Current Hydrophobic News and Events

Current Hydrophobic News and Events, Hydrophobic News Articles.
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Self-assembly induced luminescence of Eu3+-complexes for bioimaging application
Yu Tang and Chun-Hua Yan from Lanzhou University successfully developed a nano-system with self-assembly induced luminescence (SAIL) through the design of the structure and assembly method of the Eu3+ complex. The assembled Eu3+-complex nanoparticles can be applied in biosensing and imaging by fluorescence intensity and lifetime assays. (2021-02-16)

Double delight: New synthetic transmembrane ion channel can be activated in two ways
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and University of Tokyo, Japan, have, for the first time, synthesized a novel artificial transmembrane ion channel--modelled on a naturally found transmembrane channel involved in neuron signaling--that responds to both chemical and electrical stimuli. Given its overall properties, this artificial channel opens doors to novel fundamental research into cellular transport and signaling, new possibilities in drug development, and the potential for new types of biosensors. (2021-02-01)

New method to assist fast-tracking of vaccines for pre-clinical tests
A new method to synthesize vaccines safely and quickly should see much faster pre-clinical testing to pursue strategies to combat novel pathogens, something the COVID pandemic has shown is necessary. (2021-01-18)

Innovative battery chemistry revolutionizes zinc-air battery
The zinc-air battery is an attractive energy storage technology of the future. Based on an innovative, non-alkaline, aqueous electrolyte, an international research team led by scientist Dr. Wei Sun of MEET Battery Research Center at the University of Muenster has developed a new battery chemistry for the zinc-air battery which overcomes the previous technical obstacles. (2021-01-04)

Researchers find why 'lab-made' proteins have unusually high temperature stability
Efforts to enhance the ability of proteins to resist breaking down, or 'denaturing', at high temperatures is one of the hottest topics in biotech. Researchers have now identified some of the principles behind how this works, potentially opening up a raft of industrial applications for designer proteins. (2020-12-11)

A simple rule drives the evolution of useless complexity
A new study at the University of Chicago has shown that elaborate protein structures accumulate over deep time even when they serve no purpose, because a universal biochemical property and the genetic code force natural selection to preserve them. (2020-12-09)

Defined blockade
The addition and removal of methyl groups on DNA plays an important role in gene regulation. In order to study these mechanisms more precisely, a German team has developed a new method by which specific methylation sites can be blocked and then unblocked at a precise time through irradiation with light (photocaging). As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the required regent is produced enzymatically, in situ. (2020-11-24)

Folding proteins feel the heat, and cold
A new study shows proteins that presumably evolved to avoid water as they fold may actually behave in ways scientists did not anticipate. (2020-11-11)

Solar perovskite production on a roll
High-performance perovskite solar cells are made using a manufacturing-friendly liquid-based process suitable for roll to roll production. (2020-11-10)

The applications of liquid crystals have been extended to drug encapsulation
Widely used in the manufacture of LCD screens and, more recently, phosphorescent sensors, liquid crystals may also have an important application in biomedicine. An international research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid has leveraged the structure of certain liquid crystal materials to encapsulate and transport water-insoluble compounds with characteristics similar to those of many anti-tumour drugs that are difficult to administer because of their high hydrophobicity. (2020-11-06)

Revealing the identity of the last unknown protein of autophagy
Japanese scientists discovered that Atg9, one of the proteins that function to mediate autophagy, has phospholipid-translocation activity (the lipid scramblase activity) between the two layers of the lipid bilayer?and elucidated that the protein's activity brings about autophagosome membrane expansion. The artificial control of autophagy is expected to promote the research and development of treating and preventing various diseases. (2020-11-04)

Lighting the way to selective membrane imaging
A team of scientists at Kanazawa University have shown how water-soluble tetraphenylethene molecules can become fluorescent when aggregating at a biomembrane-mimetic liquid-liquid interface. This work may lead to new optical molecular probes and smart vesicles for delivering pharmaceuticals directly to cells. (2020-11-04)

