Current Hydrothermal Vents News and Events

Current Hydrothermal Vents News and Events, Hydrothermal Vents News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 17 | 649 Results
Reawakened geyser does not foretell Yellowstone volcanic eruptions, study shows
Geyser eruptions, like volcanic eruptions, are a mystery, so the reactivation of Steamboat Geyser in Yellowstone in 2018 provided an opportunity to explore why geysers turn off and on, and what determines their periodicity. A team led by UC Berkeley researchers found little evidence of magma moving below the geyser, meaning no sign of imminent hydrothermal eruptions, but did discover a relationship between the height of the column and the depth of the water reservoir. (2021-01-04)

SwRI-led team finds meteoric evidence for a previously unknown asteroid
A Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists has identified a potentially new meteorite parent asteroid by studying a small shard of a meteorite that arrived on Earth a dozen years ago. The composition of a piece of the meteorite Almahata Sitta (AhS) indicates that its parent body was an asteroid roughly the size of Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt, and formed in the presence of water under intermediate temperatures and pressures. (2020-12-21)

New path to rare earth mineral formation has implications for green energy and smart tech
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have shed new light on the formation mechanisms of a rare earth-bearing mineral that is in increasingly high demand across the globe for its use in the green energy and tech industries. Their discovery has important economic implications because there are no substitute alternatives to these rare earth elements, which are indispensable for smart devices and low-carbon energy generation (e.g., electronics, wind turbines, hybrid cars). (2020-12-17)

SwRI models point to a potentially diverse metabolic menu at Enceladus
Using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) modeled chemical processes in the subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The studies indicate the possibility that a varied metabolic menu could support a potentially diverse microbial community in the liquid water ocean beneath the moon's icy facade. (2020-12-16)

Making cheaper, biocompatible E-skin electrodes
DGIST materials scientists and colleagues in Korea have improved electrical conductivity in a polymer electrode for E-skin applications. Their approach is simple and cheap, but further enhancements are needed for the polymer to become a viable alternative to more expensive gold electrodes. The scientists published their findings in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics. (2020-12-10)

'Fun size' Cas9 nucleases hold promise for easier genome editing
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have described two new, compact Cas9 nucleases, the cutting components of CRISPR-Cas systems, that will potentially expand the Cas9 toolbox for genome editing. In vitro studies and experiments in bacteria showed that these two nucleases are efficient at cleaving DNA, and the P. pneumotropica Cas9 nuclease is active in human cells. (2020-12-10)

Vitamin boosts essential synthetic chemistry
Inspired by light-sensing bacteria that thrive near hot oceanic vents, synthetic chemists use vitamin B12 to catalyze valuable hydrocarbons known as olefins, or alkenes. The mild process eliminates harsh chemicals typically needed to make precursor molecules for the manufacture of drugs and agrochemicals. (2020-12-08)

To accelerate or decelerate in the light-emitting process of zinc-oxide crystals
A recent study has measured the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of Zinc-Oxide (ZnO) crystals in both the light-emitting process and non-light-emitting process. (2020-12-06)

Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
New research at the Brothers submarine arc volcano sheds light on the complexity of microbial composition on the seafloor and provides insights into how past and the present subsurface process could be imprinted in microbial diversity. (2020-11-30)

WSU scientists discover new, simple way to classify marine biomes
Washington State University scientists have developed a new way to classify the ocean's diverse environments, shedding new light on how marine biomes are defined and changed by nature and humans. (2020-11-20)

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water. This work may lead to advances in treating contaminated wastewater. (2020-11-19)

Scientists propose potential method for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy
A joint research team led by Prof. WANG Hui and Prof. LIN Wenchu from the High Magnetic Field Laboratory of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science developed a synthesis of metal-free multifunctional therapeutic reagents, called graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots embedded in carbon nanosheets (CNQD-CN), via a one-step hydrothermal treatment. (2020-10-15)

