Current Hunger News and Events

Current Hunger News and Events, Hunger News Articles.
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Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this is the first time it has been used to study the perception of satiety (2021-02-22)

'Gamechanger' drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20%
One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers. (2021-02-10)

Scientists to global policymakers: Treat fish as food to help solve world hunger
Fish provide 17% of the animal protein consumed globally and are rich in micronutrients and essential fatty acids. In Ambio experts argue seeing fish in a food system perspective. (2021-01-19)

Tiny wireless device sheds light on combating obesity
In a new study, researchers at Texas A&M University have described a medical device that might help with weight loss and requires a simpler operative procedure for implantation. (2021-01-08)

Latina mothers, often essential workers, report COVID-19 took toll
More than half of Latina mothers surveyed in Yolo and Sacramento counties reported making economic cutbacks in response to the pandemic shutdown last spring -- saying they bought less food and missed rent payments. Hardships were not reduced by stimulus checks. (2021-01-08)

A hunger for social contact
MIT neuroscientists have found that the longings for social interaction felt during isolation are neurologically very similar to the food cravings people experience when hungry. (2020-11-23)

College students are less food insecure than non-students
College students are significantly less likely to be food insecure than non-students in the same age group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois. (2020-11-19)

Home-visiting program shows promise of reducing risk of obesity among Native American children
Lessons on healthy feeding practices delivered to young mothers through a brief home-visiting intervention put Native American infants on a healthier growth trajectory, lowering their risks for obesity. (2020-11-09)

To predict how crops cope with changing climate, 30 years of experiments simulate future
Today, a review published in Global Change Biology synthesizes 30 years of 'Free-Air Concentration Enrichment' (FACE) data to grasp how global crop production may be impacted by rising CO2 levels and other factors. The study portends a less optimistic future than the authors' previous review published 15 years ago in New Phytologist. (2020-11-02)

Turning streetwear into solar power plants
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich succeeded in developing a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles. This opens up numerous possibilities for producing energy directly where it is needed, i.e. in the use of everyday electronics. (2020-10-22)

Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected. (2020-10-19)

Donors more likely to give to COVID causes when font matches message
Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found. (2020-10-06)

Algorithm boosts efficiency, nutrition for food bank ops
Cornell University systems engineers examined data from a busy New York state food bank and, using a new algorithm, found ways to better allocate food and elevate nutrition in the process. (2020-09-17)

Malnutrition among a hunter-gatherer group
The diets of hunter-gatherers are changing at a fast pace, as in the contemporary world, they are increasingly being deprived of their access to land and natural resources and urged to adapt to sedentary lifestyle. An interdisciplinary study from the University of Helsinki brings forth the underlying causes of food and nutrition insecurity among a San group in Namibia. (2020-09-09)

Elevated "hunger" hormone leaves trauma-exposed teens at higher risk for PTSD
Research suggests that acyl-ghrelin is an especially predictive biomarker of PTSD. (2020-08-20)

Improving protein digestibility in sorghum
Improving protein digestibility in sorghum (2020-08-19)

Poverty alleviation efforts are shaping the success of environmental targets
Social protection programs can facilitate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but can also create trade-offs across divergent social and environmental goals that can undermine their effectiveness, say the authors of new research published in the journal PNAS. This is one of the largest studies on the sustainability implications of social protection, funded by the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at The University of Sheffield. (2020-08-10)

Grow faster, die sooner
Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show. The results could help increase the effectiveness of antibiotics. (2020-08-06)

Gut feelings can be good for us
New research has found that paying greater attention to internal bodily sensations can increase our appreciation of our own bodies. (2020-07-30)

Buckwheat enhances the production of a protein that supports the longevity
A healthy low-calorie diet that contains plant products can help us improve the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein production that is known to increase life expectancy. A team of scientists from Krasnoyarsk conducted an experiment to see how buckwheat affected the health of rats. (2020-07-22)

Free trade can prevent hunger caused by climate change
An international team of researchers investigated the effects of trade on hunger in the world as a result of climate change. The conclusion is clear: international trade can compensate for regional food shortages and reduce hunger, particularly when protectionist measures and other barriers to trade are eliminated. (2020-07-20)

Mismatched caregiver-infant interactions during feeding could boost babies' risk of later obesity
A new integrative review examined evidence related to infants' self-regulation of behavior and emotion, and how that relates to interactions when they are fed by their caregivers, including how those interactions may derail infants' ability to regulate their intake of food. The review found that infants who are fed in the absence of hunger or beyond fullness may develop skewed perceptions of hunger and fullness, which could increase their risk of obesity and related health problems later in life. (2020-07-14)

Streamlining acute malnutrition treatment brings same recovery in children at lower cost
A new streamlined approach to treating acute malnutrition is as effective as standard treatment but will free up funds to reach more children with life-saving care, according to new research published in PLOS Medicine. (2020-07-09)

