Events, Human Behavior News Articles.
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Focus on the positive to improve classroom behavior
When teachers encounter disruptive or noncompliant students in the classroom, they typically respond by focusing on the negative behavior. (2021-02-22)

Helping behavior may mitigate academic risk for children from low-income neighborhoods
Children raised in neighborhoods with low socio-economic status are at risk for low academic achievement. A new longitudinal study followed young children from such neighborhoods from birth until age seven to explore whether children's capacity to act kindly or generously towards others (prosocial behavior) - including peers, teachers, and family - is linked to their ability to perform well in school. The study showed that prosocial behavior may mitigate academic risk across early childhood. (2021-02-17)

How the 'noise' in our brain influences our behavior
The brain's neural activity is irregular, changing from one moment to the next. To date, this apparent ''noise'' has been thought to be due to random natural variations or measurement error. However, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development have shown that this neural variability may provide a unique window into brain function. (2021-02-17)

Regional variation in the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed human behavior, and that has major consequences for data-gathering citizen-science projects such as eBird, run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. New research finds that when human behaviors change, so do the data. (2021-02-15)

Microbiota transfer therapy for autism: Multi-omic approaches and lessons learned
Recent studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing links between the composition of gut microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a disease believed to affect one in 54 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Krajmalnik-Brown's lecture will propose linkages between gut bacteria and ASD, highlighting encouraging results of a microbiome-targeted, ASD open-label clinical trial. (2021-02-08)

States with more gun laws have lower youth gun violence, Rutgers study finds
Gun violence among children is lower in states with more gun laws, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2021-02-04)

A personal benefit of social distancing: lower odds of getting COVID-19
Considering the greater good by social distancing during a pandemic turns out to have an attractive personal benefit: A new study has found that staying away from others also reduces an individual person's chances of contracting COVID-19. (2021-02-04)

Specific bacteria in the gut prompt mother mice to neglect their pups
As scientists learn more about the microorganisms that colonize the body--collectively called the microbiota--one area of intense interest is the effect that these microbes can have on the brain. A new study led by Salk Institute scientists has identified a strain of E. coli bacteria that, when living in the guts of female mice, causes them to neglect their offspring. The findings were published January 29, 2021, in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-29)

Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows. The study combines genetic information and brain scans from more than 25,000 people for the first time. (2021-01-28)

Scientists identify individual neurons responsible for complex social reasoning in humans
Until now, how neurons represent another individual's belief and thoughts was unknown. Prior to undergoing planned neurosurgery, patients agreed to perform brief behavioral tasks as neuroscientists recorded the activity of individual neurons. The study revealed the basic cellular mechanism involved in a fundamental cognitive process vital to successful social interactions. Now researchers have a framework to investigate disorders in which social behavior is affected. (2021-01-27)

Competition among human females likely contributed to concealed ovulation
Humans are among the few species that lack overt physical indicators of female fertility. One explanation for concealed ovulation in human females is that hiding fertility from males helps females secure resources from males for raising children. A new model developed by a team of evolutionary scientists casts doubt on this idea, showing that females might have evolved to conceal ovulation from one another, not from males. (2021-01-25)

Study highlights factors that predict success for treating canine behavioral disorders
Canine behavioral problems are one of the leading causes of why pets are abandoned at shelters. Researchers have identified some of the key factors in both dogs and their owners that predict the success or failure of clinical interventions to correct problems like aggression or separation anxiety. This information may be valuable for veterinarians to provide better guidance to dog owners in future cases that require clinical intervention. (2021-01-22)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

"Smiling eyes" may not signify true happiness after all
A smile that lifts the cheeks and crinkles the eyes is thought by many to be truly genuine. But new research at Carnegie Mellon University casts doubt on whether this joyful facial expression necessarily tells others how a person really feels inside. (2021-01-20)

Certain parenting behaviors associated with positive changes in well-being during COVID-19 pandemic
A new longitudinal study in Germany examined day-to-day parenting behavior during the restrictions and closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic from the end of March until the end of April 2020. Research showed that autonomy-supportive parenting (offering meaningful choices when possible) contributed to positive well-being for both children and parents. (2021-01-19)

Of the honey bee dance
Honey bees are unique in that they not only alert their nestmates but have also evolved a symbolic communication in the form of a dance - a waggle dance. (2021-01-18)

How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that control muscle tone. Inhibiting these neuronal cells caused mice to move during REM sleep, reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorders. These neurons were also responsible for episodes of cataplexy in a mouse model of narcolepsy; inhibiting them reduced the number of cataplexic bouts. These circuits could thus be a new target for treating these sleep disorders. (2021-01-14)