A new land surface model to monitor global river water environment
Incorporating schemes related to nitrogen transport and human activities into land surface models could be an effective way to monitor global river water quality and diagnose the performance of the land surface modeling. (2020-10-14)

Planetary astronomer co-authors studies of asteroid as member of NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission
NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft mission's first attempt to pick up the sample is scheduled for Oct. 20, 2020, and the spacecraft is scheduled to return the sample back to Earth on Sept. 24, 2023. In advance of the sample collection, the science team published a set of six papers in Science and Science Advances to share its scientific findings to date while building interest in the upcoming event. (2020-10-08)

Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution
Electric clothes dryers (tumble dryers) may be a hitherto unsuspected source of microfibers, widely emitting fibers from laundry into the environment through their vents, according to an experimental study. (2020-10-07)

Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure, study suggests
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. (2020-09-29)

Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire. (2020-09-15)

Rebirth of a volcano
Continued volcanic activity after the collapse of a volcano has not been documented in detail so far. Now and for the first time, researchers from the German Research Center for Geosciences GFZ and Russian volcanologists are presenting the results of a photogrammetric data series spanning seven decades for the Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka, in the journal ''Nature Communications Earth and Environment''. (2020-09-10)

Study pinpoints process that might have led to first organic molecules
New research led by the American Museum of Natural History and funded by NASA identifies a process that might have been key in producing the first organic molecules on Earth about 4 billion years ago, before the origin of life. The process, which is similar to what might have occurred in some ancient underwater hydrothermal vents, may also have relevance to the search for life elsewhere in the universe. (2020-09-08)

Revisiting ratios
There's more to seawater than salt. Ocean chemistry is a complex mixture of particles, ions and nutrients. And for over a century, scientists believed that certain ion ratios held relatively constant over space and time. (2020-09-01)

Trapping of acetylene
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers describe a robust and regenerable porous metal-organic framework that captures acetylene with extraordinary efficiency and selectively. Its synergistic combination of tailor-made pore sizes and chemical docking sites makes the material especially efficient, the study says. (2020-08-27)

Study reveals two major microbial groups can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface. A publication in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that these groups, originally thought to rely on symbiotic relationships with other organisms, may also live independently and use an ancient mode of energy production. (2020-08-25)

Cyclohexyl phenyl sulfide cleavage studied for degradation of sulfur-containing heavy oil
So far, the KFU team has proven copper compounds are the most effective in producing catalysts for heavy oil extraction. (2020-08-20)

Oregon study rewrites the recent history of productive Cascade Arc volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions in the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest over the last 2.6 million years are more numerous and closely connected to subsurface signatures of currently active magma than commonly thought, according to newly publish research. (2020-08-14)

Origins of life: Chemical evolution in a tiny Gulf Stream
Chemical reactions driven by the geological conditions on the early Earth might have led to the prebiotic evolution of self-replicating molecules. Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich now report on a hydrothermal mechanism that could have promoted the process. (2020-08-07)

Way, shape and form: Synthesis conditions define the nanostructure of manganese dioxide
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology explore a novel and simplistic method to synthesize manganese dioxide with a specific crystalline structure called β-MnO2. Their study sheds light on how different synthesis conditions can produce manganese dioxide with distinct porous structures, hinting at a strategy for the development of highly tuned MnO2 nanomaterials that could serve as catalysts in the fabrication of bioplastics. (2020-07-31)

In HEPA we trust: making the indoors safer during COVID
As schools and offices prepare to reopen, Syracuse University Professor Jianshun 'Jensen' Zhang offers a three-step plan to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and help prevent the spread of COVID indoors. Zhang's plan is detailed in a recent editorial published in the journal Science and Technology for the Built Environment entitled 'Integrating IAQ control strategies to reduce the risk of asymptomatic SARS CoV-2 infections in classrooms and open-plan offices.' (2020-07-29)

