Current Hypertonic Saline News and Events

Current Hypertonic Saline News and Events, Hypertonic Saline News Articles.
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A comparative study of surface hardness between two bioceramic materials
This study aimed to evaluate the setting behaviour of MTA Angelus and NeoMTA by comparing their hardness after placing them in dry and moist conditions. (2021-02-16)

The Arctic Ocean was covered by a shelf ice and filled with freshwater
Scientists from Alfred Wegener Institute: ''We need to have a fresh look at the role of the Arctic Ocean.'' (2021-02-03)

Study finds COVID-19 attack on brain, not lungs, triggers severe disease in mice
Georgia State University biology researchers have found that infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus. (2021-01-19)

NYUAD scientists uncover the genomic differences of marine and freshwater microalgae
NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Associate Professor of Biology Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani and NYUAD Senior Research Scientist David Nelson report in a new study that they have successfully cultured and sequenced 107 microalgae species from 11 different phyla indigenous to varied locations and climates to gain insights on genomic differences in saltwater and freshwater microalgae. (2021-01-11)

Three-site study highlight effectiveness of FEND nasal calcium rich salts
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts and Bangalore, India study the effectiveness of FEND product to significantly improve airway hygiene by reducing and suppressing respiratory droplets potentially containing airborne pathogens and other contaminants. (2021-01-11)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss. In other words, if someone was given ketamine to kill pain associated with a battlefield injury, they would be able to tolerate blood loss just as well as someone who did not received this pain killer. (2020-10-21)

All-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon
A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models. (2020-10-15)

Novel Radioimmunotherapy Reverses Resistance to Commonly Used Lymphoma Drug
A new radioimmunotherapy has proven effective in reversing resistance to the most commonly used lymphoma drug, rituximab, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. When used in combination with rituximab, 177Lu-lilotomab-satetraxetan was shown to substantially increase rituximab binding and rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, resulting in significant tumor growth delay in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mouse model. (2020-10-08)

Preheating gelatin as a facile approach to increase 3D printing duration
SUTD researchers' new approach finds that preheating gelatin extended its 3D printing time compared to freshly prepared gelatin and enhanced the printability of the ink, which is essential for extrusion-based bioprinting and food printing. (2020-09-29)

Nasal calcium rich salts show reduction of exhaled aerosol particles up to 99%
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts have discovered a more effective way of eliminating airborne particles from airways using nasal calcium-rich salts called FEND, which have potential applications in the fight against Covid-19. (2020-09-29)

Attacking tumors from the inside
A new technology that allows researchers to peer inside malignant tumors shows that two experimental drugs can normalize aberrant blood vessels, oxygenation, and other aspects of the tumor microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), helping to suppress the tumor's growth and spread, UT Southwestern researchers report. (2020-09-03)

Dilated blood vessels in the lung may explain low oxygen levels in severe cases of COVID-19
A new pilot study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai suggests that COVID-19 is causing significant dilation of the blood vessels of the lung, specifically the capillaries. (2020-08-20)

Green apple e-cigarette flavorant triggers reward-related behavior in the brain
A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward, which could heighten reward and drug-seeking behavior, according to researchers at Marshall University. (2020-08-18)

Placebos prove powerful even when people know they're taking one
A team of researchers from Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Dartmouth College is the first to demonstrate that placebos reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking one (2020-08-06)

Reducing the adverse impact of water loss in cells
A University of Houston College of Medicine researcher has found how a protein inside the body reduces the adverse effects of hypertonicity, an imbalance of water and solutes inside cells, which leads to cell death. (2020-08-04)

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting
The tension in the membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localised drop in tension makes it easier for the surface to be bending inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell. Are the functions of these so-called endosomes also modulated by variations in tension? Scientists have answered in the affirmative thanks to a high-precision research, using molecular probes. (2020-08-03)

Green apple flavor in vapes enhances nicotine reward
A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward and is also rewarding itself, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro. (2020-08-03)

Nasal saline irrigations in a pandemic
The overall safety and benefits of using nasal saline irrigations on viral upper respiratory infections during a pandemic, such as COVID-19, are discussed in this Viewpoint. (2020-07-23)

A micro-lab on a chip detects blood type within minutes
The need to first zero in on a blood group can delay blood transfusions in emergency situations, and this in turn can prove fatal. Thus, to speed up the process, a team of scientists from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, has developed a lab-on-a-chip device that can not only tell the blood type within five minutes but allows medical staff to read the results through simple visual inspections. (2020-07-13)

Antihistamines and similar drugs could slow down Huntington's disease
Scientists have described a potential new therapeutic strategy for slowing down early-stage Huntington's disease in a new study published today in eLife. (2020-06-09)

Can oilfield water safely be reused for irrigation in California?
Reusing low-saline oilfield water mixed with surface water to irrigate farms in the Cawelo Water District of California does not pose major health risks, as some opponents of the practice have feared, a study led by Duke University and RTI International researchers finds. This finding only applies to questions about the safety in this water district, however. Oilfield water elsewhere will have different chemistry and salinity. (2020-05-22)