Root bacterium to fight Alzheimer's
A bacterium found among the soil close to roots of ginseng plants could provide a new approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's. Rhizolutin, a novel class of compounds with a tricyclic framework, significantly dissociates the protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease both in vivo and in vitro, as reported by scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-11-02)

Probing water for an electrifying cause
An experiment, elegant in its simplicity, helps explain why water becomes electrified when it touches hydrophobic surfaces. (2020-10-29)

Liquid nanofoam: A game changer for future football helmets
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, says a Michigan State University researcher. (2020-10-28)

Sapphires show their true colors: Not water-loving
The researchers investigated the wetting behavior of four different crystal surfaces of sapphire (alumina) single crystal and found that although the surface of polycrystalline alumina is hydrophilic (water contact angle was about 10°), the intrinsic water contact angles of all four crystal surfaces are greater than 10°. Among them, the (1-102) crystal surface is intrinsic hydrophobic, which water contact angle is close to 90°. (2020-10-10)

Human acid-sensing ion channel 1a inhibition by snake toxin Mambalgin1
USTC initially resolved the hASIC1a and freeze electron structure of the compound of hASCI1a and Mambalgin1 through freeze electron microscopic technology. (2020-09-27)

Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Multiresistant bacteria are a serious problem in hospital and healthcare environments. By forming a biofilm, these pathogens can colonize door handles and light switches and their presence on medical implants can lead to serious cases of post-operative infection. A team of physicists at Saarland University has now shown why hospital germs adhere strongly to surfaces from which water simply rolls off, but bind so poorly to surfaces that are easily wetted by water. (2020-09-16)

A chemist from RUDN developed a new type of one-molecule thick water-repellent film
A chemist from RUDN University together with colleagues created a new type of two-dimensional nanofilm from an organic material called calixarene. The invention can be used as a protective coating in electronics and as a part of molecular filters. They also suggested a way of increasing the durability of such films with UV radiation (2020-09-09)

A novel salvinia-like slippery surface
Inspired by the hydrophobic leaves of Salvinia molesta and the slippery Nepenthes pitcher plants, a Salvinia-like slippery surface (SSS) consisting of protrusions with slippery heads was designed. Compared to a control surface, the SSS exhibits increased stability against pressure and impact, the enhanced lateral mobility of water drops as well as the reduced hydrodynamic drag. (2020-08-28)

Research shows potential to improve paints, coatings
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York could lead to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings. (2020-08-25)

Novel method of heat conduction could be a game changer for server farms and aircraft
'We are hopeful that the one-way heat transfer of our bridging-droplet diode will enable the smart thermal management of electronics, aircraft, and spacecraft,' said Boreyko. (2020-08-18)

Liquid crystals that can replace color shifting ink in preventing counterfeiting
A research team in Korea has developed a material that may potentially replace color shifting ink in prevention of forgery of bank notes, ID cards, and so on. A team headed by Dr. Sang-seok Lee from the Functional Composite Material Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology successfully developed a technology to fabricate liquid crystals Liquid crystal comprised of several layers with a thickness comparable to that of a hair strand using hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. (2020-08-14)

Dynamic membranes set to solve problems of liquid waste treatment
The co-authors, Associate Professor Dinar Fazullin and Associate Professor Gennady Mavrin, have been engaged in the topic of membrane elements for water purification for ten years. This research area is very pertinent because of the large volumes of liquid waste and a lack of specialized types of membranes. (2020-08-14)

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference
A multi-institution research team led by Andre ? D. Taylor, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering demonstrated a novel approach to MXene fabrication that could lead to methods for at-scale production of MXene freestanding films: drop-casting onto prepatterned hydrophobic substrates. Their method led to a 38% enhancement of EMI shielding efficiency over conventional methods. (2020-08-10)