USTC made breakthrough in the Sb2(S,Se)3 solar cell efficiency
USTC developed a hydrothermal deposition method for the synthesis of antimony selenosulfide for solar cell applications. With this absorber material, the solar cell break the 10% benchmark efficiency barrier. This result has been published in Nature Energy entitled ''Hydrothermal deposition of antimony selenosulfide thin films enables solar cells with 10% efficiency''. (2020-07-24)

Photos may improve understanding of volcanic processes
The shape of volcanoes and their craters provide critical information on their formation and eruptive history. Techniques applied to photographs -- photogrammetry -- show promise and utility in correlating shape change to volcanic background and eruption activity. (2020-07-20)

Uplifting of Columbia River basalts opens window on how region was sculpted
Information drawn from analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of materials from exposed Columbia River basalts has provided insights about how magma from volcanic eruptions millions of years ago shaped the region and why those eruptions did not trigger a global extinction event. (2020-07-17)

High performance sodium-ion capacitors based on Nb2O5 nanotubes@carbon cloth
Nb2O5 nanotubes and nanowire-to-nanotube homojunctions were directly grown on carbon cloth (CC) from a simple hydrothermal process by adjusting the pH value and adding pyridine as growth regulator. The assembled Nb2O5@CC nanotubes//activated carbon (AC) sodium-ion capacitor with high energy/power densities of 195 Wh kg-1 and 7328 W kg-1 was released by Di Chen et al. in Science China Materials. (2020-06-17)

Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
The latest report from Global Reef Expedition scientists provides a promising assessment of coral reef health and resiliency in New Caledonia. (2020-06-01)

Surrey unveils fast-charging super-capacitor technology
Experts from the University of Surrey believe their dream of clean energy storage is a step closer after they unveiled their ground-breaking super-capacitor technology that is able to store and deliver electricity at high power rates, particularly for mobile applications. (2020-05-14)

Rich interface defects accelerate the electro-oxidation of 5-HMF
High concentration of interfacial sites with rich defects in a 3D hierarchical NiO-Co3O4 electrocatalyst for HMF electro-oxidation created abundant cation vacancies, modulated the electronic properties of Co and Ni atoms, and raised the oxidation states of Ni species. The catalysts showed a low onset potential of 1.28 V. Meanwhile, in-situ surface-selective vibrational spectroscopy of sum-frequency generation was performed to study the reaction pathway during the oxidation process on the electrocatalysts. (2020-05-09)

HKUST researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with impossible living condition. Unraveling the genome of this unique creature will not only shed light on how life evolved billions of years ago, but will also lay foundation for the discovery of potential remedies offered by these ancient creatures. (2020-04-28)

A rare snail living on wood is discovered in the Arctic ocean
Postgraduate student Ekaterina Krol and Senior Research Associate at the Department of Applied Ecology of St Petersburg University Ivan Nekhaev have found a marine snail from the subclass Neomphaliones in a collection from the Soviet Arctic expeditions of the 1930s. For over 70 years, it has been mistakenly placed in another family of marine molluscs. It is noteworthy that representatives of the subclass Neomphaliones have been found in such specific habitats as sunken wood and hydrothermal vents. (2020-04-22)

New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. They also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. What is particularly remarkable is that the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, this could allow to use these microbes to produce ethane as an energy source. The study has now been published in the journal mBio. (2020-04-21)

Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment. Dangerous toxins which usually have to be used to produce theses polymers can be substituted by water. (2020-04-21)

Valorizing wastewater can improve commercial viability of biomass oil production
Oil produced from biomass can provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. But technological challenges make it difficult to scale up production. A new study from the University of Illinois discusses methods to manage wastewater from biocrude oil production, providing a possible path to commercially viable production. (2020-04-17)

Deep-sea worms and bacteria team up to harvest methane
Scientists uncover an unusual partnership at the bottom of the ocean. (2020-04-03)

Page 1 of 17 | 649 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.