Current Hygiene News and Events

Current Hygiene News and Events, Hygiene News Articles.
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Survey: Most Americans say they'll continue health precautions after COVID-19
A new national survey of more than 2,000 Americans by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds most plan to continue many of the pandemic precautions in the name of public health, even when the pandemic is over. (2021-02-08)

Your toothbrush reflects you, not your toilet
After studying microbial communities living on bristles from used toothbrushes, Northwestern University researchers found those communities matched microbes commonly found inside the mouth and on skin. (2021-02-01)

Schoolchildren are learning about health through football (soccer)
Knowledge about health is a cornerstone in a child's development of physical and psychosocial health. A new study from the University of Southern Denmark shows that health knowledge in relation to diet, exercise, hygiene and wellbeing can be increased through a programme of European football exercises as part of school lessons. (2021-01-29)

Study pins down number of Americans with most common form of lupus
Just over 200,000 Americans suffer from systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE, a condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy tissues, especially joints and skin, a new study shows. (2021-01-21)

Water and gender equality
New Stanford research finds installing piped water in rural Zambian homes frees up time in the daily lives of women and girls, while also promoting economic growth and food security - making an argument for piped water infrastructure investments across rural, low-income areas. (2021-01-14)

Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, Yale scientists say
In a paper published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell, four Yale immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies -- the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods. (2021-01-14)

TU Graz identifies bacterium that protects rice plants against diseases
With their expertise in microbiome research, the researchers at the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology were able to demonstrate how a specific bacterium inside the seeds of rice plants effectively and in an eco-friendly way inhibits destructive plant pathogens. (2021-01-11)

Three-site study highlight effectiveness of FEND nasal calcium rich salts
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts and Bangalore, India study the effectiveness of FEND product to significantly improve airway hygiene by reducing and suppressing respiratory droplets potentially containing airborne pathogens and other contaminants. (2021-01-11)

COVID-19 and dental and dental hygiene students' career plans
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted dental education and training. The study ''COVID-19 and Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Career Plans,'' published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), examined the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental hygiene and dental students' career intentions. (2021-01-07)

Fatal health threat to young African children reduced by innovative artistic intervention
The fatal threat from diarrhoea and pneumonia to young children in the world's poorer countries can be drastically reduced by using traditional performing arts to encourage mothers to provide youngsters with safe food and water, a new study reveals. (2021-01-07)

New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has published a new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults. (2020-12-16)

Caregiver burden in dementia during the COVID19 crisis
Caregivers of people with dementia and milder forms of neurocognitive disorder bear a heavy burden. They are constantly confronted with challenging symptoms and behaviors and feel they are up against their limits. The latest results from a study indicate that the COVID 19 crisis affects this burden since the pandemic has mental health implications (2020-12-07)

Race/ethnicity among children with COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome
The distribution of race/ethnicity among cases of COVID-19]-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children reported to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is described in this observational study. (2020-11-30)

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 via pork meat unlikely according to current state of knowledge
State media in China have claimed that a worker has become infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) from a knuckle of pork imported from Germany. The infection is reported to have taken place in a cold store. Traces of SARS-CoV-2 were detected on packaging as well as on a door knob. (2020-11-19)

Young asymptomatic 'super spreaders' keep malaria viable by infecting local mosquitoes
The new findings, reported today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), reveal a hidden reservoir that's a barrier to long-term efforts to eliminate malaria and an immediate threat for disease resurgence if control measures like bednets and indoor spraying falter. (2020-11-18)

When temperatures rise, dog ticks more likely to choose humans over canines
A variety of ticks that carry the bacteria causing the deadly disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) are more than twice as likely to shift their feeding preference from dogs to humans when temperatures rise, a sign that climate change could expand and intensify human disease risks, according to a new study presented today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). (2020-11-16)

The dangers of collecting drinking water
Fetching drinking water in low and middle income countries can cause serious injury, particularly for women. A new international study published in BMJ Global Health reveals dangers including falls, traffic accidents, animal attacks, and fights, which can result in broken bones, spinal injuries, lacerations, and other physical injuries. The work draws on a survey of 6,291 randomly selected households across 24 sites in 21 low- and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. (2020-11-04)

Drug-resistant hospital bacteria persist even after deep cleaning
Scientists have used genome sequencing to reveal the extent to which a drug-resistant gastrointestinal bacterium can spread within a hospital, highlighting the challenge hospitals face in controlling infections. (2020-10-26)

The first ever international Wounds Week was a resounding success
The 8th International Skin Integrity and Infection Prevention Conference: Demystifying Wound Infection: Improving Patient Outcomes was redesigned into an online Wounds Week and has proved to be so successful it will most certainly happen again. (2020-10-26)

Preventive drugs halve malaria cases in African schoolchildren
Giving preventive drugs to school-age children in Africa substantially reduces malaria infections and cases of anaemia, according to a new study in The Lancet Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Cognitive behavioral therapy reduces insomnia symptoms among young drinkers
More than half of young adults at risk for alcohol-related harm report symptoms of insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the first-line treatments for insomnia, but it's never been tested on young adults who are actively drinking. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine evaluated CBT's effect on young adult binge drinkers with insomnia to determine if this treatment can improve their sleep and potentially affect alcohol use outcomes. (2020-10-20)

