Current Ibuprofen News and Events

Current Ibuprofen News and Events, Ibuprofen News Articles.
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ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

Plants on aspirin
For centuries humans were using willow barks to treat a headache or an inflamed tooth. Later, the active ingredient, the plant hormone salicylic acid, was used to develop painkillers like Aspirin. But what happens, if plants are treated with these painkillers? By doing so, Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered an unexpected bioactivity of human pharmaceuticals in plants. The scientists published their study in the journal Cell Reports. (2020-12-01)

Nature as a model: Researchers develop novel anti-inflammatory substance
Anti-inflammatory substances based on components of human cells could one day improve treatment in patients. Researchers at the Institute of Pharmacy at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a method for producing those substances with controlled quality. Since the body does not recognise them as foreign substances, they offer advantages over anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen or diclofenac. The results were published in the ''European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences''. (2020-09-09)

NSAIDs not associated with more severe coronavirus disease, study finds
The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and diclofenac, is not associated with any adverse effects in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a new study published September 8 in PLOS Medicine by Anton Potteg├ąrd of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues from Aarhus University Hospital and the Danish Medicines Agency. (2020-09-08)

Thyroid inflammation linked to anxiety disorders
Patients with autoimmune inflammation of their thyroid may be at greater risk of developing anxiety, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that people with anxiety may also have inflammation in their thyroid gland that can be reduced by taking the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, ibuprofen. These findings suggest that thyroid function may play an important role in the development of anxiety disorders. (2020-09-06)

The case of ibuprofen: evidence of huge impact of COVID-19 misinformation when coming from credible sources
Researchers analysed the digital life of fake news about the adverse effects of ibuprofen in coronavirus patients, driven by a tweet posted by a French minister (2020-09-04)

Study finds increase in number, severity of suicide-related calls to US Poison Control
Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed the 549,807 calls made to Poison Control Centers (PCCs) in the U.S. for suicide-related cases involving OTC analgesics from 2000 through 2018 and found that both the overall number and rate of these cases increased significantly by 57% and 34%, respectively, during this period. (2020-07-27)

NSAIDs increase cardiovascular, bleeding risk in Korean heart attack patients
Use of NSAIDs to treat first-time heart attack patients significantly increased the risk for cardiovascular and bleeding events post-heart attack in a nationwide Korean study, published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-07-27)

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children
Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures. However, a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care shows ibuprofen is an effective medication for fracture pain in children and its use does not affect fracture healing. (2020-07-22)

Differential scanning calorimetry to quantify protein-ligand binding
A team of researchers from Kazan Federal University, Russia, led by Dr. Igor Sedov, reported an application of capillary differential scanning calorimetry technique for the study of the binding of albumin, a plasma transport protein, with different drug ligands. (2020-07-11)

Scientists propose strategy for site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems
Prof. QU Xiaogang from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues recently presented a novel strategy using a neutrophil-directed ATH reaction to achieve site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems. (2020-06-26)

New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health
Swansea University researchers have developed a new way to quickly find and remove wastewater pollutants, which can reduce their impact on the environment. (2020-06-24)

Study helps to identify medications which are safe to use in treatment of COVID-19
A recent study has found that there is no evidence for or against the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen for patients with COVID-19. (2020-03-30)

Study shows legal marijuana products too strong for pain relief
More than 90% of the legal marijuana products offered in medical dispensaries are much stronger than what clinical studies have shown that doctors recommend for chronic pain relief, according to a study published in the March 26 online edition of the journal PLOS ONE. (2020-03-26)

More research on addiction potential needed for use of opioids to treat children's pain
A pair of new studies led by University of Alberta pediatricians indicate that parents are more reluctant to have opioids prescribed for their children than doctors are to prescribe them. (2020-03-25)

Popular painkiller ibuprofen affects liver enzymes in mice
The popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought, according to new research from UC Davis. The study in laboratory mice also shows marked differences between males and females. (2020-03-11)

Study: Patients commonly prescribed opioids and antibiotics for dental conditions at EDs
A study in the March issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that antibiotics and opioids are frequently prescribed during emergency department visits for dental conditions, further emphasizing the need for continued efforts to combat both opioid abuse and overuse of antibiotics. (2020-02-24)

Does tramadol increase hip fracture risk?
An analysis published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research reveals that use of the pain medication tramadol was linked with a higher risk of hip fractures compared with the use of other pain medications in an analysis of a patient database from the United Kingdom. (2020-02-05)

Choosing common pain relievers: It's complicated
About 29 million Americans use over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain. Every year in the US, NSAID use is attributed to approximately 100,000 hospitalizations and 17,000 deaths. All of these drugs have benefits and risks, but deciding which one to use is complicated for health care providers and their patients. To assist in clinical decision-making, researchers address cardiovascular risks and beyond, which include gastrointestinal and kidney side effects of pain relievers. (2020-02-05)

More than half of dental prescriptions for opioids exceed pain-management guidelines
A new study suggests that roughly half of the opioid prescriptions written by dentists in the United States exceed the 3-day supply recommended by federal dental pain-management guidelines. (2020-02-04)

First US study shows strong results for procedure to treat knee pain from OA
Ari Isaacson, M.D., director of clinical research in the UNC School of Medicine's department of radiology, led a pilot study to investigate the effectiveness of using genicular artery embolization for long-term treatment of knee pain caused by osteoarthritis. (2019-12-17)

