Current Image Processing News and Events

Current Image Processing News and Events, Image Processing News Articles.
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Machine learning method identifies precancerous colon polyps
A machine learning algorithm helps accurately differentiate benign and premalignant colorectal polyps on CT colonography scans, according to a new study. (2021-02-23)

Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

How the brain processes sign language
Over 70 million deaf people use sign languages as their preferred communication form. Although they access similar brain structures as spoken languages, it hasn't been identified the brain regions that process both forms of language equally. MPI CBS has now discovered that Broca's area in the left hemisphere, central for spoken languages, is also crucial for sign languages. This is where the grammar and meaning are processed, regardless of whether it is spoken or signed language. (2021-02-19)

Skoltech's recent achievement takes us one step closer to Mars
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables processing images from autonomous greenhouses, monitoring plant growth, and automating the cultivation process. In their article, they share the experience in the scope of controlled-environment agriculture automation in the Antarctic station greenhouse facility called EDEN ISS. (2021-02-17)

Scientists manipulate magnets at the atomic scale
Fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies are on the horizon after an international team of scientists successfully manipulated magnets at the atomic level. Physicist Dr Rostislav Mikhaylovskiy from Lancaster University said: ''With stalling efficiency trends of current technology, new scientific approaches are especially valuable. Our discovery of the atomically-driven ultrafast control of magnetism opens broad avenues for fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies essential to keep up with our data hunger.'' (2021-02-12)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

Discovering structural diverseness of neurons between brain areas and between cases
Dr. Masanari Itokawa who is the vice president of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and colleague by the collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8) and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory identified that the schizophrenia cases showed a thin and tortuous neuronal network compared with the controls (2021-02-10)

Object transparency reduces human perception of three-dimensional shapes
Toyohashi University of Technology discovered that when people judge the thickness of an object, objects with glass-like transparent optical properties are perceived to be flatter than they actually are. This discover may be useful for everyday applications, such as devices to assist with walking in people with low-vision or autonomous driving. (2021-02-10)

Choir singing can improve cognitive functioning among the elderly
Researchers have made new discoveries on the benefits of choir singing which may include positive effects on cognitive functioning similar to playing an instrument. (2021-02-10)

Experiment shows how our visual system avoids overloading
Russian researchers from HSE University have studied a hypothesis regarding the capability of the visual system to automatically categorize objects (i.e., without requiring attention span). The results of a simple and beautiful experiment confirmed this assumption. The paper was published in the journal Scientific Reports. The study was supported by a Russian Science Foundation grant. (2021-02-09)

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published in Scientific Reports, by Guillermo Jiménez-Pérez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza. (2021-02-09)

3D-printed spectrometer on a 100 x100 μm² footprint
The miniaturisation of spectroscopic measurement devices opens novel information channels in medical science or consumer electronics. Scientists of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, developed a 3D-printed miniature spectrometer with a volume of 100 × 100 × 300 μm³ and a spectral resolution of up to 10 nm in the visible range. This spectrometer can be manufactured directly onto camera sensors, and a parallel arrangement allows for quick (''snapshot'') and low profile, highly customizable hyperspectral cameras. (2021-02-08)

As you look around, mental images bounce between right and left brain
A new study in Neuron explains how the brain helps us remember what we've seen, even as it shifts around in our visual system. That ability--to remember that something is the same thing no matter how it's moving around relative to our eyes--is what gives us the freedom to control where we look. (2021-02-08)

At the core of the Integrator complex
A new paper from the Galej group at EMBL Grenoble describes the structure of key parts of the Integrator complex. This complex, which is composed of multiple protein subunits, is involved in global regulation of the process of transcription, during which the cell's DNA is used as a template to make instructions in the form of RNA. Knowing the structure of the Integrator complex will help scientists to better understand the interactions between its subunits and how it is involved in gene expression. (2021-02-05)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

RUDN University mathematicians reduced neural network size six times without post-training
A team of mathematicians from RUDN University found a way to reduce the size of a trained neural network six times without spending additional resources on re-training it. The approach is based on finding a correlation between the weights of neural connections in the initial system and its simplified version. (2021-02-05)

The benefits of reading outdoors
Investigators demonstrate that image luminance has opposite effects on the contrast sensitivity of cortical pathways signaling lights than darks. It impairs luminance discrimination for the brightest stimuli of the scene while improving it for the darkest stimuli, a mechanism that is needed to efficiently sample natural scenes. (2021-02-02)

Researchers create novel photonic chip
Researchers at the George Washington University and University of California, Los Angeles, have developed and demonstrated for the first time a photonic digital to analog converter without leaving the optical domain. Such novel converters can advance next-generation data processing hardware with high relevance for data centers, 6G networks, artificial intelligence and more. (2021-02-02)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography
In this article of EPJ Plus, researchers build on previous studies into detection technologies and reconstruction algorithms for muon tomography, to develop a full-scale muon tomograph prototype. (2021-02-01)

