Current Inequality News and Events

Current Inequality News and Events, Inequality News Articles.
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COVID-19 cases, deaths in US increase with higher income inequality
US counties with higher income inequality faced higher rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths in the first 200 days of the pandemic, according to a new study. Counties with higher proportions of Black or Hispanic residents also had higher rates. The findings, published by JAMA Network Open, were based on county-level data for all 50 states and Washington, D.C. The lead author was Tim Liao, a sociology professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. (2021-01-25)

Association of social, economic inequality with COVID-19 across US counties
This investigation analyzed U.S. county-level associations of income inequality, racial/ethnic composition and political attributes with COVID-19 cases and mortality. (2021-01-20)

Researchers realize efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation
In a study published in Physical Review Letters, the team led by academician GUO Guangcan from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) made progress in high dimensional quantum teleportation. The researchers demonstrated the teleportation of high-dimensional states in a three-dimensional six-photon system. (2021-01-08)

Global disparities in vaccination persist and leave many children at risk
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, tens of millions of children worldwide were not receiving basic doses of vaccines. New research finds there continue to be significant disparities in childhood vaccination, and poorer children from under-represented and minority groups in most countries are more likely to be less fully vaccinated with all the recommended immunizations. A special supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine looks at the barriers and challenges that limit or prevent access to vaccines in vulnerable children. (2020-12-22)

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on the conditions of the neighborhoods its residents visit and are visited by. (2020-12-17)

Empowering women could help address climate change
Current and future damages of climate change depend greatly on the ability of affected populations to adapt to changing conditions. According to an international group of researchers, building capacity to adapt to such changes will require eradicating inequalities of many sorts, including gender. (2020-12-15)

New research points to effective ways to increase support for addressing ec
Researchers have found that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue and to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality. (2020-12-14)

Explained: Political polarization
Polarization - which divides the population into belligerent groups with rigidly opposed beliefs and identities - has a steely grip on the United States, and a University of Houston researcher reports that economic inequality is to blame. (2020-12-14)

'Windows of opportunity' crucial for cutting Chesapeake nutrient, sediment loads
The vast majority of nutrients and sediment washed into streams flowing into the Chesapeake Bay are picked up by deluges from severe storms that occur on relatively few days of the year. That is the conclusion of a new study led by Penn State researchers, who say it offers clues for cleaning up the impaired estuary. (2020-12-14)

Polarization increases with economic decline, becoming cripplingly contagious
Polarization tends to soar in times of economic duress and rising inequality. Yet, even after financial conditions improve, these divisions may remain deeply rooted, according to a new model debuted in Science Advances. (2020-12-11)

Infant health inequality has increased since 2010, study finds
After decades of narrowing gaps in health between infants born to the most and least advantaged American mothers, infant health inequality is increasing, portending a rise in health and social inequity that could last for decades. (2020-12-08)

Can gender inequality kill? Paper looks at impact among older Indian women
Indian women past childbearing age are dying at a higher rate than those in other countries because of poverty and limited access to resources such as food and health care, according to a study from Rice University, (2020-12-07)

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers. (2020-12-03)

Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
A team of researchers have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how they develop over time. They discovered that there are detailed similarities with the social networks of humans and that these similarities are completely explained by new theoretical modeling, which adapts the tools of statistical physics for biology. The theory, confirmed in experiments, implies that there are individual differences between honey bees, just as there are between humans. (2020-11-30)

Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-11-30)

Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says. (2020-11-27)

Teacher quality scores change depending on students, school, PSU study finds
School districts across the U.S. are increasingly using student test scores to rate the effectiveness of teachers, but a new Portland State University study found that the scores have less to do with individual teachers and more to do with their students and the schools. (2020-11-12)

Depression and anxiety are more frequently diagnosed in women
According to a study conducted by the UPV/EHU's OPIK research group, the hypothesis on the increased biological vulnerability of women is inconsistent, which would suggest that unequal conditions of life between men and women, together with the prevailing hegemonic models of masculinity and femininity, could account for these gender inequalities in mental health. (2020-11-03)