Targeted taxes and school lunch policies benefit low-income populations
Targeted taxes on sweetened beverages and policies that strengthen nutritional standards for meals and beverages at schools may be effective tools for decreasing the purchase of sweetened drinks and reducing obesity among children living in poverty, according to two studies led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2020-07-07)

Are you a hugger? It might be hereditary
Affection is partly genetic for women but not for men, finds a new study led by the University of Arizona. Those predisposed to being more affectionate may be struggling with 'skin hunger' amid COVID-19 physical distancing. (2020-06-23)

One in four UK adults at risk of hunger and potential malnutrition following lockdown
One in four adults in the UK are experiencing food insecurity, which is likely to have left them susceptible to hunger and potential malnutrition, during the COVID-19 pandemic. That is the main finding of a survey published today. (2020-06-20)

As food insecurity continues to plague New Yorkers, impact on children is worrisome
One in four households with children have reported a child experiencing hunger as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis, according to the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey. Many New Yorkers continued to report difficulties in getting the food they needed, but of particular concern is the impact on households with children under the age of 18. (2020-06-15)

'Building wealth and health network' reduces food insecurity without providing food
As the coronavirus pandemic forces so many to reckon with growing food insecurity and increased health challenges, the Building Wealth and Health Network program of Drexel University's Center for Hunger-Free Communities is reducing food insecurity and improving mental health - without distributing any food or medicine. (2020-06-10)

Reducing severe breathlessness and psychological trauma in COVID-19 ARDS survivors
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines ventilation and medication strategies that can help avoid psychological trauma for severe COVID-19 survivors treated for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with mechanical ventilation. (2020-06-05)

A deep look into the gut's hormones
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University generated an in-depth description of the human hormone-producing cells of the gut. These cells are difficult to study, as they are very rare and unique to different species of animals. The researchers developed tools to study human hormone-producing cells in mini-guts grown in the lab, called organoids. Their findings offer potential new avenues for the treatment of diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. (2020-05-13)

Otters juggle stones when hungry, research shows
Hunger is likely to be the main driver of stone juggling in otters, new research has shown. (2020-05-05)

'We urgently need a renewed public debate about new breeding technologies'
Plant breeding has considerably increased agricultural yields in recent decades and made a major contribution to combating global hunger and poverty. At the same time, however, the intensification of farming has had negative environmental effects. A recent study by the University of Göttingen shows that new plant breeding technologies - such as genetic engineering and gene editing - can help increase food production whilst being more environmentally friendly. Results were published in Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy. (2020-04-27)

Rats give more generously in response to the smell of hunger
How do animals that help their brethren manage to prioritize those most in need? A study publishing March 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Karin Schneeberger and colleagues of the universities of Bern in Switzerland and Potsdam in Germany, shows that rats can use odor cues alone to determine how urgently to provide food assistance to other rats in need. (2020-03-24)

Cellular stress makes obese mothers have obese babies
Maternal obesity increases the risk for obesity and metabolic perturbations in their offspring, but what are the mechanisms? In a new study published March 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Sebastien Bouret of the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in Lille, France, and colleagues show that a key step in the process is the triggering of stress in a complex membrane system within all cells called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). (2020-03-13)

How brain biology promotes starvation in patients with anorexia nervosa
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in brain circuitry that contribute to starvation and weight loss in people with anorexia nervosa. (2020-03-12)

The origin of satiety: Brain cells that change shape after a meal
You just finished a good meal and are feeling full? Researchers from the CNRS, Inrae, University of Burgundy, Université de Paris, Inserm, and University of Luxembourg have just revealed the mechanisms in our brains that lead to this state. They involve a series of reactions triggered by a rise in blood glucose levels. This study, which was conducted on mice, is published in Cell Reports on March 3, 2020. (2020-03-03)

Mapping childhood malnutrition
The scope of childhood malnutrition has decreased since 2000, although millions of children under five years of age are still undernourished and, as a result, have stunted growth. An international team of researchers analyzed the scope of global childhood malnutrition in 2000 and 2017, and estimated the probability of achieving the World Health Organization Global Nutrition Targets by 2025. (2020-03-02)

Overweight from cosmetics
Parabens are used as preservatives in cosmetics. If pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens that remain on the skin for protracted periods, this may have consequences for their child's subsequent weight development. This is demonstrated in a study published in the journal Nature Communications by researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in collaboration with colleagues from Leipzig University, Charité University Hospital in Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH). (2020-02-12)

Making sense of the self
Interoception is the awareness of our physiological states. But precisely how the brain calculates and reacts to this information remains unclear. In a paper published in the journal Neuron, neuroscientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) demonstrate how the insular cortex orchestrates the process. The work represents the first steps toward understanding the neural basis of interoception, which could allow researchers to address key questions in eating disorders, obesity, drug addiction, and a host of other diseases. (2020-01-16)

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