Current Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy News and Events

Current Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy News and Events, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy News Articles.
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FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart
A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart. (2021-02-10)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

Temple researchers identify cardiac protein that causes different types of heart failure
Heart damage typically progresses, owing to oxidative stress and toxic lipids that alter heart cell energetics and the heart's ability to function normally. Oxidative stress occurs when harmful oxygen-containing molecules outnumber helpful antioxidants, leading to damaging reactions with proteins, DNA, and other cell components. Temple researchers show that in the heart, Kruppel-like factor-5, fuels both the generation of oxidizing molecules and the accumulation of toxic lipids known as ceramides in the heart, exacerbating heart dysfunction. (2021-01-13)

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 2
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the second issue of Volume 5. This issue brings together important research from authors in the USA and China, and includes new papers on 'Current Management Strategies in Patients with Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation' and 'Epicardial Adipose Tissue in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.' (2020-12-22)

New mechanism of force transduction in muscle cells discovered
Researchers at the University of M√ľnster (Germany) have now discovered how the muscle-specific adhesion molecule metavinculin modulates mechanical force transduction on the molecular level. The research results have just been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-18)

Predicting heart disease from the skin
Jefferson researchers find that the genetic underpinnings of a skin disorder at birth indicate future heart problems. (2020-12-10)

Genetic variants linked to heart health in African American childhood cancer survivors
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified genetic variants in African American childhood cancer survivors that have implications for up-front care and long-term surveillance. (2020-12-07)

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition. So-called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease of the heart that can occur during extreme stress events. Heart and hormone research teams in Bochum and Mannheim have now shown that there is apparently a strong link between the occurrence of Takotsubo syndrome and impaired thyroid function in patients. (2020-12-01)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy guideline encourages shared decision-making
The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology today released an updated guideline for managing patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The guideline encourages shared decision-making between the clinician and patient as essential when determining treatment course and updates recommendations for sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk assessment and HCM center referrals based on the latest evidence. (2020-11-20)

Importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy
Importance of Mitochondrial-Related Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Based on Bioinformatics Analysis. In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0588, Yukuan Chen, Xiaohui Wu, Danchun Hu and Wei Wang, from the Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China and Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China consider the importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-19)

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure. This landmark discovery found a correlation between the clumping of RNA-binding proteins long linked to neurodegenerative disease and the aggregates of protein found in the heart tissue of patients with RBM20 dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-18)

A change of heart -- new drug for HCM reduces heart mass
For the first time, a medication has impacted heart muscle thickness and function for patients with the most common inherited heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rather than simply addressing their symptoms. (2020-11-16)

New medication may treat underlying causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Mavacamten, a new investigational cardiac medication, may improve heart function for people with thickened heart muscle leading to obstructed blood flow through the heart, a condition known as obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The treatment appears to improve heart structure, reduce cardiac filling pressures (decrease measures of stiffness) and restore normal mitral valve motion. (2020-11-09)

Genetic mutation could worsen heart function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients
DALLAS - Nov. 4, 2020 - A mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis may accelerate heart function decline in those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a new study by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The findings, published online recently in the Journal of the American Heart Association, could help doctors develop new strategies to preserve heart function in this population, potentially extending patients' lives. (2020-11-04)

Cardiac MRI contrast agents carry low risk of adverse events
Contrast agents used to improve views of the heart on MRI carry a very low risk of allergic reactions, vomiting and other acute adverse events, according to a large new study. The findings come three years after the European Union enacted new regulations on the contrast agents. (2020-10-29)

Study reinforces drug's potential to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
WSU research sheds new light on a molecule that may be used to treat heart conditions that can lead to stroke, heart attack and other forms of heart disease. (2020-10-27)

Research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating
New research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating. The findings could someday lead to improved diagnostics and medical treatments for serious and sometimes devastating hereditary heart conditions. (2020-10-14)

Spouses of ICU patients may be at increased risk for cardiac events or hospitalization
The intensive care unit (ICU) admission of one spouse can be a risk factor for a cardiovascular event for the other spouse within a few weeks after the first spouse's ICU hospitalization. In this review of a Japanese medical database, spouses of patients admitted to the ICU for more than two days were themselves more likely to visit a doctor or be hospitalized for a cardiovascular reason compared to people without a spouse in the ICU. (2020-10-05)

Vigorous exercise, spongy heart
Sscientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares have used cardiac magnetic resonance technology to measure exercise-related hypertrabeculation in a general, non-athlete population. The results of the study have important practical implications because misdiagnosis of noncompaction cardiomyopathy in people who exercise regularly (whether professional athletes or amateurs) can trigger medical recommendations to stop physical exercise unnecessarily (2020-10-05)

Analysis reveals heart-related side effects of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine
As the antimalarial drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have drawn attention as potential therapies for COVID-19 and are being widely used off-label, it's now more important than ever to have a thorough assessment of the safety of these medications. A recent analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology provides new insights. (2020-09-23)