How people would choose who gets scarce COVID-19 treatment
As COVID-19 cases begin climbing again in the United States, the possibility arises of a grim moral dilemma: Which patients should be prioritized if medical resources are scarce? A study of more than 5,000 people in 11 countries found that people worldwide gave two characteristics the most weight when they made their decision: age and probability of survival. (2020-10-29)

Estimating risk of airborne COVID-19 with mask usage, social distancing
In Physics of Fluids, researchers used a model to understand airborne transmission that is designed to be accessible to a wide range of people, including nonscientists. Employing concepts of fluid dynamics and factors in airborne transmission, they propose the Contagion Airborne Transmission inequality model. While not all factors may be known, it can still be used to assess relative risks. The researchers determined protection from transmission increases with physical distancing in an approximately linear proportion. (2020-10-26)

Democracy: Millennials are the most disillusioned generation 'in living memory' - global study
Globally, millennials are most dissatisfied with democracy, and more so than previous generations were when under 35. Major Cambridge report analysed data from close to 5 million people from 160 nations across almost half a century. Researchers find millennials are most satisfied with democracy under populist leaders, the sole exception being the Trump presidency. Millennials in developed democracies are more likely to judge political opponents as 'morally flawed' than older voters. (2020-10-19)

Gender inequalities accelerate during early adolescence, study finds
Early adolescence is where gender inequalities most markedly emerge, according to new research from across 40 low- and middle-income countries in Asia and the Pacific. (2020-10-19)

Women's incomes improve when democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages, and unemployment relative to men. (2020-10-08)

Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5
UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old. The research, published in Health Affairs, contributes to a growing body of literature finding that children of color who are also poor face greater health inequities than their white counterparts. (2020-10-08)

Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries. Greater economic inequality is also associated with COVID-19 mortality. (2020-10-07)

COVID-19 disproportionately affects low-income workers' finances in developing countries
Results from a large-scale survey of households in Latin America and the Caribbean show that the negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been concentrated among those who had lower incomes prior to the pandemic, according to a study published October 7 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Bottan of Cornell University, Bridget Hoffmann and Diego Vera-Cossio of the Inter-American Development Bank. (2020-10-07)

Inequalities in premature deaths have increased between the rich and poor in Canada
Socioeconomic inequalities in premature deaths in Canada have increased over the last 25 years, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191723. (2020-09-28)

A question of reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, 'Real or Not Real: that is the question', explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications. (2020-09-24)

Dismantling structural racism in nursing
Confronting the uncomfortable reality of systemic racism - the system that creates and maintains racial inequality in every facet of life for people of color - is having a national heyday. But calling out this injustice and doing something about it are two different things. (2020-09-09)

Study highlights ties between racism and activism in black youth
A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth. (2020-09-08)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One. (2020-09-04)

Personal success more appreciated than team dominance in sports, business
People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals - from athletes to CEOs -extend long runs of dominance in their fields, but they aren't as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups, according to new research from Cornell University. (2020-09-03)

New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study. (2020-08-24)

Revealed: How billions in EU farming subsidies are being misspent
A unique study has analyzed in detail how EU agricultural subsidies flow down to the local level. The new data show that most income support payments go to intensively farmed regions already above median EU income, while climate-friendly and biodiverse farming regions, as well as poorer regions, are insufficiently funded. Consequently, the majority of payments are going to the regions causing the most environmental damage and the farmers in the least need of income support. (2020-08-21)

Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclusion of a new large-scale study conducted at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-08-19)

Creating meaningful change in cities takes decades, not years, and starts from the bottom
New mathematical models reveal the links between the structure of cities and the dynamical nature of growth and inequality in human societies (2020-08-19)

Women less likely to receive pay for college internships
The odds of women receiving pay for a college internship are 34% lower than for men, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-08-18)

New tool improves fairness of online search rankings
In a new paper, Cornell University researchers introduce a tool they've developed to improve the fairness of online rankings without sacrificing their usefulness or relevance. (2020-08-18)

Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)

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