Current Hydraulic Fracturing News and Events | Page 2

Current Hydraulic Fracturing News and Events, Hydraulic Fracturing News Articles.
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Crystal coatings could help solve mystery of fracture patterns
A research group led by The University of Texas at Austin is challenging the current scientific paradigm by arguing that mechanics alone is not enough. To make progress on fracture research, scientists need to start considering the role of chemistry. (2019-11-13)

Severity of earthquake impact may change with the seasons, study shows
The devastating impact caused by earthquakes on the local communities and environment could differ in severity depending on the season a pioneering new study on two historic earthquakes in Kazakhstan has suggested. (2019-11-12)

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The CSU team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, showed that these crops had weakened immune systems. (2019-10-31)

Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level
On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. The collapse shocks scientists and unleashes the glacier behind the ice shelf, driving up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and the ensuing threat to sea level into cool, mathematical perspective. (2019-10-25)

Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on the east Antarctic ice sheet
The number of meltwater lakes on the surface of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is more significant than previously thought, according to new research. (2019-09-26)

Faster than ever -- neutron tomography detects water uptake by roots
The high-speed neutron tomography developed at HZB generates a complete 3D image every 1.5 seconds and is thus seven times faster than before. The method facilitates a better understanding of water and nutrient uptake of crop plants. The measurements were performed at the neutron source of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) in Grenoble, France. The method can also be applied to investigate transport processes in various porous material systems. (2019-09-25)

Climate change affects floods in Europe
For a long time, scientists argued whether or not climate change is affecting floods. No clear trends seemed to be evident. Now, in a major international study, data from numerous measurement stations all across Europe have been evaluated. The data clearly shows that climate change is indeed influencing the magnitude of flood events. However, climate change has different consequences in different regions. (2019-08-28)

'Surrey swarm' earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, says study
Imperial College London research has found no evidence that oil extraction caused recent earthquakes known as the 'Surrey swarm' in Surrey and Sussex. (2019-08-27)

Innovative valve train saves 20% fuel
Empa has developed an innovative, electrohydraulically actuated valve train for internal combustion engines, that enables completely free adjustment of stroke and timing, while at the same time being robust and cost effective. This valve train was mounted on a serial production engine and has been running successfully for several months. The new technology saves up to 20% fuel. (2019-08-19)

Fracking has less impact on groundwater than traditional oil and gas production
The amount of water injected for conventional oil and gas production exceeds that from high-volume hydraulic fracturing and other unconventional oil and gas production by more than a factor of 10, according to a new report. Conventional methods of oil and gas production have been used since the late 1800s. An assessment of the environmental impacts of the petroleum industry should examine the conventional production methods, as well as fracking. (2019-08-15)

New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane
As methane concentrations increase in the Earth's atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. (2019-08-14)

New solution to elderly falls: drones, smartphones and sensors
Drones, smartphones and sensors could provide a lifeline to the world's growing elderly population at risk of falls, helping to cut global hospital costs. (2019-08-12)

Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology
While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. In new experiments, CSU engineers offer fundamental insight into why certain membrane designs work better than others. (2019-08-07)

Very little public support for relaxing rules and regulations around fracking
A major new public attitudes survey on fracking reveals very little public support for relaxing the rules and regulations around fracking -- a key demand of major shale gas extraction companies. (2019-08-01)

Fracking likely to result in high emissions
Natural gas releases fewer greenhouse gases than other fossil fuels. That's why it is often seen as a bridge technology to a low-carbon future. A study by the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) has estimated emissions from shale gas production through fracking in Germany and the UK. It shows that CO2-eq. emissions would exceed the estimated current emissions from conventional gas production in Germany. The potential risks make strict adherence to environmental standards vital. (2019-07-25)

Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy
A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy. Results appear in the journal Environmental Research. (2019-07-24)

Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge. (2019-07-18)

Artificial snowfall could save the west antarctic ice sheet, but with high costs and risks
By pumping ocean water onto coastal regions surrounding parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet and converting it to snow, it may be possible to prevent the ice sheet from sliding into the ocean and melting, according to a new modeling study. The authors caution that while the findings offer a potentially feasible and less dangerous solution compared to other proposed. (2019-07-17)

Artificial 'muscles' achieve powerful pulling force
As a cucumber plant grows, it sprouts tightly coiled tendrils that seek out supports in order to pull the plant upward. This ensures the plant receives as much sunlight exposure as possible. Now, researchers at MIT have found a way to imitate this coiling-and-pulling mechanism to produce contracting fibers that could be used as artificial muscles for robots, prosthetic limbs, or other mechanical and biomedical applications. (2019-07-11)

