Current Incarceration News and Events

Current Incarceration News and Events, Incarceration News Articles.
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Racism and anti-gay discrimination heighten risk for arrest and incarceration
New research by Morgan Philbin, PhD, at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues looks at why Black young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately subject to high rates of arrest and incarceration. They find that perceived racial discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, and HIV-status discrimination are all associated with risk for criminal justice involvement in this population. (2021-02-09)

Northwestern researcher to discuss consequences of incarceration at AAAS annual meeting
Teplin will moderate the scientific session ''Consequences of Incarceration on Health Inequity and Racial Injustice'' at 2 p.m. EST, Monday, Feb. 8. During the session, she will also present ''Consequences of Incarceration in Detained Youth: A 15-Year Longitudinal Study.'' (2021-02-08)

Adolescent involvement with firearms linked to gun violence in adulthood
A new study by Northwestern University researchers finds involvement with firearms by high-risk youth is associated with firearm violence during adulthood. 'Association of Firearm Access, Use, and Victimization During Adolescence with Firearm Perpetration During Adulthood in a 16-year Longitudinal Study of Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System' will publish in JAMA Network Open at 10 a.m. CST, Thursday, Feb. 4. (2021-02-04)

Study aims to break the chains of incarceration in African American males
The majority of African American men return to prison within one to three years of their first release. A study explores why re-entry programs aren't as effective for them when compared to others. Researchers suggest a holistic approach that addresses psychological and historical trauma in conjunction with the environmental factors that perpetuate the stigma justice-involved African American men experience. The approach accounts for negative associations developed in the centuries of oppression and segregation that shape their current societal interactions. (2021-02-02)

Social & structural factors influence racial disparities in COVID-19 mortality
COVID-19 mortality racial disparities in the US are associated with social factors like income, education and internet access, rather than biology, according to a Rutgers study. (2021-01-31)

Do children view punishment as rehabilitative? A new study takes a look
The United States incarcerates more residents than any other country, however there is limited research that examines how people view such punishment, and whether views about punishment change with development. Researchers examined this in two studies exploring children's and adults' views about the impact of punishment on perceived moral character. (2021-01-19)

Examining association of age, household dysfunction, outcomes in early adulthood
Population data from Denmark were used to examine whether age at exposure to negative experiences in childhood and adolescence (parents' unemployment, incarceration, mental disorders, death and divorce, and the child's foster care experiences) was associated with outcomes in early adulthood. (2021-01-07)

Adverse childhood experiences are linked to justice system contact
A new paper released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports a strong association between a high number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and contact with the U.S. justice system. Analyzing data from eleven studies, the researchers found that results were consistent across multiple types of justice system contact and across diverse geographic regions of the country. (2020-12-16)

Engaged dads can reduce adolescent behavioral problems, improve well-being
In low-income families, fathers who are engaged in their children's lives can help to improve their mental health and behavior, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in the journal Social Service Review. (2020-12-09)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes. (2020-11-30)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Center for Justice Research Police Reform Action Brief: Ban chokeholds
A chokehold ban will help move this country further toward the elimination of racially-motivated police violence and the longstanding tensions/distrust between minority communities and the police. (2020-11-16)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard Bullen and Tets Kimura examine some exquisite Japanese artworks produced during the extended period of war incarceration. (2020-09-04)

Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood. (2020-09-02)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

Save black lives
The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and the Black Public Defender Association today released ''Save Black Lives: A Call for Racially-responsive Strategies and Resources for the Black Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic,'' a comprehensive report that details why public health responses and strategies to address COVID-19 must be centered around race and the criminal legal system. (2020-08-05)

Group-based smoking cessation help US inmates quit tobacco
Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-07-30)

Expanded access to treatment in prisons can reduce overdose deaths by 31.6%, study finds
Using a microsimulation model, researchers at Brown predicted the number of opioid-related overdose deaths related to three different treatment options over the course of 8 years. (2020-07-22)

How prison and police discrimination affect black sexual minority men's health
Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers led study. (2020-07-02)

Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk
The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems. More than a quarter of correctional facilities in the Southwest reported average arsenic levels exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 10 μg/L maximum contaminant level. (2020-06-22)

Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good
Serving police officer and Huddersfield PhD researcher Dan Jones warns against police forces adopting an authoritarian or militarised approach, following new study (2020-06-15)

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (2020-06-11)

