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Current Image Processing News and Events, Image Processing News Articles.
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Using light to revolutionize artificial intelligence
An international team of researchers, including Professor Roberto Morandotti of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), just introduced a new photonic processor that could revolutionize artificial intelligence, as reported by the prestigious journal Nature. (2021-01-11)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material. (2021-01-08)

Light-carrying chips advance machine learning
An international team of researchers found that so-called photonic processors, with which data is processed by means of light, can process information very much more rapidly and in parallel than electronic chips. The results have been published in the scientific journal ''Nature''. (2021-01-06)

Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing
An international team of scientists have developed a photonic processor that uses rays of light inside silicon chips to process information much faster than conventional electronic chips. Published in Nature, the breakthrough study was carried out by scientists from EPFL, the Universities of Oxford, M√ľnster, Exeter, Pittsburgh, and IBM Research - Zurich. (2021-01-06)

Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor
A Swinburne-led team has demonstrated the world's fastest and most powerful optical neuromorphic processor for artificial intelligence. The neuromorphic processor operates faster than 10 trillion operations per second and is capable of processing ultra-large scale data. (2021-01-06)

See live cells with 7 times greater sensitivity using new microscopy technique
Experts in optical physics have developed a new way to see inside living cells in greater detail using existing microscopy technology and without needing to add stains or fluorescent dyes. (2020-12-31)

Scientists explore deficits in processing speed in individuals with spinal cord injury
This study is the first to examine the neural mechanisms of higher order cognitive tasks of individuals with SCI.''Our ability to observe brain activation while the individual performs specific cognitive tasks provides new information on the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive deficits that we now know affect a substantial proportion of the SCI population,'' Dr. Wylie said. ''Developing treatments targeted to these deficits depends on our pursuit of this line of research, which may benefit other populations affected by delayed processing speed.'' (2020-12-30)

DUAL takes AI to the next level
Scientists at DGIST in Korea, and UC Irvine and UC San Diego in the US, have developed a computer architecture that processes unsupervised machine learning algorithms faster, while consuming significantly less energy than state-of-the-art graphics processing units. The key is processing data where it is stored in computer memory and in an all-digital format. The researchers presented the new architecture, called DUAL, at the 2020 53rd Annual IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Microarchitecture. (2020-12-30)

Quick look under the skin
Imaging techniques enable a detailed look inside an organism. But interpreting the data is time-consuming and requires a great deal of experience. Artificial neural networks open up new possibilities: They require just seconds to interpret whole-body scans of mice and to segment and depict the organs in colors, instead of in various shades of gray. This facilitates the analysis considerably. (2020-12-28)

Frozen: Cutting-edge technology reveals structures within cells
Temperatures of minus 196 degrees Celsius enable high-resolution imaging of the cell's interior. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria are thus able to show for the first time how the active form of a protein complex plays critical roles in cell motility and other important biological functions look like. This study is published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-22)

Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light. (2020-12-22)

A powerful computational tool for efficient analysis of cell division 4D image data
A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel computational tool that can reconstruct and visualise three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells, speeding up the analysing process from hundreds of hours by hand to a few hours by the computer. Revolutionising the way biologists analyse image data, this tool can advance further studies in developmental and cell biology, such as the growth of cancer cells. (2020-12-22)

Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The combination may improve emotional regulation in people with psychiatric disorders. (2020-12-21)

New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks. (2020-12-21)

Developing smarter, faster machine intelligence with light
Researchers at the George Washington University, together with researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the deep-tech venture startup Optelligence LLC, have developed an optical convolutional neural network accelerator capable of processing large amounts of information, on the order of petabytes, per second. (2020-12-18)

How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using?Cold?War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.? (2020-12-17)

A new means of neuronal communication discovered in the human brain
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions. (2020-12-17)

NIH researchers discover brain area crucial for recognizing visual events
Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) report that a brain region in the superior temporal sulcus (fSTS) is crucial for processing and making decisions about visual information. (2020-12-17)

AI-powered microscope could check cancer margins in minutes
Researchers from Rice University and MD Anderson Cancer Center have created a microscope that uses artificial intelligence to quickly and inexpensively image large tissue sections at high resolution with minimal preparation. If clinically validated, the DeepDOF microscope could allow surgeons to inspect tumor margins within minutes. (2020-12-17)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

Accurate neural network computer vision without the 'black box'
New research by a team at Duke University offers clues to what goes on inside the minds of machines as they learn to see. Instead of attempting to account for a neural network's decision-making on a post hoc basis, their method shows how the network learns along the way, by revealing how much the network calls to mind different concepts to help decipher what it sees as the image travels through successive layers. (2020-12-15)