New study investigates photonics for artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing
Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the next steps to develop fast, energy-efficient, future computing systems that use light instead of electrons to process and store information - incorporating hardware inspired directly by the functioning of the human brain. (2021-01-29)

"Liquid" machine-learning system adapts to changing conditions
MIT researchers developed a neural network that learns on the job, not just during training. The ''liquid'' network varies its equations' parameters, enhancing its ability to analyze time series data. The advance could boost autonomous driving, medical diagnosis, and more. (2021-01-28)

Improvements to holographic displays poised to enhance virtual and augmented reality
Researchers have developed a new approach that improves the image quality and contrast for holographic displays. The new technology could help improve near-eye displays used for virtual and augmented reality applications. (2021-01-28)

A little soap simplifies making 2D nanoflakes
The right combination of surfactant, water and processing can maximize the quality of 2D hexagonal boron nitride for such products as antibacterial films. (2021-01-27)

Smart algorithm cleans up images by searching for clues buried in noise
In a new study published in Nature Machine Intelligence, researchers at Texas A&M University have unveiled a machine learning-based algorithm that can reduce graininess in low-resolution images and reveal new details that were otherwise buried within the noise. (2021-01-26)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

SUTD research team extends 4D printing to nanophotonics
The newly developed shape memory polymer resist which allows for high-resolution 4D printing, promises a platform for information hiding for optical anti-counterfeiting and tunable photonic devices. (2021-01-22)

A method for calculating optimal parameters of liquid chrystal displays developed at RUDN University
A professor from RUDN University together with his colleagues from Saratov Chernyshevsky State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia developed a method for calculating the parameters of diffraction optical elements used in LCDs. In particular, the new technology can be used to expand the angle of view while preserving high resolution and color rendition. (2021-01-22)

Smooth touchdown: novel camera-based system for automated landing of drone on a fixed spot
While autonomous drones can greatly assist with difficult rescue missions, they require a safe landing procedure. In a new study, scientists from Shibaura Institute of Technology (SIT), Japan, have demonstrated automated drone landing with a simple 2D camera guiding the drone to a symbolized landing pad. The guiding camera can be further improved to include depth-related information, paving the way for novel applications in indoor transportation and inspection. (2021-01-21)

A display that completely blocks off counterfeits
POSTECH research team led by Professor Junsuk Rho develops nanostructures capable of polarized optical encryption. (2021-01-21)

Tiny high-tech probes reveal how information flows across the brain
A new study from researchers at the Allen Institute collected and analyzed the largest single dataset of neurons' electrical activity to glean principles of how we perceive the visual world around us. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, captures the hundreds of split-second electrical signals that fire when an animal is interpreting what it sees. (2021-01-20)

Merging technologies with color to avoid design failures
Various software packages can be used to evaluate products and predict failure; however, these packages are extremely computationally intensive and take a significant amount of time to produce a solution. Quicker solutions mean less accurate results. (2021-01-20)

Story tips: Volcanic microbes, unbreakable bonds and flood mapping
ORNL story tips: Volcanic microbes, unbreakable bonds and flood mapping (2021-01-19)

NASA explores solar wind with new view of small sun structures
Scientists have combined NASA data and cutting-edge image processing to gain new insight into the solar structures that create the Sun's flow of high-speed solar wind, detailed in new research published today in The Astrophysical Journal. This first look at relatively small features, dubbed ''plumelets,'' could help scientists understand how and why disturbances form in the solar wind. (2021-01-19)

The brain region responsible for self-bias in memory
A brain region involved in processing information about ourselves biases our ability to remember, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-18)

A highly sensitive technique for measuring the state of a cytoskeleton
Researchers have developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was typically made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure the cytoskeleton organization. The researchers expect it to dramatically improve our understanding of various cellular phenomena related to cytoskeletal bundling. (2021-01-14)

Dual-shot dynamics and ultimate frequency of all-optical magnetic recording on GdFeCo
Achieving ultrafast and energy-efficient optical control of magnetism beyond light's 'diffraction limit' could revolutionize information-processing technology. Towards this goal, researchers led by Xiangping Li at Jinan University and Alexey V. Kimel at Radboud University have determined the fastest possible rate of the optical reversal of magnetization of up to 3?GHz, and proposed a method to achieve data recording at scales below light's 'diffraction limit', which is generally believed to restrict the attainable resolution. (2021-01-14)

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results confirmed the theory that positive emotions are mainly processed in the left half of the brain. (2021-01-13)

Diffractive networks light the way for optical image classification
There is renewed interest in optical computing due to its potential advantages, including parallelization, power-efficiency, and computation speed. Diffractive networks utilize deep learning-based design of successive diffractive layers to all-optically process information as the light is transmitted from the input to the output plane. UCLA researchers significantly improved the statistical inference performance of diffractive optical networks using feature engineering and ensemble learning, which is important for applications including all-optical object classification and computational imaging. (2021-01-13)

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of new developments in the Arctic ice, and this tool provides a faster solution. (2021-01-12)

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