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Current Hydrogel News and Events, Hydrogel News Articles.
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Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

To make mini-organs grow faster, give them a squeeze
To make organoids grow faster, give them a squeeze, suggests an MIT study, which finds compressing cells, and crowding their contents, can coax them to grow and divide. The results may lead to faster way to grow artificial organs. (2020-10-13)

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a ''mechanical'' mode of bacterial infection. (2020-10-08)

A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves -- tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body -- often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage. They report their results in ACS Nano. (2020-10-07)

New discovery helps researchers rethink organoid cultures
Organoids are stem cell-based tissue surrogates that can mimic the structure and function of organs, and they have become a key component of numerous types of medical research in recent years. But researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have uncovered problems with the conventional method for growing organoids for common experiments that may cause misleading results. (2020-09-29)

Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice. (2020-09-16)

Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations. (2020-09-16)

Tiny biological package gets drug right to the 'heart' of transplant rejection
For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, 'Good things come in small packages,' may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a tiny three-dimensional, protein gel cocoon known as a hydrogel. (2020-09-03)

Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique - which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet - can be used to coax bone marrow stem cells into specialized cells. (2020-09-03)

Novel alkaline hydrogel advances skin wound care
Effective wound care requires the maintenance of optimal conditions for skin and tissue regeneration. Hydrogels provide many of these conditions, but not an alkaline environment. Now, in a breakthrough study, scientists at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new method that requires no specialized equipment and can be performed at room temperature to produce an alkaline hydrogel in five minutes, allowing its easy implementation in any medical practice for superior wound healing. (2020-08-26)

Less is more: A soft, self-actuated pump to simplify mechatronic devices
As electromechanical devices become increasingly small and complex, the high number of required components becomes a limiting factor. Now, scientists at Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan, have tapped into the potential of hydrogels driven by oscillating chemical reactions to create the first self-actuated, single-component pump. This device could act as a practical power source for microfluidic systems and highlights the potential of soft bio-inspired machinery in mechatronic devices. (2020-08-25)

Superfast o-phthalaldehyde/N-nucleophile cross-linking strategy for biomedical hydrogels
Recently, Prof. Xuesi Chen and colleagues at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, proposed a new crosslinking strategy based on the condensation reaction between o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and N-nucleophiles for hydrogel formation. (2020-08-20)

A smart eye mask that tracks muscle movements to tell what 'caught your eye'
Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. The eyewear -- known as Chesma and presented August 20 in the journal Matter--provides accurate measurements in an everyday environment without compromising users' comfort. (2020-08-20)

UMass Amherst scientists invent new sensing eye mask
From the team that invented physiology-sensing pajamas at UMass Amherst, now comes a new, lightweight eye mask that can unobtrusively capture pulse, eye movement and sleep signals, for example, when worn in an everyday environment. Senior authors, materials chemist Trisha L. Andrew and computer scientist Deepak Ganesan, say that ''being able to track pulse and eye movement in a single wearable device will enable a host of sleep and psycho-social studies. (2020-08-20)

Heart attack damage reduced by shielded stem cells
Bioengineers and surgeons from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in rodents that a four-week shielded stem cell treatment can reduce damage caused by a heart attack. (2020-08-18)

Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
A group led by UC Riverside bioengineering professor Victor G. J. Rodgers and UC Riverside School of Medicine professor Devin Binder has created an osmotic therapy device that gently removes fluid from the spinal cord to reduce swelling in injured rats with good results. The device can eventually be scaled up for testing in humans. (2020-08-12)

Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Purdue University researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samples of bacteria. (2020-08-12)

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)

Computational gene study suggests new pathway for COVID-19 inflammatory response
A team led by Dan Jacobson of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used the Summit supercomputer at ORNL to analyze genes from cells in the lung fluid of nine COVID-19 patients compared with 40 control patients. (2020-07-28)

Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability
Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain. They report their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2020-07-27)

How smart, ultrathin nanosheets go fishing for proteins
An interdisciplinary team from Frankfurt and Jena has developed a kind of bait with which to fish protein complexes out of mixtures. (2020-07-20)