May/June 2020 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines. (2020-05-12)

Arthritis clinical trial shows support for dextrose injection to alleviate knee pain
A randomized controlled trial conducted by a research team at a primary care clinic at the Chinese University of Hong Kong indicates that intra-articular-only injection therapy with hypertonic dextrose is safe and effective for alleviating symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. (2020-05-12)

Chemicals used to replace BPA may lead to increased blood pressure
Common bisphenol A (BPA) substitutes can affect the developing fetus and cause hypertension in later life, suggests a rodent study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting. The research will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-30)

A new low-cost solar technology for environmental cooling
A study conducted by the Politecnico di Torino (Italy), in collaboration with the National Metrological Research Institute (INRiM) and recently published on Science Advances, proposes a new technology for space cooling. No electricity is needed, but rather salty water possibly produced exploiting solar radiation (2020-03-23)

Patients with exercise-related hyponatremia advised to 'drink to thirst'
Hyponatremia is a condition of low sodium concentration in the blood. Prolonged overhydration during exercise is the primary cause of all forms of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) and should be avoided. The updated EAH clinical practice guidelines issued by the Wilderness Medical Society stress that individuals engaged in physical and endurance activities should drink to satisfy their thirst (known as ''drink to thirst'') to avoid overhydration. The guidelines appear in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier. (2020-03-18)

New method gives glaucoma researchers control over eye pressure
Neuroscientists have developed a new method that permits continuous regulation of eye pressure without damage, becoming the first to definitively prove pressure in the eye is sufficient to cause and explain glaucoma. (2020-02-24)

Research identifies barriers to development of seawater electrolysis technologies
Researchers at the University Of Liverpool, in collaboration with NUI Galway and TU Berlin, have identified the key technological and scientific challenges of producing hydrogen through seawater electrolysis. (2020-02-19)

Masking the memory of fear: Treating anxiety disorders such as PTSD with an opioid
While fear memory -- or the ability to remember contexts in which to be afraid -- is important for survival, too much of it, and an inability to forget contexts that no longer apply, hinders daily activities. Recently, scientists from Japan found that a certain opioid drug can help mask some fear memory without causing undesirable side effects. This could make new therapies possible for anxiety disorders like phobias or PTSD. (2020-02-18)

Microscopic partners could help plants survive stressful environments
Tiny, symbiotic fungi play an outsized role in helping plants survive stresses like drought and extreme temperatures, which could help feed a planet experiencing climate change, report scientists at Washington State University. (2020-01-29)

Directly measuring function in tiny hearts
The amount of blood the heart pumps in one minute can be directly measured safely in newborns by monitoring changes in blood velocity after injecting saline, indicates the first clinical study of direct cardiac output measurement in newborns. (2020-01-08)

Sinuses bothering you? Use those nasal sprays regularly
Many chronic rhinosinusitis patients worry about overuse of antibiotics. A University of Cincinnati researcher says appropriate use of nasal saline and corticosteroid sprays can curtail their fears. (2019-12-17)

Australian GPs widely offering placebos, new study finds
Most Australian GPs have used a placebo in practice at least once, with active placebos (active treatments used primarily to generate positive expectations) more commonly used than inert placebos, according to a new study from University of Sydney. (2019-12-02)

Testing barley's salt tolerance is a numbers game
Factors influencing the tolerance of barley to saline soils have been uncovered using an advanced robust statistical technique. (2019-12-02)

Chronic opioid treatment may increase PTSD risk
Long-term (chronic) treatment with opioids, such as morphine, prior to trauma enhances fear learning in mice, according to a study published in Neuropsychopharmacology. The findings, which link chronic opioid treatment before a traumatic event with responses to subsequent stressful events, may suggest a possible mechanism underlying the frequent co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid dependence. (2019-12-01)

Coated seeds may enable agriculture on marginal lands
Providing seeds with a protective coating that also supplies essential nutrients to the germinating plant could make it possible to grow crops in otherwise unproductive soils, according to new research at MIT. (2019-11-25)

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life
Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on our planet, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia. (2019-11-22)

FSU research: Ketamine could help men suffering from alcohol use disorder
Research from Florida State University is giving physicians a better understanding of ketamine, a potentially useful tool in treating depression that still has unanswered questions. A team of researchers working in the laboratory of Mohamed Kabbaj, a professor of Biomedical Sciences and Neuroscience in the College of Medicine, showed that ketamine can decrease alcohol consumption in male rats that previously had consumed high amounts of alcohol when given unrestricted access several times a week. (2019-11-19)

Relevant social stimuli may reduce interest in drugs
Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA), specialized in addictive disorders, have demonstrated in an animal model that the presence of a relevant social stimulus reduces interest in cocaine. (2019-11-15)

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