Geophysical observations reveal the water distribution and effect in Earth's mantle
Professor Eiji Ohtani from Tohoku University, Japan, summarized the content, distribution and effect of water in the Earth's mantle, published in National Science Review. (2019-07-10)

Equations help predict the behavior of water in rivers
University of Cordoba researchers developed a mathematical model that allows for anticipating the failure of dikes that hold in overflowing river water. (2019-07-02)

When kinetics and thermodynamics should play together
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering suggests that without considering certain factors, researchers may overestimate how fast calcium carbonate forms in saline environments. (2019-07-01)

'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks
Researchers at Cornell University have created a system of circulating liquid -- 'robot blood' -- within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks. (2019-06-20)

UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)

Swapping water for CO2 could make fracking greener and more effective
Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and China University of Petroleum (Beijing) have demonstrated that CO2 may make a better hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluid than water. Their research, published May 30 in the journal Joule, could help pave the way for a more eco-friendly form of fracking that would double as a mechanism for storing captured atmospheric CO2. (2019-05-30)

Societal values and perceptions shape energy production and use as much as new technology
Societal values and perceptions have shaped the energy landscape as much as the technologies that drive its production and consumption, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (2019-05-28)

The new quadruped robot HyQReal tested by pulling 3 tons airplane
Researchers at IIT presented at ICRA 2019 the new version of the hydraulic quadruped robot HyQ: HyQReal. The robot is 1.33 meters long and 90 cm tall, and its weight is 130 kg considering hydraulics and batteries onboard. The new features have been tested in Genova Airport, in Genoa (Italy), with the support of Piaggio Aerospace, demonstrating the power of HyQReal by pulling a small passenger airplane (Piaggio P180 Avanti), 3,300 kg weight. (2019-05-23)

Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada
Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada. (2019-05-23)

Solving a scientific mystery and finding a solution for industry
In solving a scientific mystery, researchers from the University of Houston and the nation's national laboratories also discovered a new avenue for clearing toxins from water, including wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. (2019-05-21)

Improved risk management for geothermal systems
In a new study now published in Science Advances an international team of scientists reports on a successful attempt to control induced seismicity during the deepest-ever hydraulic stimulation of a geothermal well in Helsinki, Finland. In a collaborative effort, researchers from commercial companies, academic institutions and universities, designed and successfully applied a safe stimulation strategy preventing the occurrence of a project-stopping induced earthquake with a magnitude larger than 2. (2019-05-01)

Federal research significant in environmental rule-making
Federally-sponsored science plays a more significant role in bringing together stakeholders and facilitating environmental governance debates than all other types of research, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-04-29)

Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US
Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting. (2019-04-26)

PA residents shoulder health impacts of state's oil and gas waste
More than 80 percent of all waste from Pennsylvania's oil and gas drilling operations stays inside the state, according to a new study that tracks the disposal locations of liquid and solid waste from these operations across 26 years. Numerous human health hazards have been associated with waste from oil and gas extraction, including potential exposure to compounds known to cause cancer. (2019-04-22)

A 'virtual' view with a little bit of math
Giovanna Guidoboni, Marjorie Skubic and a team at the University of Missouri are currently working to develop a standardized model to interpret the results of a ballistocardiogram that could provide an additional approach for early detection of various cardiovascular diseases. (2019-04-17)

Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations
Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study published in Seismological Research Letters. (2019-04-04)

The secret behind maximum plant height: water!
Ecologists from the South China Botanical Garden (SCBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences concluded that such coordination plays an important role in determining global sorting of plant species, and can be useful in predicting future species distribution under climate change scenarios. (2019-03-05)

Imaging technique lets ordinary cameras capture high-speed images of crack formation
Because cracks propagate quickly, studying the fracturing process currently requires expensive high-speed cameras. A new imaging method known as the virtual frame technique allows ordinary digital cameras to capture millions of frames per second for several seconds, requiring only a short and intense pulse of light. At the 2019 APS March Meeting, researchers will describe how the virtual frame technique would allow direct imaging of fracturing and other material surface processes. (2019-03-04)

Researchers engineer a tougher fiber
Researchers have developed a fiber that combines the elasticity of rubber with the strength of a metal, resulting in a tougher material that could be incorporated into soft robotics, packaging materials or next-generation textiles. (2019-02-22)

How plants learned to save water
Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team at the University of W├╝rzburg is investigating how plants control their water balance. (2019-02-21)

Observing hydrogen's effects in metal
Microscopy technique could help researchers design safer reactor vessels or hydrogen storage tanks. (2019-02-05)

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