Covid-19: Pooled testing among recommendations to fix test, trace and isolate system
In a series of recommendations to fix the struggling Covid-19 test, trace and isolate system in England, health researchers from University College London and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine say that pooled testing for Covid-19 could significantly increase testing capacity in a relatively short space of time and help with the identification of asymptomatic cases in key workers. (2020-10-16)

AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-15)

Will SARS-CoV-2 become endemic?
To date, a few verified repeat SARS-CoV-2 infections have been documented around the world. (2020-10-14)

Cause of 1990s Argentina cholera epidemic uncovered
The evolution of epidemic and endemic strains of the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae in Argentina has been mapped in detail. The researchers used whole genome sequencing to study the bacteria circulating during the 1991-1998 outbreak of cholera in the country. Published in Nature Communications, the data have influenced health policy in Argentina, where whole-genome sequencing is now used to distinguish between pandemic and non-pandemic lineages of V. cholerae bacteria. (2020-10-01)

Consumers who avoid products with harmful chemicals on the label have lower body burden
New research shows that paying close attention to what's in the products you buy can pay off. In a study led by Silent Spring Institute, researchers found that consumers who avoided products containing specific endocrine disruptors had significantly lower levels of the chemicals in their bodies. (2020-09-30)

Nasal calcium rich salts show reduction of exhaled aerosol particles up to 99%
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts have discovered a more effective way of eliminating airborne particles from airways using nasal calcium-rich salts called FEND, which have potential applications in the fight against Covid-19. (2020-09-29)

Black and Hispanic people in US face increased risk of testing positive for coronavirus
Individuals from Black and Hispanic backgrounds in the United States are twice as likely to test positive for COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to new research in PLOS Medicine. Led by researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and Yale University, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the study found this disparity even after accounting for factors such as underlying health conditions, where they live and where they receive care. (2020-09-22)

Poor home hygiene contributing to antibiotic resistance, warn global hygiene experts
It is estimated that rates of resistance to commonly-used antibiotics could exceed 40-60% in some countries by 2030. With AMR set to claim the lives of 10 million by 2050 if no action is taken, the GHC's experts are calling for a review of hygiene practices in homes and everyday life to ensure that they are effective and appropriate to the urgent public health issues we currently face, such as AMR and COVID-19. (2020-09-11)

Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater -- which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater -- is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals. With an ever-increasing human population, water shortages are already occurring in many areas are only expected to get worse. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have estimated the freshwater supply and demand of about 11,000 water basins across the globe, determining that one-fourth of freshwater consumption exceeds regional capacities. (2020-09-02)

Following 'Eatwell Guide' diet could reduce your risk of dying early and lower your environmental footprint
Adhering to Public Health England's 'Eatwell Guide' of a balanced diet could reduce your chance of dying prematurely and lower your environmental footprint, according to a new study in BMJ Open. (2020-08-26)

Study finds 'nomophobia' is associated with poor sleep health in college students
A new study found that the fear of being out of mobile phone contact -- 'nomophobia' -- is extremely common among college students and is associated with poor sleep health. (2020-08-26)

Poor hygiene is significant risk for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization
Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. (2020-08-14)

Nepal lockdown halved health facility births and increased stillbirths and newborn deaths
COVID-19 response has resulted in major reductions in health facility births in Nepal and widened inequalities, with significantly increased institutional stillbirth and neonatal mortality, according to a new study in the Lancet Global Health. The research was led Dr Ashish KC and Nepal colleagues with Uppsala University, Sweden, and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. It is the first published study with primary data on the impact of a COVID-19 lockdown on births in hospital, and measuring stillbirths and newborn deaths. (2020-08-10)

Four-compartment modeling can help determine best COVID-19 control strategy
Researchers in China identified four key population categories useful in guiding COVID-19 public health policies aimed at minimizing the spread of the disease and reducing fatalities. The team, led by Dr. Baoguo Jiang of the Department of Orthopedics & Traumatology at Peking University People's Hospital, published their findings in the journal Precision Clinical Medicine on May 28. (2020-08-04)

Keep safe and cool in the pool: Novel chip sensor makes swimming pools safer
A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety and hygiene for more than 2.7 million Australians as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management. (2020-07-29)

University of Cincinnati ergonomics expert says work smarter at home
Millions of office workers have been sent home to work remotely in the midst of COVID-19. But how many of them have gotten in guidance or equipment to support good ergonomics. Static posture or position could lead to back, neck and shoulder injury. (2020-07-28)

Existing evidence suggests face coverings do not lead to false sense of security
Existing limited evidence suggests that wearing face coverings to protect against COVID-19 does not lead to a false sense of security and is unlikely to increase the risk of infection through wearers foregoing other behaviours such as good hand hygiene, say researchers from the University of Cambridge and King's College London. (2020-07-26)

New study explains 'miracle' of how the Warsaw Ghetto beat Typhus
Through state-of-the-art mathematical modelling and historical documents, a new study points to community health programs and social distancing practices as the most likely explanations for the epidemic's sudden and mysterious collapse, which was hailed by survivors at the time as a miracle. (2020-07-24)

AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). We've highlighted below those that we think may of interest for your reporting. (2020-07-22)

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