Current Hydrogen News and Events

Current Hydrogen News and Events, Hydrogen News Articles.
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Biopolymer-coated nanocatalyst can help realize a hydrogen fuel-driven future
While popular as an eco-friendly fuel, hydrogen is difficult to produce efficiently in an eco-friendly manner (through sunlight-induced decomposition of water) due to stability issues of catalysts (chemical reaction facilitators). In a new study, scientists demonstrate water splitting under sunlight using polydopamine-coated zinc sulfide nanorods as a catalyst. In their paper, they report a remarkably enhanced hydrogen production rate and look into the causes, paving the way for a hydrogen-based future. (2021-02-23)

Researchers discover potential new therapeutic targets on SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein
The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted considerable investigation into how the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to a human cell during the infection process, as this knowledge is useful in designing vaccines and therapeutics. Now, a team of scientists has discovered additional locations on the Spike protein that may not only help to explain how certain mutations make emerging variants more infectious but also could be used as additional targets for therapeutic intervention. (2021-02-22)

Antibiotic tolerance study paves way for new treatments
The study in mice, 'A Multifaceted Cellular Damage Repair and Prevention Pathway Promotes High Level Tolerance to Beta-lactam Antibiotics,' published Feb. 3 in the journal EMBO Reports, reveals how tolerance occurs, thanks to a system that mitigates iron toxicity in bacteria that have been exposed to penicillin. (2021-02-22)

HKUST decodes a deep-sea vent-endemic snail hologenome
A research team led by Prof. QIAN Peiyuan, Head and Chair Professor from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)'s Department of Ocean Science and David von Hansemann Professor of Science, has discovered that Gigantopelta snail houses both sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and methane-oxidizing bacteria inside its esophageal gland cells (part of digestive system) as endosymbionts, disclosing a novel dual symbiosis system and the molecular adaptation to the extreme environment, gaining a new understanding of the origin of life on Earth. (2021-02-19)

New crystalline ice form
Three years ago, chemists at the University of Innsbruck found evidence for the existence of a new variety of ice. Until then, 18 types of crystalline ice were known. The team led by Thomas Loerting now reports in Nature Communications on the elucidation of the crystal structure of ice XIX using neutron diffraction. (2021-02-18)

Investigating the wave properties of matter with vibrating molecules
The working group led by Prof. Stephan Schiller, Ph.D. from Heinrich Heine University D├╝sseldorf (HHU) has used a novel, high-precision laser spectroscopic experiment to measure the internal vibration of the simplest molecule. This allowed the researchers to investigate the wave character of the motion of atomic nuclei with unprecedented accuracy. They present their findings in the current edition of Nature Physics. (2021-02-18)

Fueling the future: Novel two-polymer membrane boosts hydrogen fuel cell performance
Fuel cells are an attractive sustainable energy source due to their eco-friendly by-product, water. However, existing fuel cells are either expensive or low performance. Now, scientists from Korea have designed a robust and highly conductive fuel cell ion-exchange membrane using two readily available polymer materials and a unique technique, opening doors to fuel cells that are both cheap and high performing, bringing us closer to realizing a hydrogen economy. (2021-02-17)

Hydrogen peroxide, universal oxidizing agent, high-efficiency production by simple process
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that a joint research team developed a platinum-gold alloy catalyst for hydrogen peroxide production based on a computer simulation. Hydrogen peroxide selectivity can be increased to 95% by using this catalyst, compared with only 30-40% for a palladium catalyst, which indicates that mostly hydrogen peroxide on the developed Pt-Au catalyst can be produced with a small amount of water. (2021-02-16)

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials
A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies. (2021-02-16)

Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division
Many biological processes are subject to rhythmic changes. Well-known examples of this are the so-called circadian rhythm, an ''internal clock'' with a period of around 24 hours, or the shorter ultradian rhythm. Cell division is often linked to these rhythms. Biologists from Saarbr├╝cken and Kaiserslautern have now found out that these rhythms and their coupling with cell division is closely related to hydrogen peroxide. The study was published in the renowned journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-02-16)