Mayo Clinic researchers present findings at the 2019 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium
Mayo Clinic researchers will present findings at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Dec. 10-14 in San Antonio. (2019-12-13)

New spray gel could help take the bite out of frostbite
Mountaineers and winter sports enthusiasts know the dangers of frostbite -- the tissue damage that can occur when extremities, such as the nose, ears, fingers and toes, are exposed to very cold temperatures. However, it can be difficult to get treated quickly in remote, snowbound areas. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a convenient gel that could be sprayed onto frostbite injuries when they occur, helping wounds heal. (2019-12-11)

Cannabis reduces headache and migraine pain by nearly half
Inhaled cannabis reduces self-reported headache severity by 47.3% and migraine severity by 49.6%, according to a recent study by Washington State University researchers published in the Journal of Pain. The study also found no evidence that cannabis caused 'overuse headache,' a pitfall of more conventional treatments. The researchers did see patients using larger doses of cannabis over time, indicating they may be developing tolerance to the drug. (2019-11-25)

VA investigates impact of opioids, sedatives on veterans
Nearly 20 veterans kill themselves each day in the United States, a statistic that has led the Department of Veterans Affairs to make suicide prevention its highest priority and to recognize the risks from the simultaneous use of opioids and benzodiazepines. To tackle the issue, the VA asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to develop protocols for a study that would use existing records to evaluate the best approaches to opioid treatment in veterans taking benzodiazepines. (2019-11-06)

33% of people on anticoagulants take OTC supplements with potentially serious interactions
Nearly 98% percent of people prescribed direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as apixaban used over-the-counter products. Of those, 33% took at least one such product that, in combination with the anticoagulants, could cause dangerous internal bleeding. People on these medications largely lacked knowledge of some potentially serious interactions. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants are the drug of choice for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, which occurs most frequently in older patients. (2019-10-28)

Antibiotics not necessary for most toothaches, according to new ADA guideline
The American Dental Association (ADA) announced today a new guideline indicating that in most cases, antibiotics are not recommended for toothaches. This guidance, published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, aligns with the ADA's longstanding antibiotic stewardship efforts and its pledged commitment to the US government's Antimicrobial Resistance Challenge. (2019-10-25)

One-third of children having tonsillectomies benefitted from opioid-free surgery and recovery
Nearly one-third of children who had surgery to remove their tonsils did not need opioids to get adequate pain relief during and after surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-20)

Pain medication use by children after common surgeries
About 400 caregivers reported pain medication use by children after common surgeries such as hernia, elbow fracture, appendectomy or adenoid removal in this study. Most reported using acetaminophen or ibuprofen or both; 88 patients (22%) were prescribed an opioid at hospital discharge and most used less than prescribed. (2019-09-04)

Six in 10 children receive opioids after tonsillectomy
Sixty percent of privately insured children undergoing tonsil removal received opioids -- with average prescriptions lasting about six to 10 days -- a new study finds. (2019-08-08)

One in 75 new mothers go on to long-term opioid painkiller use; risk rises with size of Rx
Nearly half of American women having a baby in the last decade received a prescription for a powerful opioid painkiller as part of their birth experience, a new study shows. And one or two in every hundred were still filling opioid prescriptions a year later -- especially those who received birth-related opioid prescriptions before the birth, and those who received the largest initial doses. (2019-07-26)

Opioid use is reduced in patients treated with NSAIDS
Patients receiving a post-surgery prescription of ibuprofen with a rescue prescription of Percocet used less opioids than a group of similar patients who were prescribed just Percocet. The research was presented by a group from the New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York City today at the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting. (2019-07-11)

Could marijuana be an effective pain alternative to prescription medications?
A new study has shown how cannabis could be an effective treatment option for both pain relief and insomnia, for those looking to avoid prescription and over the counter pain and sleep medications -- including opioids. (2019-07-01)

More than half of patients in pain management study took no opioids after operations
Patients undergoing six operations said postoperative pain was manageable, according to Journal of the American College of Surgeons study findings. (2019-05-31)

Soaking up pharmaceuticals and personal care products from water
Medications excreted in the urine or dumped into the toilet can end up in the water supply, just like lotions or cosmetics that wash off the body and go down the sink or shower drain. Unfortunately, conventional wastewater treatment cannot completely remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an adsorbent membrane that they say could be used to purify water contaminated with PPCPs. (2019-05-08)

New study aims to understand opioid fill patterns in children
Improved understanding of current opioid prescription trends in children is needed to inform development of future pediatric pain management guidelines. (2019-04-27)

Pairing music with medication offers potential therapeutic strategy to manage pain
Researchers at University of Utah Health found pairing music with one of four pain medications offered a promising complementary strategy to treat pain. (2019-03-27)

Study: Life-saving antibiotic receives new use guidelines from researchers around world
An international panel of the foremost researchers on infectious disease and antimicrobials has formed new guidelines on the use of polymyxins, a class of antibiotics employed as a last resort to treat deadly, drug-resistant bacteria. (2019-03-08)

Drug interactions in ER's common but preventable, Rutgers study finds
In a recent Rutgers study, 38 percent of patients discharged from the emergency department had at least one drug interaction resulting from a newly prescribed medicine. The study, which was published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, identified the most common prescription drug combinations that may result in a negative interaction. (2019-02-26)

Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe
On National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, Vanderbilt study disputes that Celebrex has no more impact on valves than older drugs in its class. (2019-02-22)

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