A simple screening process may enhance monoclonal antibody-based drug development
By screening potential monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based drugs solely based on a measure of their colloidal stability, scientists may be able to weed out mAbs that do not respond efficiently in solution early in the (2020-07-31)

Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants
Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. The team developed two approaches to control the functions of plant proteins related to the transport of hydrophobic pollutants. These findings will lead to these new functions of pesticides being utilized in agriculture, enabling safer crops to be produced. (2020-07-27)

Solar-driven membrane distillation technology that can double drinking water production
A joint research team from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), led by Dr. Kyung-guen Song from the KIST Water Cycle Research Center and Dr. Won-jun Choi from the KIST Center for Opto-Electronic Materials and Devices, announced that it had used solar heat, a source of renewable energy, to develop a highly efficient membrane distillation technology that can produce drinking water from seawater or wastewater. (2020-07-22)

New research finds graphene can act as surfactant
New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing. (2020-07-22)

Wrapping up hydrophobic hydration
Studied in detail, the embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed. (2020-06-29)

From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier
We all know that there are ''good'' and ''bad'' bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become ''bad'' or ''pathogenic'' and cause disease. Now, in a new study published in PLoS Pathogens, a team of scientists from Okayama University, Japan, described how mutations resulting in the malformation of the lipopolysaccharide transporter--an essential protein for bacterial growth--caused a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain to become pathogenic. (2020-06-25)

When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish
Most duplicated gene copies either evolve new roles or lose their ability to code for proteins. But some duplicate pairs persist for millions of years for reasons that have puzzled scientists for decades. A new yeast study finds that some duplicates can't change because they are constrained by the dependency between their cellular role and the molecular structure of the proteins they encode. (2020-06-25)

Simple device monitors health using sweat
A device that monitors health conditions in the body using a person's sweat has been developed by Penn State and Xiangtan University researchers, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics, Penn State. (2020-06-23)

Better than cyclodextrins
Molecular containers that remove drugs, toxins, or malodorous substances from the environment are called sequestering agents. Scientists have developed a class of molecular containers that specifically sequester neurotransmitter antagonists. The barrel-shaped molecules called Pillar[n]MaxQ bind neuromuscular blocking chemicals 100,000-fold more tightly than established macrocyclic detoxification agents, the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-06-17)

Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact. (2020-06-09)

Smart sponge could clean up oil spills
Researchers have developed a highly porous smart sponge that selectively soaks up oil in water. It can absorb more than 30 times its weight and be reused many dozens of times. (2020-05-28)

New antiviral, antibacterial surface could reduce spread of infections in hospitals
The novel coronavirus pandemic has caused an increased demand for antimicrobial treatments that can keep surfaces clean, particularly in health care settings. Although some surfaces have been developed that can combat bacteria, what's been lacking is a surface that can also kill off viruses. Now, researchers have found a way to impart durable antiviral and antibacterial properties to an aluminum alloy used in hospitals, according to a report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. (2020-05-27)

A replaceable, more efficient filter for N95 masks
Since the outbreak of COVID-19, there's been a worldwide shortage of face masks -- particularly, the N95 ones worn by health care workers. Although these coverings provide the highest level of protection currently available, they have limitations. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a membrane that can be attached to a regular N95 mask and replaced when needed. The filter has a smaller pore size than normal N95 masks, potentially blocking more virus particles. (2020-05-21)

New device quickly detects lithium ions in blood of bipolar disorder patients
A group of Hokkaido University researchers has developed a paper-based device that can easily and cheaply measure lithium ion concentration in blood, which could greatly help bipolar disorder patients. (2020-05-20)

Material manufacturing from particles takes a giant step forward
Tiny fibrils extracted from plants have been getting a lot of attention for their strength. These nanomaterials have shown great promise in outperforming plastics, and even replacing them. A team led by Aalto University has now shown another remarkable property of nanocelluloses: their strong binding properties to form new materials with any particle. (2020-05-11)

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