Current Iceberg News and Events

Current Iceberg News and Events, Iceberg News Articles.
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The melting of large icebergs is a key stage in the evolution of ice ages
A new study, in which the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (IACT) (CSIC-UGR) participated, has described for the first time a key stage in the beginning of the great glaciations and indicates that it can happen to our planet in the future. The findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature The study claims to have found a new connection that could explain the beginning of the ice ages on Earth (2021-02-19)

How icebergs really melt -- and what this could mean for climate change
Iceberg melt is responsible for about half the fresh water entering the ocean from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Accurately modelling how it enters is important for understanding potential impact on ocean circulation. (2021-02-16)

Swirlonic super particles baffle physicists
We report a novel state of active matter--a swirlonic state. It is comprised of swirlons, formed by groups of active particles orbiting their common center of mass. (2021-02-11)

'Farfarout'! Solar system's most distant planetoid confirmed
Astronomers have confirmed a planetoid that is almost four times farther from the Sun than Pluto, making it the most distant object ever observed in our solar system. (2021-02-10)

Severe undercounting of COVID-19 cases in U.S., other countries estimated via model
A new machine-learning framework uses reported test results and death rates to calculate estimates of the actual number of current COVID-19 infections within all 50 U.S. states and 50 countries. Jungsik Noh and Gaudenz Danuser of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on February 8, 2021. (2021-02-08)

Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth. (2021-01-13)

More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a University of Alberta study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected. (2020-11-30)

Breaking the ice on melting and freezing
At the 73rd Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics, researchers shared new insights into melting icebergs and lake ice formation. (2020-11-22)

How does the brain process fear?
CSHL Professor Bo Li's team explores the brain circuits that underlie fear. The researchers have mapped critical connections and teased out how specific components contribute to learning fear. They found a previously unknown link between fear learning and a movement control system. This research could lead to better treatments for people suffering from anxiety disorders. (2020-11-05)

Star clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
Star clusters have been part of the Imaginarium of human civilization for millennia. The brightest star clusters to Earth, like the Pleiades, are readily visible to the naked eye. A team around astronomer Stefan Meingast at the University of Vienna has now revealed the existence of massive stellar halos, termed coronae, surrounding local star clusters. The paper was published in ''Astronomy & Astrophysics''. (2020-10-15)

Layer of strength, layer of functionality for biomedical fibers
Wound dressing, tissue scaffolding, controlled and sustained drug delivery, and cardiac patching are all biomedical processes requiring a material that combines strength with functionality. Core-sheath polymer fibers, fibers comprised of a strong core surrounded by a biologically applicable sheath layer, are an affordable way to meet these requirements. In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, researchers discuss methods of producing core-sheath polymer fibers and their promising applications. (2020-10-13)

Increase in alcohol-industry funded research is a cause for concern, study suggests
A study by the University of York has found that since 2009, there has been a 56% increase in research funded by alcohol companies or affiliated organisations - with some studies making claims about the health benefits of alcohol. (2020-09-16)

Overlooked 'housekeeping' gene plays unexpected role in seizures
Molecules known as tRNAs are often overlooked in studies of disease processes. UC San Diego researchers have found that a mutation in a tRNA gene called n-Tr20--expressed only in the brain--can disrupt the landscape of entire cells, leading to chain reactions that alter brain function and behavior. The results are published in the journal Neuron. (2020-08-26)

Overconsumption and growth economy key drivers of environmental crises
If we want to mitigate and solve the many global environmental issues the world is facing, we can't rely on technology alone, scientists have warned. (2020-06-19)

The wildlife trade encompasses all major branches of the biological tree of life
The wildlife trade is a multibillion-dollar industry that threatens biodiversity. Exploiting wildlife by selling it, their parts or their products is one of the most profitable activities in the world. A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki spotlights the significance of all major taxonomic groups in the global wildlife trade and calls for action to fill in our gaps in knowledge. The group also lists nine actions anyone can take to fight the illegal wildlife trade. (2020-05-26)

The four horsemen of the COVID-19 pandemic
It is clear that we must prioritize identifying and alleviating the conditions that made the Covid-19 pandemic possible. Even as it rages, scientists are already asking if it is more than just a virus, but rather a symptom emerging from something much deeper, a nonlinear dynamical system of coupled pathologies underlying a veneer of 'progress' in an increasingly fragile, volatile, hyperconnected world. (2020-04-06)

Researchers: Synthetic chemicals in soils are 'ticking time bomb'
Synthetic chemicals that were released into the environment for the first time 80 years ago have been linked to harmful health effects, and more of them are migrating slowly from the soil, according to University of Arizona research. (2020-02-11)

Significant safety issues for kids on long term ventilation at home
There are significant safety issues for children who receive long term mechanical assistance with breathing at home (ventilation), finds an analysis of officially reported safety incidents associated with provision, and published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-12-17)

Research calls for new measures to treat mental illness and opioid use
Opioid use among psychiatric hospital patients needs to be addressed through an integrated approach to managing mental illness, pain and substance use, a study by researchers at the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-12-13)