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses
POSTECH professor Junsuk Rho's research team develops a transparent silicon without visible light loss by controlling the silicon atomic structure. (2021-02-14)

Producing more sustainable hydrogen with composite polymer dots
Hydrogen for energy use can be extracted in an environmentally friendly way from water and sunlight, using photocatalytic composite polymer nanoparticles developed by researchers at Uppsala University. In laboratory tests, these 'polymer dots' showed promising performance and stability alike. The study has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2021-02-12)

Study reveals platinum's role in clean fuel conversion
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Stony Brook University (SBU), and other collaborating institutions have uncovered dynamic, atomic-level details of how an important platinum-based catalyst works in the water gas shift reaction. The experiments provide definitive evidence that only certain platinum atoms play an important role in the chemical conversion, and could therefore guide the design of catalysts that use less of this precious metal. (2021-02-10)

'Defective' carbon simplifies hydrogen peroxide production
Rice University scientists introduce a new catalyst to reduce oxygen to widely used hydrogen peroxide. The process sidesteps complex and expensive processes that generate toxic organic byproducts and large amounts of wastewater. (2021-02-09)

Insights into lithium metal battery failure open doors to doubling battery life
Researchers led by Prof. CUI Guanglei from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have identified what causes lithium metal batteries (LMBs) to ''self-destruct'' and proposed a way to prevent it. (2021-02-08)

New synthetic route for biofuel production
A German-Chinese research team has found a new synthetic route to produce biofuel from biomass. The chemists converted the substance 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) produced from biomass into 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), which could be suitable as a biofuel. Compared to previous methods, they achieved a higher yield and selectivity under milder reaction conditions. (2021-02-08)

The proton conduction mechanism in protic ionic liquids
Researchers from Niigata University, Japan along with their collaborators from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, Yamagata University, Japan and University of Regensburg, Germany have reported a marked shift in the hydrogen ion hopping mechanism as a function of acid/alkali index in protic ionic liquids. The study holds immense potential to revolutionize the development of protonic conductors for fuel cells. These promising results are now published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2021-02-04)

Hydrogen-producing enzyme protects itself against oxygen
Hydrogen-producing enzymes are beacons of hope in biohydrogen research. However, they are so vulnerable to oxygen in the air that it has not been possible to exploit their potential on a larger scale. The recently discovered [FeFe]-hydrogenase CbA5H from the bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii resists the oxygen attack. (2021-02-02)

Optimized LIBS technique improves analysis of nuclear reactor materials
In a new study, investigators report an optimized approach to using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analyzing hydrogen isotopes. Their new findings could enable improved rapid identification and measurement of hydrogen and other light isotopes that are important in nuclear reactor materials and other applications. (2021-02-01)

New catalyst moves seawater desalination, hydrogen production closer to commercialization
Seawater is abundant and cheap, making it a tempting resource to meet the world's growing need for clean drinking water and carbon-free energy. Now researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new catalyst that can be made quickly and inexpensively, bringing the technology closer to commercial reality. (2021-01-28)

Beckman Institute MRI expertise aids research on hemodialysis therapy patients
Beckman Institute researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used a nonstandard magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate patients' response to a strategy to aid those with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy. (2021-01-27)

First direct band gap measurements of wide-gap hydrogen using inelastic X-ray scattering
Utilizing a newly developed state-of-the-art synchrotron technique, a group of scientists led by Dr. Ho-kwang Mao, Director of HPSTAR, conducted the first-ever high-pressure study of the electronic band and gap information of solid hydrogen up to 90 GPa. (2021-01-26)

Solar hydrogen: Photoanodes made of alpha-SnWO4 promise high efficiencies
Photoanodes made of metal oxides are considered to be a viable solution for the production of hydrogen with sunlight. Alpha-SnWO4 has optimal electronic properties for photoelectrochemical water splitting with sunlight, but corrodes easily. Protective layers of nickel oxide prevent corrosion, but reduce the photovoltage and limit the efficiency. Now a team at HZB has investigated at BESSY II what happens at the interface between the photoanode and the protective layer. (2021-01-26)