Gel that breaks down, puts itself back together could improve delivery of oral drugs
An emerging hydrogel material with the capacity to degrade and spontaneously reform in the gastrointestinal tract could help researchers develop more effective methods for oral drug delivery. In research published in Soft Matter, Lehigh University rheologists mimic pH environment of GI tract to shed light on pharmaceutical potential of covalent adaptable hydrogels (CAHs). (2020-07-16)

New bioink for cell bioprinting in 3D
A research group led by Daniel Aili, associate professor at Linköping University, has developed a bioink to print tissue-mimicking material in 3D printers. The scientists have developed a method and a material that allow cells to survive and thrive. (2020-07-13)

From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, Duke University researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to match the strength and durability of the real thing. (2020-06-26)

Research brief: New discovery allows 3D printing of sensors directly on expanding organs
In groundbreaking new research, mechanical engineers and computer scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a 3D printing technique that uses motion capture technology, similar to that used in Hollywood movies, to print electronic sensors directly on organs that are expanding and contracting. The new 3D printing technique could have future applications in diagnosing and monitoring the lungs of patients with COVID-19. (2020-06-17)

Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. They showed that pancreatic cells encapsulated in 1.0-mm-thick hydrogel fibers normalized blood glucose levels in diabetic mice while being protected from foreign body reactions. These findings help facilitate cell-based therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. (2020-06-15)

Lightning in a (nano)bottle: new supercapacitor opens door to better wearable electronics
Researchers from Skoltech, Aalto University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a high-performance, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and stretchable supercapacitor that can potentially be used in wearable electronics (2020-06-11)

Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology. (2020-06-09)

Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection
Glyphosate is a very widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, which is why a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial. Researchers at Leipzig University and Technische Universität Dresden have spent more than a year working on a solution in a collaborative project with three companies from Saxony. (2020-06-08)

Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days
A joint research team from POSTECH and KAIST develops self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors. Applicable to various fields including smart windows, health care and safety management. (2020-05-28)

Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)

Direct control of dendritic cells for tracking and immune modulation
Dendritic cells patrol the body for invaders and activate T cells and natural killer cells to attack them, making them crucial players in keeping cancer and other diseases at bay. A new biomaterial-based technique now allows dendritic cells to be tagged, tracked, and controlled within the body for the first time. When deployed in mice, this system both treated and prevented lung cancer tumors, and shows promise for other immune conditions as well. (2020-05-18)

Lighting the path for cells
ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms -- and in the future may even play a part in novel therapies. (2020-05-12)

A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create ''smart skins'' for printed parts. The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-04-28)

A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed a hydrogel that can both cool down electronics, such as cell phone batteries, and convert their waste heat into electricity. (2020-04-22)

Penn Engineering's new scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. Their 'metal-air scavenger' gets the best of both worlds. (2020-04-21)

Impulse for research on fungi
For the first time, the cells of fungi can also be analysed using a relatively simple microscopic method. Researchers from Würzburg and Cordoba present the innovation in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology. (2020-04-08)

Harnessing the power of electricity-producing bacteria for programmable 'biohybrids'
Someday, microbial cyborgs -- bacteria combined with electronic devices -- could be useful in fuel cells, biosensors and bioreactors. But first, scientists need to develop materials that not only nurture the microbes, but also efficiently and controllably harvest the electricity or other resources they make. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed one such material that enabled them to create a programmable 'biohybrid' system that conducts electrons from electricity-producing (exoelectrogenic) bacteria. (2020-04-08)

Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue. Such flexible electronics could be softer alternatives to existing metal-based electrodes designed to monitor brain activity, and may also be useful in brain implants that stimulate neural regions to ease symptoms of epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and severe depression. (2020-03-30)

(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis. In a new study, scientists from Tokyo University of Science, led by Prof Hidenori Otsuka, have developed a novel biocompatible hydrogel that acts as a structural scaffold for the growth of cartilage-producing cells, showcasing a promising new tool for tissue regeneration. (2020-03-30)

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