Current Human Rights News and Events

Current Human Rights News and Events, Human Rights News Articles.
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Using human rights laws may be most effective way of harnessing international legislation to protect
Using laws governing human rights may be the best way of harnessing international legislation and tribunals to protect the Amazon, a new study shows. (2021-02-22)

It's morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine
Rich nations should not engage in ''vaccine nationalism'' and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun's paper, ''Against Vaccine Nationalism,'' was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2021-02-16)

Rapid, reliable on-site drug detection using wearable sensor
Researchers in South Korea have successfully developed a wearable sensor that can detect illegal drugs in sweat by using nanomaterials technology that amplify the optical signal of narcotics to a flexible, body-worn material. The technology enables fast and highly sensitive drug detection: the sweat patch is attached to the skin for a certain period of time and then irradiated with light for testing. It only takes one minute without requiring additional process. (2021-02-08)

Voters perceive political candidates with a disability as qualified for elected office
Political candidates with a disability have historically been underrepresented. A new study has found for the first time that voters do not apply certain stereotypes associated with disability to such candidates. Voters see them as honest, hard-working, and concerned with social welfare issues. The results show that the cause of under-representation may not lay with voters' perceptions, but with a lack of support from governments and political parties. (2021-01-28)

Size matters: How the size of a male's weapons affects its anti-predator tactics
When males have to fight for reproductive rights, having larger weapons such as horns gives them an edge. However, this can also limit their mobility, making them more vulnerable to predators. In a recent study, scientists from Japan proved, for the first time, that males of a species adopt different anti-predator tactics--tonic immobility or escape--based on the size of their weapons, opening doors to a better understanding of the evolution of animal behaviors. (2021-01-28)

Internet and freedom of speech, when metaphors give too much power
Since 1997, when the US supreme court metaphorically called the Internet the free market of ideas, attempts at regulation have been blocked by the 1st amendment. But with power concentrated in a few platforms, that metaphor is now misleading, says a study by Bocconi's Oreste Pollicino (2021-01-21)

Study finds bilateral agreements help developing economies spur foreign investment
Developing economies suffer from a paradox: they don't receive investment flows from developed economies because they lack stability and high-quality financial and lawmaking institutions, but they can't develop those institutions without foreign funds. A new study finds that bilateral investment treaties, known as BITs, can help developing economies overcome this paradox, but only as long as those countries can demonstrate a commitment to property and contract rights. (2021-01-21)

Indigenous lands: A haven for wildlife
Indigenous peoples' lands may harbour a significant proportion of threatened and endangered species globally, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2021-01-20)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

Estonian-led international network publishes first study of growing influence of social media
The Global Digital Human Rights Network has published a study on the growing role of social media in the processing of information and the fight against misinformation related to COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Index reveals integrity issues for many of the world's forests
Only 40 per cent of forests are considered to have high ecological integrity, according to a new global measure, the Forest Landscape Integrity Index. The Index was created by 47 forest and conservation experts from across the world, including Professor James Watson of The University of Queensland and the Wildlife Conservation Society. (2020-12-09)

Immunity passports: Ethical conflict and opportunity
Ikerbasque Research Professor Iñigo de Miguel Beriain, who works with the UPV/EHU Chair in Law and the Human Genome, defends the usefulness of immunity passports, providing they are used to protect the rights of those who are immune. He also warns that vaccine distribution will create similar problems related to immunity-based licenses. (2020-12-04)

Use of controversial restrains varies wildly across the Pacific
Despite being considered a form of torture, and policies to reduce or abolish it in place, the use of mechanical restraints in psychiatric settings continues, a University of Otago-led study shows. (2020-12-03)

51% of Americans agree paying college athletes should be allowed
More Americans than not believe that college athletes should be allowed to be paid more than what it costs them to go to school, a new national study of nearly 4,000 people suggests. Findings from the National Sports and Society Survey (NSASS) suggest that 51 percent of adults agree that college athletes should have the ability to be paid above school costs, 41 percent disagree and 8 percent don't know. (2020-11-24)

Study examines remission of obesity-related complications in teens after bariatric surgery
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have shown that, with the exception of cholesterol and triglyceride levels, remission of obesity-related complications in teens following bariatric surgery was not dependent on major sustained weight loss. Rather, a majority of adolescents benefited from such remission whether or not they lost a significant amount of weight. (2020-11-24)

'Extremely aggressive' internet censorship spreads in the world's democracies
The largest collection of public internet censorship data ever compiled shows that even citizens of what are considered the world's freest countries aren't safe from internet censorship. (2020-11-17)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Recommendations for fair and regulated access to a COVID-19 vaccine
The first COVID-19 vaccines could be authorized as early as the start of 2021. However, in all likelihood, there will not be sufficient vaccine doses in the beginning for all the people willing to undergo vaccination. This is why prioritization will be necessary. In the position paper published today, medical-epidemiological aspects of infection prevention are presented alongside ethical, legal and practical considerations. On this basis, the authors develop a framework for action for the initial prioritization of vaccination measures against COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

Formal community forest management policies often lead to reduced access, resource rights
The most comprehensive global analysis of community forestry ever undertaken shows that government policies formalizing local residents' land access and resource rights often backfire by resulting in less access and weakened rights. (2020-11-09)