Boosting the efficiency of carbon capture and conversion systems
Researchers at MIT have developed a method to boost the performance of carbon capture systems that use catalytic surfaces to enhance the rates of carbon-sequestering electrochemical reactions. (2021-01-25)

New eco-friendly way to make ammonia could be boon for agriculture, hydrogen economy
Ammonia has sustained humanity since the early 20th century, but its production leaves a huge carbon footprint. Now researchers have found a way to make it 100 per cent renewable. (2021-01-21)

Producing green hydrogen through the exposure of nanomaterials to sunlight
A research team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has joined forces with French researchers from the The Institute of Chemistry and Processes for Energy, Environment and Health (ICPEES), a CNRS-University of Strasbourg joint research lab, to pave the way towards the production of green hydrogen. (2021-01-21)

Boosted photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution: Reactant supply thru phosphonate groups
Water splitting research for solar hydrogen production has focused on physical processes inside the semiconductor, such as light absorption, charge separation, and chemical processes on the surface that are highly complex and rely on the development of new materials. The concept proposed in this study is design of the electrolyte-photocatalyst interface. The approach of immobilizing functional groups near the solid-liquid interface can be a broad-ranging methodology that is effective regardless of the materials used. (2021-01-20)

NIH scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient--taurine--that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics. (2021-01-15)

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light
Using state-of-the-art fabrication and imaging, researchers watched the consequences of adding sculpted light to a catalyst during a chemical transformation. This work could inform more efficient -- and potentially new -- forms of catalysis. (2021-01-15)

Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
Tsukuba University scientists show that the effectiveness of hydrogen-producing metal catalysts protected by graphene depends on the ability of protons to penetrate into the inner metallic surface. This work may lead to widely available hydrogen-powered cars. (2021-01-14)

Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
Emergent e-fuel technologies often employ the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction to convert atmospheric CO2 to CO. While efficient, this reaction requires high temperatures and complex gas separation for high performance. However, for the first time in the world, scientists from Japan have now demonstrated record-high CO2 conversion rates at relatively low temperatures in a modified chemical-looping version of RWGS using a novel copper-indium oxide. (2021-01-13)

Making hydrogen energy with the common nickel
POSTECH joint research team develops a nickel-based catalyst system doped with oxophilic transition metal elements. (2021-01-12)

Scientists have synthesized an unusual superconducting barium superhydride
A new exotic compound, BaH12, has been discovered by experiment and theory. Unusually, it is a molecular metal and demonstrates the superconducting transition around 20?K at 140?GPa (2021-01-12)

Rotten egg gas could guard against Alzheimer's disease
Typically characterized as poisonous, corrosive and smelling of rotten eggs, hydrogen sulfide's reputation may soon get a face-lift thanks to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. In experiments in mice, researchers have shown the foul-smelling gas may help protect aging brain cells against Alzheimer's disease. (2021-01-12)

Study shows tweaking one layer of atoms on a catalyst's surface can make it work better
When an LNO catalyst with a nickel-rich surface carries out a water-splitting reaction, its surface atoms rearrange from a cubic to a hexagonal pattern and its efficiency doubles. Deliberately engineering the surface to take advantage of this phenomenon offers a way to design better catalysts. (2021-01-11)

Liquid metal ink liberates form
POSTECH-Yonsei University joint research team develops liquid metal ink for 3D circuit lines. (2021-01-10)

Researchers take key step toward cleaner, more sustainable production of hydrogen
Efficiently mass-producing hydrogen from water is closer to becoming a reality thanks to Oregon State University College of Engineering researchers and collaborators at Cornell University and the Argonne National Laboratory. (2021-01-08)

Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
The University of Wyoming team created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries. (2021-01-06)

Turning the heat down: Catalyzing ammonia formation at lower temperatures with ruthenium
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report that the metal ruthenium, supported with lanthanide oxyhydrides, can efficiently catalyze the synthesis of ammonia at a much lower temperature than the traditional approach. In their new study, they highlight the advantages of the oxyhydride support and its potential in becoming a feasible catalyst for low-temperature ammonia synthesis in the future. (2020-12-23)

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