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Current Incarceration News and Events, Incarceration News Articles.
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Children of incarcerated parents have more substance abuse, anxiety
Children of incarcerated parents are six times more likely to develop a substance use disorder in adulthood and nearly twice as likely to have diagnosable anxiety compared to children whose parents were not incarcerated, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. (2019-08-23)

Poor health increases chance of recidivism, reincarceration, says Rutgers-Cam
Poor physical or mental health increases the chance that formerly incarcerated individuals will commit more crimes and return to prison, according to a groundbreaking new Rutgers University-Camden study. The study - conducted by Nathan Link and Richard Stansfield, assistant professors of criminal justice at Rutgers-Camden, and Jeffrey Ward, an associate professor of criminal justice at Temple University - advances a health-based model of desistance showing how both mental and physical health affect the chances of maintaining employment and positive family relationships, and ultimately recidivism. (2019-08-05)

The Lancet Public Health: Incarceration and economic hardship strongly associated with drug-related deaths in the USA
Growing rates of incarceration in the USA since the mid-1970s may be linked with a rise in drug-related mortality, and may exacerbate the harmful health effects of economic hardship, according to an observational study involving 2,640 US counties between 1983 and 2014, published in The Lancet Public Health journal. (2019-07-03)

Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researcher finds
Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (2019-06-25)

Prison-based college presents challenges, but can succeed, study finds
Interest in prison-based education has grown in recent years as an approach to reduce recidivism and improve the future of people who are incarcerated for crimes. A study of a North Carolina program finds that creating a prison-based program where incarcerated individuals can take college classes and then work toward a degree upon release can be successful, but many obstacles challenge the success of such efforts. (2019-05-22)

Study explores privatization of public systems of justice
A new study sought to determine the points at which individuals who encounter public systems of justice are charged by private entities. The study found that private firms that work with public entities in the justice system charge money for their services at numerous points, that some of the charges are mandated, and that there is little transparency into or oversight over how these public-private partnerships operate. (2019-05-13)

High rates of Indigenous people in jail is a health crisis
The overincarceration of Indigenous people in Canada is a health crisis, causing more years of life to be lost than premature death from heart disease, injuries and cancer, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-05-06)

Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher. The findings show how an approach that provides community-based primary care can play a role in the nationwide effort to decrease prison populations. (2019-05-02)

Study: Medication treatment reduces arrests among people with opioid use disorder
When it comes to addressing the national opioid crisis, most of the research has focused on the physical health risks faced by people with opioid use disorder, such as overdose and infectious disease. For the first time, a University of Massachusetts Amherst public health scientist studied the impact of treating opioid use disorder on the risk for arrest and incarceration, comparing the effects of two different medications approved for the condition. (2019-04-09)

First of its kind statistics on pregnant women in US prisons
In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind systematic look at pregnancy frequency and outcomes among imprisoned US women, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say almost 1,400 pregnant women were admitted to 22 US state and all federal prisons in a recent year. They also found that most of the prison pregnancies -- over 90 percent -- ended in live births with no maternal deaths. (2019-03-21)

Former inmates need social supports to maintain mental health, Rutgers study says
Men released from prison who receive social, community and spiritual support have better mental health, according to a study by researchers at Rutgers School of Public Health. (2019-03-19)

Nearly half of Americans have had a family member jailed, imprisoned
A groundbreaking Cornell-led study included for the first time data for both prison and jail time to illuminate the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the US, nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a brother or sister, parent, spouse or child spend time in jail or prison -- a far higher figure than previously estimated. (2019-03-04)

Suicide deaths among incarcerated youth
According to a US Department of Justice survey, from 2000 to 2014, suicide rates were two to three times higher for youth in custody than those in the general population. In a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital looked at circumstances preceding suicide to understand better why this disparity in suicide rate exists. (2019-01-23)

Study finds correlation between eviction rates in the US and high number of STIs
A study by researchers from Yale University and American University outlines a correlation between America's eviction crisis and the high rate of sexually transmitted infections in the United States. (2019-01-23)

Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit
What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? Neurobiologists at UNIGE have discovered that the brain circuit connecting the decision-making region to the reward system is stronger in compulsive animals. The researchers also found that by decreasing the activity of this circuit, compulsive mice were able to regain control and that conversely, by stimulating the connection a mouse that initially remained in control became addicted. (2018-12-19)

Recommendations to reduce recidivism in transgender women
Previously incarcerated transgender women can find themselves caught in a cycle that leads to repeat jail time. A new analysis of Allegheny County by University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers identifies potential solutions that could lead to transgender women being more successfully reintegrated into society. (2018-11-14)

Solitary confinement puts brains at risk
Some 80,000 Americans are incarcerated in solitary confinement on any given day, a practice that was deemed cruel and unusual punishment by the United Nations Committee on Torture. This extreme isolation can be damaging and may cause or worsen depression, anxiety, and other mental illness. A roundtable of scientists, a physician, a lawyer, and an individual held in solitary for 29 years will explore the psychological and neurobiological burdens of solitary confinement at Neuroscience 2018. (2018-11-04)

Previously jailed vets at increased risk of suicide
Researchers are now looking at the healthcare services used by people who attempted suicide to find patterns that could help identify who is most at risk before an attempt is made. (2018-10-31)

Retention in HIV care drops after release from incarceration
Fewer than half of people with HIV are retained in care three years after release from incarceration, according to a study in the US published Oct. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Kelsey Loeliger of Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues. The findings also suggest that better access to health insurance and transitional case-management services may improve retention in HIV care and viral suppression in this population. (2018-10-09)