Behavioral traits converge for humans and animals sharing an environment
Humans, mammals and birds that live in a particular environment share a common set of behavioral traits, according to a new study, which identifies a local convergence of foraging, reproductive and social behaviors across species. (2021-01-14)

What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation. (2021-01-13)

Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth (2021-01-13)

Do toddlers learning to spoon-feed seek different information from caregivers' hands & faces?
When toddlers begin to use a spoon to eat by themselves, what kind of interactions facilitate this behavior? To find out, an international research collaboration led by Kobe University's Professor NONAKA Tetsushi and the University of Minnesota's Professor Thomas A. Stoffregen investigated the interactions between toddlers and their caregivers during mealtimes at a daycare center in Japan. (2020-12-27)

Brain gene expression patterns predict behavior of individual honey bees
An unusual study that involved bar coding and tracking the behavior of thousands of individual honey bees in six queenless bee hives and analyzing gene expression in their brains offers new insights into how gene regulation contributes to social behavior. (2020-12-22)

Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers (2020-12-21)

CAPTUREing Whole-Body 3D movements
Neuroscientists have made major advances in their quest to study the brain; however, there are no tools to precisely measure the brain's principal output -- behavior -- in freely moving animals. Researchers at Harvard University present CAPTURE, a new method for long-term continuous three-dimension motion tracking in freely behaving animals. Attaching markers to rats' head, trunk, and limbs, researchers can use CAPTURE to record the animal's natural behavior continuously for weeks. (2020-12-18)

Monkeys, like humans, persist at tasks they've already invested in
Humans are generally reluctant to give up on something they've already committed time and effort to. It's called the ''sunk costs'' phenomenon, where the more resources we sink into an endeavor, the likelier we are to continue--even if we sense it's futile. A new study shows that both capuchin monkeys and rhesus macaques are susceptible to the same behavior and that it occurs more often when the monkeys are uncertain about the outcome. (2020-12-18)

Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the 'skin' that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering. (2020-12-17)

Tension between awareness and fatigue shapes Covid-19 spread
In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, two human factors are battling it out: awareness of the virus's severe consequences and fatigue from nine months of pandemic precautions. The results of that battle can be seen in the oddly shaped case, hospitalization, and fatality-count graphs, a new study suggests. (2020-12-08)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts. (2020-11-23)

Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines 'sexual disturbance,' or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female -- for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review. (2020-11-18)

Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
DSI postdoctoral fellow Sandrine Müller uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior. (2020-11-16)

Two genes regulate social dominance
Using the Nobel Prize gene-editing technique, a University of Houston researcher has found that two genes regulate social dominance in cichlid fish and - possibly - humans. (2020-11-10)

No matter the size of a nuclear party, some protons and neutrons will pair up and dance
No matter the size of a nuclear party, certain protons and neutrons will always pair up and dance, a new MIT study finds. The results will help map the workings within neutron stars and heavy radioactive nuclei. (2020-11-09)

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution. Although the studied cockroaches displayed novel wing-flapping behavior prior to copulation, similarities in other mating habits, egg sac handling, and embryonic development between Nocticolidae and sister family Corydiidae suggested that the two groups share a common ancestor. Elucidating these relationships will help infer the evolutionary history of modern-day insects. (2020-11-05)

Victims of school bullying are more prone to develope violent behavior in the future
A University of Cordoba and University of Cambridge study analyzed what factors in childhood and adolescence increase the likelihood of having violent behavior in adulthood (2020-11-04)

Hot or cold, weather alone has no significant effect on COVID-19 spread
Research led by The University of Texas at Austin is adding some clarity on weather's role in COVID-19 infection, with a new study finding that temperature and humidity do not play a significant role in coronavirus spread. (2020-11-02)

Depression, social anxiety, and use of mobile dating apps
Depression symptoms and social anxiety are associated with greater use of mobile dating applications among women (2020-11-02)

Vampire bats social distance when they get sick
A new paper in Behavioral Ecology finds that wild vampire bats that are sick spend less time near others from their community, which slows how quickly a disease will spread. The research team had previously seen this behavior in the lab, and used a field experiment to confirm it in the wild. (2020-10-27)

Big-hearted corvids
Taking a look at generosity within the crow family reveals parallels with human evolution. Working together to raise offspring and increased tolerance towards group members contribute to the emergence of generous behavior among ravens, crows, magpies and company. Lisa Horn of the Department of Behavioral and Cognitive Biology found that the social life of corvids is a crucial factor for whether the birds act generously or not. The results have been published in ''eLife''. (2020-10-22)

Nasal septum surgery can affect behaviour, say medics from RUDN University
A team of medics from RUDN University conducted an experiment on rats and confirmed that surgeries in the nasal cavity can cause behavioral changes, namely, make the animals timider. This effect is associated with an ANS reaction triggered by stress. (2020-10-22)

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