Current Immigrants News and Events

Current Immigrants News and Events, Immigrants News Articles.
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Experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) linked to nutritional health
A study of factors associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has led to a number of novel findings linking nutrition to experiences of PTSD. Notable among them is the discovery that Canadians, between the ages of 45 and 85, were less likely to exhibit PTSD if they consumed an average of two to three fiber sources daily. (2021-02-03)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

Perception of palliative care in South Asian populations
The results showed that seventy per cent of participants in the study had a lack of understanding of palliative care and forty-four per cent thought that palliative care went against their values and beliefs. (2021-01-07)

Non-immigrant kids respond differently when immigrant children are bullied
A recent study finds that, while youth think all bullying is bad, non-immigrant adolescents object less to bullying when the victim is an immigrant. However, the study found that the more contact immigrant and non-immigrant children had with each other, the more strongly they objected to bullying. (2021-01-05)

Structural racism severely impacts the health of foreign-born Blacks and Latinx
Structural racism can lead to discrimination in many aspects of life including criminal justice, employment, housing, health care, political power, and education. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examines the impact of structural racism on health and confirms that chronic exposure to stressors leads to a marked erosion of health that is particularly severe among foreign-born Blacks and Latinx. Investigators say largescale structural policies that address structural racism are needed. (2020-12-15)

Undocumented immigrants far less likely to commit crimes in U.S. than citizens
Crime rates among undocumented immigrants are just a fraction of those of their U.S.-born neighbors, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis of Texas arrest and conviction records. (2020-12-07)

Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third graders
More frequent exposure to air pollution spikes were associated with reduced test scores for third graders in Salt Lake County. Schools with a higher proportion of students of color and from households experiencing poverty were exposed to more peak pollution days than were schools serving middle- to upper- class and predominately white students. The results stress the need for legislators to enact policies to reduce the number of peak pollution days. (2020-11-30)

One in four older refugees are in psychological distress -- even decades after resettlement
A new study of Canadians aged 45-85, released this week in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry, found that 24% of refugees were in psychological distress compared to 13% of non-refugee immigrants and those born in Canada. (2020-11-19)

U.S.-born Black women at higher risk of preeclampsia than Black immigrants
Black women born in the United States have a higher risk of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy, a condition known as preeclampsia, compared to Black women who immigrated to the country. In this study of Black women in Boston, those who were not born in the U.S. had a 27% lower risk of preeclampsia, compared to Black women born in America. The risk increased for Black immigrants after they lived in the U.S. for more than 10 years. (2020-11-09)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently
Researchers have linked a brain region to what they call neural polarization, offering a glimpse into the partisan brain in the weeks leading up to what is arguably the most consequential U.S. presidential election in modern history. (2020-10-20)

Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Stanford researcher David Hausman analyzed ICE deportations data for 296 large counties combined with FBI crime data. Sanctuary counties experienced a significant decrease in deportations in the months after sanctuary policies were adopted. Deportations of individuals with violent convictions did not decrease, but deportation of individuals without convictions decreased by about half. Sanctuary policies did not have a significant effect on crime rates or the rate at which police arrested individuals for reported crimes. (2020-10-19)

UB study finds no apparent link between undocumented immigration and crime
An analysis by a University at Buffalo-led team using two estimates of undocumented immigration suggests that, on average, this population reduced or had no effect on crime in 154 U.S. metropolitan areas studied, including places such as New York City, Chicago and Las Vegas. (2020-10-05)

How Hispanic and Asian populations influence US food culture
A new study found strong evidence that Asian and Hispanic populations are important contributors to local food culture. Those populations predict the number of Hispanic and Asian local ethnic restaurants - but not chains - in a given county. The size of local Hispanic and Asian populations also is linked to non-ethnic ownership of ethnic restaurants, and the availability of local Asian and Hispanic cuisine is strongly associated with education levels of the white majority population. (2020-10-05)

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (2020-09-22)

Risk of death may increase for successive generations of immigrants with type 2 diabetes
A 10-year nationwide study investigating survival rates in all people with type 2 diabetes in Sweden, to be published in Diabetologia, finds that non-Western immigrants experienced a higher risk of death with each generation born in the country. The findings arebeing presented at Annual Meeting of The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). (2020-09-22)

Trump must contend with a mobilized religious left, new research finds
With the 2020 presidential election on the near horizon, Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein discusses what he and his co-researcher learned about the political engagement of U.S. congregations -- and how that may impact results on Nov. 3. (2020-09-17)

The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes by providing outreach education, access to primary health care, and referrals to legal and social services.' (2020-09-15)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

Why do so many refugees move after arrival? Opportunity and community
Many refugees in the United States move to a different state soon after arrival, according to a new dataset on nearly 450,000 people who were resettled between 2000 and 2014. And when they move, they are primarily looking for better job markets and helpful social networks of others from their home country -- not more generous welfare benefits. These findings counter the stereotype that refugees are destined to become a drain on state resources over the long run. (2020-08-07)

