Current Hydraulic Fracturing News and Events | Page 3

Current Hydraulic Fracturing News and Events, Hydraulic Fracturing News Articles.
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The first tendril-like soft robot able to climb
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia obtained the first soft robot mimicking plant tendrils: it is able to curl and climb, using the same physical principles determining water transport in plants. The research team is led by Barbara Mazzolai and results have been published in Nature Communications. In the future this tendril-like soft robot could inspire the development of wearable devices, such as soft braces, able to actively morph their shape. (2019-01-24)

Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer
Kanazawa University researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between their dislocations and may improve the safety of structures such as buildings and bridges in earthquakes. (2019-01-17)

Trees change inside as drought persists
James Cook University scientists in Australia have found that trees change their anatomy in response to prolonged drought. (2019-01-08)

'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
The mathematical and computational model is the first to predict branching while being consistent with the amount of gas that is known to be released from the shale. (2019-01-07)

USGS identifies largest continuous oil and gas resource potential ever
USGS announces an assessment of continuous oil and gas in Texas and New Mexico's Delaware Basin, the largest USGS has ever conducted, with an estimate of 46.3 billion barrels of oil and 281 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. (2018-12-06)

US groundwater in peril: Potable supply less than thought
Many rural areas in parts of the US rely exclusively on groundwater for both agricultural and domestic use. Drilling deeper wells may not be a good long-term solution to compensate for increasing demands on groundwater, because there is potential for contamination of deep fresh and brackish water in areas where the oil and gas industry injects wastewaters into or in close proximity to aquifers. The study was published Nov. 14 in Environmental Research Letters. (2018-11-28)

Chinese scientists unlock structural secrets of whale baleen
Chinese scientists working with other researchers have for the first time uncovered the underlying mechanisms of the hierarchical structure of baleen, with an eye toward developing advanced engineered materials. (2018-11-21)

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions
A collaboration between Nagoya University and TU Braunschweig finds evidence that when projectiles hit soft clumps of dust or hard clumps of loose glass beads, the scaling laws for energy dissipation and energy transfer are the same in each case. This helps us understand how granular clumps stick together, and how planets are formed. (2018-11-16)

Where water goes after fracking is tied to earthquake risk
In addition to producing oil and gas, the energy industry produces a lot of water, about 10 barrels of water per barrel of oil on average. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that where the produced water is stored underground influences the risk of induced earthquakes. (2018-11-01)

Location of wastewater disposal drives induced seismicity at US oil sites
The depth of the rock layer that serves as the disposal site for wastewater produced during unconventional oil extraction plays a significant role in whether that disposal triggers earthquakes in the US, according to a new study that takes a broad look at the issue. (2018-10-31)

Memory-steel -- A new material for the strengthening of buildings
A new building material developed at Empa is about to be launched on the market: 'memory-steel' can not only be used to reinforce new, but also existing concrete structures. When the material is heated (one-time), prestressing occurs automatically. The Empa spin-off re-fer AG is now presenting the material with shape memory in a series of lectures. (2018-10-23)

How to mass produce cell-sized robots
MIT researchers have discovered a way to mass produce tiny, cell-sized robots that could be used for industrial or biomedical monitoring. (2018-10-23)

Russian scientists created a new method for diagnosing drilling rigs for oil production
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) came closer to solving one of the key issues of offshore oil production, namely they developed a special method of nondestructive testing of drilling rig elements in the oil wells, which will ensure the efficient oil production and reduce the time and cost of equipment repair. (2018-10-11)

No more Iron Man: submarines now have soft, robotic arms
The human arm can perform a wide range of extremely delicate and coordinated movements. The robotic 'arms' on underwater research submarines, however, lack the finesse to reach and interact with soft-bodied sea creatures. A new system from the Wyss Institute and collaborators lets biologists intuitively control a modular, highly flexible soft robotic arm by wearing a glove equipped with wireless soft sensors. This system also could one day enable the creation of submarine-based research labs. (2018-10-03)

Diverse forests are stronger against drought
In a paper published in Nature, researchers including University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous work that looked at individual tree species' resilience based on hydraulic traits, lead to new research directions on forest resilience and inform forest managers working to rebuild forests after logging or wildfire. (2018-09-19)

How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste
Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas. (2018-09-18)

Injection wells can induce earthquakes miles away from the well
A study of earthquakes induced by injecting fluids deep underground has revealed surprising patterns, suggesting that current recommendations for hydraulic fracturing, wastewater disposal, and geothermal wells may need to be revised. (2018-08-30)

Water use for fracking has risen by up to 770 percent since 2011
The amount of water used per well for fracking surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major US shale gas- and oil-producing regions, a Duke University study finds. The volume of flowback and produced water that new wells generated during their first year of operation also increased by up to 1,440 percent. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking's water footprint could grow by up to 50-fold by the year 2030. (2018-08-15)