New research seeks to improve safety equipment for pregnant women
As technology advances in the things we use every day, it's generally accepted they also become safer. But according to one UBC engineer, that may not be true for a large portion of the population. New research from UBC's Okanagan campus has developed a innovative model to map the impact of trauma on a pregnant woman and her uterus if she were involved in an accident--with the hopes of making everything from airbags to seatbelts safer for all. (2019-12-11)

Southern Arizona once looked like Tibet
The study determined that the Earth's crust in southern Arizona was once almost 60 kilometers thick, which is twice as thick as it is today -- and comparable to how thick the crust is in parts of the Himalayas. (2019-12-03)

Using fungi to search for medical drugs
An enormous library of products derived from more than 10,000 fungi could help us find new drugs. Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute, Westerdijk Institute and Utrecht University have set up this library and screened it for biologically active compounds. The researchers identified various known compounds, among which the cholesterol lowering drug lovastatin. The results of this research were published on the Nov. 26 in the scientific journal Scientific Reports. (2019-11-26)

Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. An international research team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has investigated ice samples worldwide. A key result is that only a small part of the glacier ice contaminated with sediment contains large amounts of iron, while the vast majority of clean ice contains very little iron. The study was published today in the international journal Nature Communications. (2019-11-20)

Cell signalling breakthrough opens up new avenues for research
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have shown that the phenomenon of protein modification (phosphorylation) in cell signalling is far more diverse and complex than previously thought. (2019-11-04)

Astronomers discover 'monster' galaxy lurking in distant dust clouds
A team of astronomers including assistant professor Kate Whitaker at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports today that they have by chance discovered faint traces of a huge galaxy never seen before, dating from the early universe. The authors say the scientific community once regarded such monster galaxies as folklore because there was no evidence for them, until now. (2019-10-22)

Uncovering a new aspect of charge density modulations in high temperature superconductors
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and Politecnico di Milano have identified a crucial new aspect of charge density modulations in cuprate high critical temperature superconductors. They have identified a new electron wave which could help reveal some of the mysteries about superconducting materials. The findings are published in the journal Science. (2019-09-09)

Icebergs delay Southern Hemisphere future warming
Future warming can accelerate the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet. A large fraction of the ice will enter the Southern Ocean in form of icebergs, which melt and provide a cooling and freshening effect to the warmer and denser ocean water. This process will increase the formation of sea-ice and shift winds and ocean currents. The overall effect is a slowdown in the magnitude of human-induced Southern Hemispheric warming and sea-level rise. (2019-08-12)

TV crews capture first evidence of leopard seals sharing food
Previously unseen footage captured during filming for the Netflix series Our Planet -- narrated by Sir David Attenborough -- reports up to 36 seals seen feeding at the same king penguin colony in South Georgia. (2019-08-04)

Tidewater glaciers: Melting underwater far faster than previously estimated?
A tidewater glacier in Alaska is melting underwater at rates upwards of two orders of magnitude greater than what is currently estimated, sonar surveys reveal. (2019-07-25)

USF geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse
New radar technology allowed USF geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise. (2019-07-19)

Robot uses machine learning to harvest lettuce
A vegetable-picking robot that uses machine learning to identify and harvest a commonplace, but challenging, agricultural crop has been developed by engineers. (2019-07-07)

Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)

Wrong side surgical errors substantially underreported and totally preventable
Performing a procedure on the wrong side of a patient's body, although rare, may be more common than generally thought. More than 80 wrong side error (WSE) incidents were reported across 100 hospitals in Spain over the past decade, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3). (2019-05-31)

Patients harboring E. coli with highly resistant MCR-1 gene found In NYC hospital
A team of investigators has identified a cluster of four patients harboring Escherichia coli carrying a rare antibiotic resistance gene, mcr-1. That gene renders the microbe resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort against some multidrug-resistant infections. Three of those patients showed no symptoms, raising the risk of spread. (2019-04-08)

Large Antarctic Ice Shelf, home to a UK research station, is about to break apart
Glaciology experts have issued evidence that a large section of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station, is about break off. The iceberg, measuring over 1,500 square kilometres -- which is twice the size of New York City -- is expected to break away from the Brunt Ice Shelf within the next few months. (2019-04-05)

Breast milk as drug-delivery device
Treating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. Modified cells in the liquid could potentially deliver vaccines, fix birth defects or provide proteins that some babies can't make on their own. (2019-03-06)

Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery. (2019-03-04)

Cracks herald the calving of a large iceberg from Petermann Glacier
Cracks in the floating ice tongue of Petermann Glacier in the far northwest reaches of Greenland indicate the pending loss of another large iceberg. (2019-02-06)

Quirky glacial behavior explained
In August 2012, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. As the glacier flowed faster, it became thinner and more unstable and in a twist, a pileup of thick ice replenished the glacier's terminus, slowing it down again. New work explaining the fast-then-slow movement of Jakobshavn may help scientists better predict how tidewater glaciers contribute to sea level rise. (2018-11-29)

Gunshot wounds in children account for $270 million in emergency room and inpatient charges annually
A new Johns Hopkins study of more than 75,000 teenagers and children who suffered a firearm-related injury between 2006 and 2014 pinpoints the financial burden of gunshot wounds and highlights the increasing incidence of injury in certain age groups. (2018-10-29)

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