Grappling with questions about how COVID-19 can affect the heart
For an issue once expected to occur mostly in patients with severe COVID-19, heart conditions following SARS-CoV-2 infection are much more prevalent, writes Eric Topol in a Perspective. (2020-09-23)

Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (2020-09-22)

Scientists reveal details about the first cat infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Spain
The IRTA-CReSA coronavirus research team, alongside researchers from IrsiCaixa, the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) and veterinarians from a veterinary hospital near Barcelona publish in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) the results of postoperative analyzes of COVID-19 positive cat necropsy. The study confirms that cats can become infected with SARS-CoV-2 without it affecting their health because they generate an effective immune response against the virus and cannot transmit it to humans. (2020-09-21)

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure - and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne. The study was published on 8 September in Cell Reports. (2020-09-08)

Trial supports first specific treatment for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Mavacamten improves heart function and symptoms in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, according to results of the EXPLORER-HCM trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-31)

Study finds asymptomatic Chagas patients are at a high risk for cardiac disease
People living with Chagas disease without symptoms or signs of cardiac injury are at high risk of developing cardiomyopathy, a progressive heart disease, and the risk more than doubled among patients with acute infections, according to a new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-08-31)

Building the batteries of cells
A new study, led by Dr. Ruchika Anand and Prof. Andreas Reichert, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Germany, now found that two lipid-binding proteins located inside of mitochondria control the overall stability of these batteries. This study provides the first link between mitochondrial structure, lipids and assembly of large respiratory protein units of mitochondria and their importance in diabetes and heart diseases. (2020-08-11)

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 4 Issue 4
Beijing, 10 July 2020: the journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a new issue, Volume 4 Issue 4. This issue brings together important research papers from leading cardiologists in US, China, and Africa, including very important new research on identification of Novel TTN Mutations and discovery of digenic mutation. (2020-07-17)

UCalgary research study finds MRI effective in predicting major cardiac events
An international study led by Dr. James White, a clinician and researcher at the University of Calgary finds magnetic resonance imaging can be used to predict major cardiac events for people diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy. White's study confirms about 40 per cent of patients with DCM have scarring patterns on their heart muscle which can be seen with MRI. These patterns are associated with higher risk of future heart failure admissions, life-threatening heart rhythms and death. (2020-07-15)

Cleveland clinic researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic
CLEVELAND: Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-09)

Comparing stress cardiomyopathy before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Patients with acute coronary syndrome presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared with patients presenting at times prior to the pandemic to investigate the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy during the pandemic in this observational study. (2020-07-09)

Columbia and NewYork-Presbyterian study gets to heart of norms for elite female athletes
A new study from Columbia University and NewYork-Presbyterian provides physicians with valuable information on how the heart adapts to intense physical training for elite female athletes in the WNBA. (2020-06-24)

ETH researchers deconstruct tissue repair
ETH researchers have deconstructed the mechanisms that control wound healing and scar formation in more detail. To this end, biologists and engineers have developed a new method that allows the biomechanical properties of the healing tissue to be measured in vivo for the first time. (2020-06-03)

Heart attacks, heart failure, stroke: COVID-19's dangerous cardiovascular complications
A new guide from emergency medicine doctors details the potentially deadly cardiovascular complications COVID-19 can cause. (2020-05-15)

Surplus antioxidants are pathogenic for hearts and skeletal muscle
Oxidative stress can be pathological. Now researchers report that the other end of the redox spectrum, reductive stress, is also pathological. Reductive stress causes pathological heart enlargement and diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model. (2020-05-14)

Higher thrombus risk in men with obesity in adolescence
Men with a history of obesity in their late teens are, in adult life, more at risk of a blood clot (thrombus) in a leg or lung, according to a study from the University of Gothenburg study shows. The risk rises successively and is highest in those who were severely obese in adolescence. (2020-04-29)

Connecting the dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. New research from Mayo Clinic indicates that in patients with one specific type of heart disease ? obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ? the heart increases production of the ACE2 RNA transcript and the translated ACE2 protein. (2020-04-27)

Autoimmunity-associated heart dilation tied to heart-failure risk in type 1 diabetes
In people with type 1 diabetes without known cardiovascular disease, the presence of autoantibodies against heart muscle proteins was associated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evidence of increased volume of the left ventricle (the heart's main pumping chamber), increased muscle mass, and reduced pumping function (ejection fraction), features that are associated with higher risk of failure in the general population (2020-04-06)

Gene therapy reverses heart failure in mouse model of Barth syndrome
Barth syndrome is a rare genetic disease in boys that can cause life-threatening heart failure and also weakens the skeletal muscles and the immune system. There is no specific treatment, but new research at Boston Children's Hospital, involving new mouse models, shows the potential of a gene therapy approach in preventing and reversing cardiac dysfunction in Barth syndrome. (2020-03-09)

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