A steady increase in the water footprint at US fracking sites
Water use for hydraulic fracturing (commonly referred to as 'fracking') in the US has been increasing at individual facilities in recent years, even as unconventional oil and gas production has more broadly declined, a new study reports. The findings emphasize the importance of water management at fracking operations, particularly if the prices of oil and natural (2018-08-15)

Household phenomenon observed by Leonardo da Vinci finally explained by Cambridge research
Since the 1820s scientists have believed that hydraulic jumps occur partly as a result of the gravitational pull. But a paper published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics has disproved this longstanding theory. (2018-08-07)

Mathematical analysis explains transpiration-driven sap flow in coniferous trees
The exact science of tree sap transport has puzzled plant physiologists for many years. Sap's migration throughout tree trunks and branches is linked heavily to transpiration, the movement and subsequent evaporation of moisture from plants. In an article publishing this week in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics, Bebart M. Janbek and John M. Stockie present a multidimensional porous medium model that measures sap flow within a tree stem. (2018-07-26)

Made-to-measure silicon building blocks
Silicones are synthetic materials used in a broad range of applications. Thanks to the stability of the silicon-oxygen bond, they are resistant to chemicals and environmental influences and also harmless from a physiological point of view. As a result, silicones contribute to making everyday life easier in almost all areas. In the Journal of the American Chemical Society, chemists at Goethe University Frankfurt have now described a new way to produce long-awaited silicon building blocks in a simple and efficient way. (2018-07-24)

When oil and water mix
Hydraulic fracturing of organic-rich shales has become a major industry. The commonly used term for this extraction of hydrocarbons -- fracking -- is especially intriguing. Not only does it convey the process of breaking apart rocks, but the dividing of public opinion. Fracking is simultaneously hyped as a boon to the economy and a disaster to the environment. (2018-07-03)

Methane-producing microbial communities found in fracking wells
New research has uncovered the genetic details of microbes found in fracking wells. Not only do a wide array of bacteria and viruses thrive in these crevices created by hydraulic fracturing - they also have the power to produce methane, according to a study led by scientists at The Ohio State University and published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2018-06-25)

USGS estimates 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford Group
The Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate consists of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in continuous accumulations. (2018-06-22)

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development
Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a Duke-led study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred through PPARy-dependent and independent mechanisms. More research is needed to assess potential health impacts outside the laboratory. (2018-06-21)

Water users associations approve remote control watering systems
Researchers at the University of Cordoba assess the success or failure of installing remote control systems and data measuring in water users associations. (2018-06-08)

Study finds no evidence of natural gas from fracking in Ohio drinking water
A study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling. Geologists with the University of Cincinnati examined drinking water in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells. The time-series study was the first of its kind in Ohio. (2018-05-18)

The superhero semiconductor: Inflexible during the day, but bendy at night
Scientists have discovered that a type of inorganic semiconductor, which doesn't deform well under light, can bend a whopping 45 percent from its original form when in the dark. (2018-05-17)

Majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficient
Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center. In a national survey of 2,541 US adults, 69 percent of Americans say the federal government isn't doing enough to protect water quality of lakes, rivers and streams and 64 percent say the same about air quality. Two-thirds (67 percent) say the government is doing too little to reduce the effects of climate change. (2018-05-14)

Even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatment
Research has shed new light how an increasingly common consumer product component -- silver nanoparticles -- can potentially interfere with the treatment of wastewater. (2018-05-14)

Scientists train spider to jump on demand to discover secrets of animal movement
Scientists have unlocked the secrets of how some predatory spiders catch their prey whilst hunting by successfully training one to jump different distances and heights for the first time. (2018-05-08)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

Proximity to fracking sites affects public support of them, study finds
People who live closer to fracking sites are more familiar with and more supportive of hydraulic fracturing, while those who live in proximity to areas of higher oil and gas well density are more familiar with but not necessarily more supportive of the practice. (2018-04-30)

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on Mars
As Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus. (2018-04-19)

New valve technology promises cheaper, greener engines
Technology developed at the University of Waterloo reliably and affordably increases the efficiency of internal combustion engines by more than 10 per cent. (2018-03-21)

Radar images show large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates
Radar satellite images show a large swath of Texas oil patch is heaving and sinking at alarming rates, according to a geophysical team from Southern Methodist University. Analysis of the images with oil activity data from the Texas Railroad Commission suggests decades of oil activity have destabilized localities of the 4,000-square-mile area, which is populated by small towns, roadways and a vast network of oil and gas pipelines and storage tanks. (2018-03-21)

Low-tech, affordable solutions to improve water quality
Clever, fundamental engineering could go a long way toward preventing waterborne illness and exposure to carcinogenic substances in water. (2018-03-20)

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gas
Nutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana. (2018-03-13)

Increasing tree mortality in a warming world
A mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago. (2018-03-09)

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