Major gaps in HIV programs in Africa
HIV management in developing countries varies with socioeconomic and structural circumstances, with two Flinders University studies finding examples of key ways to close the gap for those worst affected in developing countries. The studies, just published in PLoS ONE journal, call for reforms to nutritional programs and for better treatment of HIV affected prisoners - providing guidance for several sub-Saharan regions as well as other low and middle-income countries. (2020-05-31)

Providing child support after prison: Some state policies may miss the mark
Many states have policies that attempt to help formerly incarcerated people find work by limiting an employer's ability to access or use criminal records as part of the hiring process. But there is little evidence that these restrictions are helping non-resident fathers provide financial support to their children. (2020-05-04)

Working as peer-support specialist helps people with criminal and psychiatric histories
As houses of detention increasingly turn to early-release initiatives in the pandemic, a study explores a hopeful reintegration path for the formerly incarcerated with mental illness. (2020-04-30)

Teeth serve as 'archive of life,' new research finds
Teeth constitute a permanent and faithful biological archive of the entirety of the individual's life, from tooth formation to death, a team of researchers has found. Its work provides new evidence of the impact that events, such as reproduction and imprisonment, have on an organism. (2020-03-25)

Patients most at risk of overdose at the beginning and after end of methadone treatment
A new study, led by RCSI researchers, has found that patients receiving methadone treatment are most at risk of overdosing in the month following the end of methadone treatment and during the first four weeks of treatment. (2020-02-20)

Incarceration of a family member during childhood associated with diabetes in men
Men who experienced a family member's incarceration are 64% more likely to have diabetes in later adulthood, compared to those who were not exposed to this childhood adversity, report researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Alabama in a recent study in SAGE-Open Medicine. (2020-02-05)

Maino and the emergence of hip-hop as a source of mental resilience
Born in Brooklyn, New York, the rap artist Maino (Jermaine John Colman) takes his experiences not only from growing up in the famous borough, but also the 10 long years he spent behind bars at Riker's Island Penitentiary. A new dialogue paper, by two academics and co-founders of HIP HOP PSYCH (HHP) in Forensic Science International: Mind and Law, published by Elsevier, review Maino's time behind bars using his lyrics, and exploring the connections between hip-hop, mental health and resilience. (2020-01-30)

A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners
Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society. A simple conversation could help. (2020-01-09)

Helicopter parents and 'hothouse children' -- exploring the high stakes of family dynamics
Kristin Moilanen, associate professor of child development and family studies, said the phenomena of helicopter parenting most often occurs in middle- to upper-class families where stakes are high for parents to be able to show off their children's success. Her research, which focuses on young adults 18- to 24- years-old, indicates that high helicopter parenting leads to 'low mastery, self-regulation and social competence.' (2019-11-18)

Researchers challenge myth of the relationship between mental illness and incarceration
Researchers examined the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and future incarceration by merging data from psychiatric interviews that took place in the 1980s with 30 years of follow-up data. Among other things, they found that diagnoses of substance use and antisocial personality were predictors of future incarceration but that other psychiatric diagnoses (i.e., schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, as well as some other psychiatric disorders) were not independent predictors. (2019-11-07)

Risk assessment tools lead to fewer incarcerations without jeopardizing public safety
A sweeping study looking at an extensive collection of data -- involving more than a million offenders at 30 different Canadian and US research sites -- found that while fewer people were being locked up, crime rates showed some declines. (2019-10-28)

Restrictive housing is associated with increased risk of death after release from prison
A new study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that being held in restrictive housing (i.e., solitary confinement) is associated with an increased risk of death after a person is released from prison. (2019-10-04)

Immigrants who committed felonies less likely than nonimmigrants to commit another felony
A new study compared recidivism rates of foreign-born and native-born individuals formerly incarcerated for felonies and released from prisons in Florida. It found that immigrants are significantly less likely to reoffend by committing another felony than their nonimmigrant peers. (2019-09-18)

Study: Spend more on housing, teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed
New research: Spend more on transitional housing and teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed. (2019-09-18)

Young adults exposed to incarceration as children prone to depression
Young adults with childhood history of both parental incarceration and juvenile justice involvement were nearly three times more likely to have depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to peers without any experience with the criminal justice system, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. (2019-09-04)

Is childhood criminal justice exposure associated with risk of poor adult mental health?
A childhood history of both personal involvement in the juvenile justice system and parental incarceration was associated with a greater likelihood of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder in young adulthood compared to peers without those experiences in this observational study. And, having either one of those experiences with the criminal justice system as a child was associated with risk of adverse mental health outcomes. (2019-09-04)

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