Children whose mothers use marijuana may try it at a younger age
Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to start their own marijuana use an average of two years earlier than children whose mothers don't use the drug, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2018-09-24)

HIV and a tale of a few cities
In a pair of new modeling studies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with international colleagues, examined how policy reform in terms of drug decriminalization (in Mexico) and access to drug treatment (in Russia) might affect two regions hard hit by the HIV pandemic: Tijuana, Mexico and the Russian cities of Omsk and Ekaterinburg. (2018-08-17)

Lynchings of the past affect health today
Counties with higher rates of lynching between 1877 and 1950 showed higher mortality rates between 2010 and 2014. A new study by researchers from the University of South Carolina in the US, led by Janice Probst and Saundra Glover, looks into the relationship between past occurrence of lynching -- unpunished, racially motivated murder -- and recent death rates. (2018-07-26)

Incarceration of parents impacts health of their children into adulthood
A new study published in Pediatrics found that young adults who had a parent incarcerated during their childhood are more likely to skip needed healthcare, smoke cigarettes, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and abuse alcohol, prescription and illicit drugs. These findings have a potentially broad impact, as more than five million US children have had a parent in jail or prison. (2018-07-17)

Lifetime sentence: Incarcerated parents impact youth behavior
Young adults who had parents incarcerated during childhood do not receive timely healthcare and have more unhealthy behaviors, Lurie Children's researchers find. (2018-07-09)

Prop. 47 lessened racial disparities in drug arrests
In 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reclassified drug possession offenses from felonies to misdemeanors, and in the process reduced the state's prison and jail populations. Now, a study out of UC San Francisco has quantified the effects of the ballot measure, which was at the leading edge of a national movement to reduce incarceration rates and change the criminal justice approach to substance use disorders. (2018-06-21)

Risk assessment tools may increase incarcerations rates
New research from a Rice University sociologist suggests risk assessment tools may contribute to expanding the number of people caught up in the criminal justice system. (2018-06-06)

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. (2018-06-05)

Even brief maternal deprivation early in life alters adult brain function and cognition
When a baby is taken from its mother for even a brief period early in life, this traumatic event significantly alters the future, adult function of the brain, according to a new animal model study from the School of Science at IUPUI. These changes in the brain are similar to disturbances in brain structure and function that are found in people at risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. (2018-05-03)

Research predicts likelihood of HIV testing based on race, sex/gender & sexual orientation
A new study has identified factors that lead to increased HIV testing among young adults, specifically how a person's race, sex/gender, and sexual orientation is connected to their likelihood of getting tested for HIV. (2018-04-05)

Social determinants of health linked to HIV mortality rates
People who are living with HIV in Ontario have access to good health care and medications, yet they are still dying younger and at substantially higher rates than the rest of the population, according to a new study published today. (2018-03-19)

Check offenders for history of head injuries, experts say
Offenders should be routinely checked for signs of past head injuries, researchers say. (2018-02-26)

Study finds opportunity to increase opioid dependence treatment in Ontario jails
The study included completion of an online survey by 27 physicians, who reported working in 15 of 26 provincial correctional facilities for adults in Ontario. This included 10 of the 13 facilities with a population of more than 200. The study identified that about half of the physicians prescribed methadone and half prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid dependence. (2018-02-15)

Examination of postincarceration fatal overdoses after addiction treatment medications in correctional system
There were fewer postincarceration deaths from overdose among recently released inmates after a program was started to provide medications for addiction treatment (including methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) in a state correctional system. (2018-02-14)

Opioid addiction treatment behind bars reduced post-incarceration overdose deaths in RI
A new study in JAMA Psychiatry suggests that treating people for opioid addiction in jails and prisons is a promising strategy to address high rates of overdose and opioid use disorder. (2018-02-14)

BU: Police shootings reflect structural racism
The deaths of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, and other unarmed black victims at the hands of police sparked a national conversation about racism and policing, from the Black Lives Matter movement to kneeling NFL players. But a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds states with a greater degree of structural racism, particularly residential segregation, have higher racial disparities in fatal police shootings of unarmed victims. (2018-02-05)

Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggests
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder (2017-12-04)

Study shows voting does not reduce crime
A randomized controlled experiment of 550,000 potential voters in the United States shows that voting does not make people less likely to subsequently commit a crime. (2017-10-31)

Managing risky behavior reduces future incarceration among aggressive juvenile offenders
Clinically aggressive juvenile offenders on probation in Cook County, Illinois, who participated in a two-week intervention program focusing on reducing risky behavior were four times less likely to be incarcerated in the 12 months after the intervention than their peers who participated in an information-based health promotion program. (2017-10-24)

Study reveals risk factors for substance use problems, as well as resilience
A new study explores factors increasing the risk for substance use problems among African-American/Black and Latino adults residing in a high-risk urban community, as well as patterns of resilience. It reveals that serious risk factors are highly prevalent and strongly associated with substance misuse; however, a substantial proportion could be characterized as resilient, and evidenced substance use problems at rates comparable to the general U.S. population. (2017-10-16)

Research IDs key factors that help women ex-convicts avoid recidivism
New research identifies four factors that help women ex-convicts avoid committing crimes, offering insights that can be used to help former inmates integrate more successfully into their communities after time in prison. (2017-10-09)

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