Global analysis of forest management shows local communities often lose out
Maintaining forest cover is an important natural climate solution, but new research shows that too often, communities lose out when local forest management is formalised. The new study published today in Nature Sustainability, led by Dr Johan Oldepkop at The University of Manchester and Reem Hajjar at Oregon State University, is based on 643 case studies of community forest management (CFM) in 51 different countries, from 267 peer-reviewed studies. (2020-11-09)

Ecological "big-data" reveals insights into a changing arctic
The Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA) - a new ecological dataset, which combines three decades of animal tracking studies from across the Arctic - provides a powerful new ecological tool to understand the rapidly changing region better. (2020-11-05)

CU Denver study looks into the connection between religion and equal pay
Traci Sitzmann, an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver Business School, and Elizabeth Campbell, an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, provide empirical evidence and an explanation into why religion perpetuates the gender wage gap. (2020-10-28)

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender. Narratives from both Republican and Democratic candidates in 48 U.S. House campaigns from the 2018 midterm election were analyzed in this study. (2020-10-26)

When reproductive rights are less restrictive, babies are born healthier
American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. The findings show that women, particularly US-born Black women, giving birth in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies have a seven percent lower low-birth weight risk, compared to women in states with more restrictive policies. (2020-10-13)

Excess deaths from COVID-19, community bereavement, restorative justice for communities of color
Ways the COVID-19 pandemic has compounded existing health, human rights and economic disparities in communities of color are discussed in this Viewpoint, which also proposes a program of restorative justice in response, comprising investments in education and housing, reforms in lending practices and criminal justice, and more. (2020-10-12)

First rehoming of laboratory dogs in Finland successful but required a great deal of work
Researchers at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Helsinki monitored the success of rehoming 16 laboratory beagles in 2015-2018. The study revealed that the development of toilet training skills could be supported by care arrangements at the laboratory animal facilities. (2020-10-05)

Evaluating impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns on children and young people
Children, who appear at a relatively lower risk from COVID-19, are disproportionally harmed by precautions involved with lockdowns, say Matthew Snape and Russell Viner in a Perspective. (2020-09-21)

Trump must contend with a mobilized religious left, new research finds
With the 2020 presidential election on the near horizon, Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein discusses what he and his co-researcher learned about the political engagement of U.S. congregations -- and how that may impact results on Nov. 3. (2020-09-17)

Amid pandemic and protests, Americans know much more about their rights
In a period defined by an impeachment inquiry, a pandemic, nationwide protests over racial injustice, and a contentious presidential campaign, Americans' knowledge of their First Amendment rights and their ability to name all three branches of the federal government have markedly increased, according to the 2020 Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey. (2020-09-14)

Tear gas should be banned, researchers find; here's why
Tear gas should be banned as it is inherently indiscriminate and frequently abused when deployed against peaceful assemblies, in enclosed spaces, in excessive quantities and against vulnerable populations. It cannot distinguish between the young and the elderly, the healthy and the sick, the peaceful and the violent. Its deployment can also cause myriad health harms, including severe injuries and death. (2020-09-03)

COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights. The pandemic has revealed the lack of systematic and uniform protection of voting rights in the United States. (2020-09-02)

Restoring the world's forests requires partnering with local communities
Global forest restoration is a critical strategy for removing carbon from the atmosphere but its success depends on empowering local communities, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-08-25)

Global forest restoration and the importance of empowering local communities
Forest restoration is a crucial element in strategies to mitigate climate change and conserve global biodiversity in the coming decades, and much of the focus is on formerly tree-covered lands in the tropics. (2020-08-24)

Rates of dog bites in children up during COVID-19 pandemic
Greater rates of Colorado's children are going to the pediatric emergency department as a result of dog bites during the COVID-19 pandemic. The incidence of visits for dog bites to Children's Hospital Colorado's emergency department in spring 2020 was nearly triple that of last year's rates at the same time. Moreover, high rates of dog bite injuries have continued even as statewide stay-at-home orders have relaxed over time. (2020-08-11)

Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest
One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest - and help in the global fight against climate change - is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands. This policy focus is suggested by the findings of a new study in PNAS. (2020-08-10)

Researchers say where you live could add years to your life
Could where you live dictate how long you live? New research at Syracuse University's Maxwell School, published today in the Milbank Quarterly, shows Americans who live in so-called blue states tend to live longer than those in red states, primarily due to state policies. (2020-08-04)

Anti-bullying PEACE program packs a punch
Italian high schools have reported success with a South Australian program to help victims of bullying and aggression. The Preparation, Education. Action, Coping, Evaluation (PEACE) antibullying program, developed at Flinders University, has been adapted by several state education systems in Europe, with the intervention used in 22 Italian classes in a 2019-20 study. (2020-08-03)

The need for progressive national narratives
The recent rise of authoritarian nationalist movements has reinforced the tendency of many on the left, and some on the right, to reject all forms of nationalism, writes Rogers M. Smith in ''Toward Progressive Narratives of American Identity,'' published in Polity's May Symposium on the Challenges Facing Democrats. (2020-07-31)

Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
A new study from the University of Helsinki shows that Indigenous territories represent around 45% of all the remaining wilderness areas in the Amazon, comprising an area of three times the surface of Germany. At a time when the Amazon forests face unprecedented pressures, overcoming divergences and aligning the goals of wilderness defenders and Indigenous peoples is paramount to avoid further environmental degradation. (2020-07-29)

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