Increase in immigration has little impact on the wages of US citizens
A new study in Review of Economic Studies suggests that a large increase in the stock of immigrants to the United States would have little impact on the wages of native US citizens. Allowing for more high-skill immigration could be detrimental to some highly skilled workers in the country, but disproportionately beneficial to low skilled workers. (2020-08-05)

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical 'othering' of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities. (2020-07-29)

Work absences in April highest on record, suggesting under-count of COVID cases: New study
In April, more than 2 million jobholders were out sick from work, the highest number since at least 1976, and more than double the rate from mid-April 2019, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The surge in absences was largest for immigrant workers, whose absence rate rose almost five-fold from 12 months earlier, when their absenteeism rate had been 37% lower than that of U.S.- born jobholders. (2020-07-27)

New study finds access to food stamps reduces visits to the physicians
In a new study, University of Colorado Denver researchers found when people have access to the food stamp program, they are less likely to frequent a physician for medical care. About 44 percent of food stamp recipients in the United States also receive health insurance coverage through the Medicaid program. Since there is a reduction in the need for medical treatment, government health care spending is reduced, and there's an increase in savings for the individuals who pay out of pocket. (2020-07-22)

Anti-Asian hate crime during the COVID-19 pandemic
Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, the United States has seen a surge of Asian Americans reporting racially motivated hate crimes. Earlier this month, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs professor Angela Gover, PhD, along with researchers from Iowa State University and RTI International, published a research paper outlining how COVID-19 has enabled the spread of racism and created national insecurity, fear of foreigners, and general xenophobia. (2020-07-21)

Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. Most of them will not be able to return to their homes in the foreseeable future. Psychologists at Münster University have developed a model of the psychological factors affecting the successful integration of refugees. The model has been published in the journal ''Perspectives on Psychological Science''. (2020-07-09)

Mobile clinics can help address health care needs of Latino farmworkers
A University of California, Riverside, study that sought to determine barriers to health care among Spanish-speaking Latino farmworkers in rural communities has devised an innovative health care service delivery model that addresses many challenges these communities face: mobile health clinics that bring health care services to patients in their community spaces. (2020-07-02)

Nutrition a key ingredient for cognitive health of midlife and older Canadians
A new study, investigating factors associated with verbal fluency among a large sample of anglophone Canadians aged 45-85, found that individuals who consumed more vegetables and fruits and more nuts and pulses (such as lentils and beans) scored higher on tests of verbal fluency. (2020-06-24)

COVID-19: Impact on environmental justice
COVID-19 is like a heat-seeking missile that targets the most vulnerable. The bull's-eye is environmental justice communities, which are the poorest, the most polluted, and the sickest when it comes to comorbidities. (2020-06-16)

Mexican immigrant obesity rates climb with deportation fears
Mexican immigrants, especially those who are undocumented and fear deportation, have limited access to healthy foods and are at increased risk for obesity because of stress, anxiety and depression, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-06-09)

Discrimination may erase 'birthweight advantage' of black US immigrants in one generation
Black women have the highest prevalence of low birthweight babies, but black immigrants typically have much better outcomes than their US-born counterparts. However, this study finds the 'birthweight advantage' experienced by the foreign-born black population is lost within a single generation. The researchers point to discrimination and inequality as causes. (2020-06-03)

New Visa restrictions will make the US economic downturn worse
Research on visa restrictions designed to help American graduates seeking jobs during the pandemic-fueled economic downturn are likely to further hurt the economy, according to new UC San Diego research on immigrant rights. (2020-06-03)

Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. The findings by two University of Oregon researchers were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020-04-22)

Can migration, workforce participation, and education balance the cost of aging in Europe?
New IIASA research shows that higher levels of education and increasing workforce participation in both migrant and local populations are needed to compensate for the negative economic impacts of aging populations in EU countries. (2020-03-23)

Majority in national survey against separating immigrant families at US/Mexico Border
A clear majority of participants in a national survey about the zero-tolerance policy on the United States/Mexico border strongly opposed separating immigrant families and charging the parents as criminals, according to Baylor University research. (2020-03-16)

Noncitizens are undertreated for heart attack, stroke risk factors
A new study published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, shows that noncitizens in the United States are less likely to receive treatment for cardiovascular disease risk factors when compared with born or naturalized US citizens. (2020-03-10)

Examining risk of violent assault among young immigrants, refugees in Canada
This population-based study describes the risk of experiencing violent assault among young immigrants and refugees (ages 10 to 24) compared with nonimmigrants in an analysis of  linked health and administrative databases in Ontario, Canada. Researchers acknowledge some important factors are unknown, including the circumstances of some events. (2020-03-04)

Low fruit and vegetable intakes and higher body fat linked to anxiety disorders
New research from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging shows that adults who have low fruit and vegetable intakes have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. (2020-02-27)

Journal maps intersection of immigration and aging
A new special issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America explores how contemporary trends in immigration, migration, and refugee movement affect how people age and how societies care for aging people. (2020-02-26)

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