Artificial intelligence sets sights on the sun
Scientists employed a neural network to learn the characteristics of high-quality images of the ground-based full-disk images of the sun and estimate the deviation of real observations from an ideal reference. They used artificial intelligence (AI) to achieve quality assessment that is similar to human interpretation. Currently, the authors are further elaborating their image processing methods to provide a continuous data stream of the highest possible quality and developing automated detection software for continuous tracking of solar activity. (2020-12-14)

New computational method validates images without 'ground truth'
Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering have developed a computational method that allows them to determine not if an entire imaging picture is accurate, but if any given point on the image is probable, based on the assumptions built into the model. (2020-12-11)

Sounds, smells could sway our self-image
A lemony scent and light sounds could change the way you feel about yourself. Previously, researchers have shown that visual and tactile stimulation can change a person's perception of their own body weight. Research being presented by Giada Brianza at the 179th ASA Meeting, has found our hearing and sense of smell can also change how we feel about our self-image, which could help improve healthy behaviors. (2020-12-11)

Visual short-term memory is more complex than previously assumed
Contrary to previous assumptions, visual short-term memory is not merely based on one kind of information about an object, such as only its colour or only its name. Rather, several types of information can be retained simultaneously in short-term memory. Using complex EEG analyses and deep neural networks, researchers at Beijing Normal University and Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered that short-term memory is more complex than previously assumed. (2020-12-08)

Breakthrough optical sensor mimics human eye, a key step toward better AI
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers at Oregon State University are making key advances with a new type of optical sensor that more closely mimics the human eye's ability to perceive changes in its visual field. (2020-12-08)

Grasping an object - model describes complete movement planning in the brain
Neurobiologists at the German Primate Center developed a model that for the first time can completely represent the neuronal processes from seeing to grasping an object. (2020-12-07)

Problems with depth perception caused by too many cells
The connections that integrate information from the left and right eyes are set up early in development, but visual experiences are important for fine-tuning the circuits. Without pruning the proper cells, an adult may lack full use of their visual system. (2020-12-07)

Astrocytes improve decision-making
A study led by researchers from the Cajal Institute of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) has demonstrated the relevance of the astrocytes (a cell type present in the Nervous System) in the decision-making process. Data published in Nature Neuroscience journal, indicate that these glial cells favor those decisions with higher etiological value for individuals. (2020-12-07)

How do we separate the factual from the possible? New research shows how our brain responds to both
Our brains respond to language expressing facts differently than they do to words conveying possibility, a team of neuroscientists has found. Its work offers new insights into the impact word choice has on how we make distinctions between what's real vs. what's merely possible. (2020-12-07)

Inouye Solar Telescope releases first image of a sunspot
The US NSF's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope just released its first image of a sunspot. The telescope's four-meter primary mirror will give the best views of the sun from Earth throughout the next solar cycle. This image is an indication of the telescope's advanced optics. The image is released along with the first of a series of Inouye-related articles featured in the Solar Physics journal. (2020-12-04)

The same vision for all primates
Primates process visual information similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in their visual cortex. Scientists of the University of Geneva have investigated whether these computational units scale across the large differences in size between primates. The gray mouse lemur is one of the smallest of them and his visual processing units reveals that all primates, independent of their body size, have an equivalent computational units. (2020-12-03)

Scientists invent a new type of microscope that can see through an intact skull
Researchers at IBS invented a new type of microscope called reflective matrix microscope, which uses adaptive optics techniques (2020-12-02)

Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
Looking at a group of bacteria from soil, researchers at Northwestern University discovered that these organisms overcome limitation in their carbon processing machinery by rerouting their metabolic pathways to favor producing iron-scavenging compounds. (2020-11-30)

Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
New research at the Brothers submarine arc volcano sheds light on the complexity of microbial composition on the seafloor and provides insights into how past and the present subsurface process could be imprinted in microbial diversity. (2020-11-30)

Men tuning into Insta-spiration
New research confirms men are affected by Instagram influencers who set global benchmarks for ideal body shape, fashion and even facial trends. While perhaps not as focused on 'thinness' as women appear to be from female influencers, the Flinders University study confirms males are responding to the body image and fitness messages shared by Instagram leaders, some with millions of followers. (2020-11-29)

Neuromorphic computing with memristors
In a paper published in NANO, researchers study the role of memristors in neuromorphic computing. This novel fundamental electronic component supports the cloning of bio-neural system with low cost and power. (2020-11-27)

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste
Scientists from NUST MISIS have improved the technology of 3D printing from aluminum, having achieved an increase in the hardness of products by 1,5 times. The nanocarbon additive to aluminum powder, which they have developed, obtained from the products of processing associated petroleum gas, will improve the quality of 3D printed aerospace composites. The research results are published in the international scientific journal Composites Communications (2020-11-25)

Brain waves guide us in spotlighting surprises
A new study by MIT and Boston University neuroscientists finds that the dynamic interplay of different brain wave frequencies, rather than dedicated circuitry, appears to govern the brain's knack for highlighting what's surprising and downplaying what's predictable. (2020-11-24)

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