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Current Infection News and Events, Infection News Articles.
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Identification of the SARS-CoV-2 virus features causing COVID-19 using primate model
Features of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19, which could be useful for developing vaccines and treatment strategies, were identified using a nonhuman primate model developed at the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology(KRIBB). (2020-11-15)

People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity. People from Asian backgrounds are 1.5 times more likely to become infected with the virus compared to White individuals. Those of Asian ethnicities may be at higher risk of admission to an intensive therapy unit (ITU) and death. (2020-11-12)

Rats also capable of transmitting hantavirus
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have confirmed Germany's first-ever case of animal-to-human transmission involving a specific species of virus known as the 'Seoul virus'. Working alongside colleagues from Friedrich-Loeffer-Institut (FLI), the researchers were able to confirm the presence of the virus in a young female patient and her pet rat. (2020-11-12)

Mimicking SARS-CoV-2 nasal infection in monkeys
A new rhesus macaque animal model recapitulates the clinical and pathological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) observed in humans by mimicking natural infection via the nasal route, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Longding Liu, Qihan Li, Zhanlong He, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the new animal model could lead to effective treatments or vaccines for COVID-19, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). (2020-11-12)

Yale scientists identify protein that protects against Lyme
Yale researchers have discovered a protein that helps protect hosts from infection with the tick-borne spirochete that causes Lyme Disease, a finding that may help diagnose and treat this infection, they report Nov. 11 in the journal PLOS Pathogens. (2020-11-11)

Accuracy of rapid COVID test may be lower than previously suggested
The accuracy of a rapid finger-prick antibody test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for covid-19 infection, may be considerably lower than previously suggested, finds a study published by The BMJ. (2020-11-11)

In the Netherlands, two-way transmission of SARS-CoV-2 transmission on mink farms
In the Netherlands, whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks on 16 mink farms has revealed virus transmission between human to mink, as well as from mink to human. (2020-11-10)

Researchers discover enzyme suppressing immune response to viral infections
Viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C evade or disrupt the immune system to create persistent infections. These viruses remain a serious health threat, but researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how an enzyme that regulates several cellular processes might be a key target to preventing viruses from disarming the human immune response. (2020-11-10)

Study finds lasting fatigue common after COVID-19 infection
More than half of people with acute COVID-19 infection continue to have persistent fatigue 10 weeks after their initial illness, according to a new study published November 9 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Liam Townsend of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and colleagues. (2020-11-10)

Severe COVID-19 infection rare in newborns
Severe COVID-19 infection appears rare in newborn babies, suggests a new study. (2020-11-09)

COVID-19 infection rates low in people with rheumatic diseases, most report mild illness
A new study shows that the COVID-19 infection incidence has been low in people with rheumatic diseases, and most of those infected experience a mild course of illness. Additionally, fatalities have been low among rheumatic disease patients infected with COVID-19. Details of this research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Stable protein decoy neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cells and protected hamsters from viral challenge
Researchers have designed a protein 'decoy' that mimics the interface where the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds a human cell, one version of which could neutralize virus infection in cells and protect hamsters from viral challenge. (2020-11-05)

Delirium could be an early marker of COVID-19
Delirium accompanied by fever could be an early symptom of COVID-19. This is the main conclusion drawn by a scientific research review carried out by researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and published in the open access Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, which highlights the fact that, together with the loss of the senses of taste and smell and headaches that occur in the days prior to the manifestation of coughing and breathing difficulties, some patients also develop delirium. (2020-11-04)

Researchers identify key marker to help speed development of CMV vaccines
A Duke Health-led research team has identified a key marker that will help speed effective vaccine designs for cytomegalovirus (CMV), the most common congenital infection worldwide and a leading cause of infant brain damage. (2020-11-04)

Coronavirus infection odds twice as high among Black, Latinx hospital workers
Support staff and Black and Latinx hospital employees with and without patient care responsibilities are at highest risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection in health care settings, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-04)

Review finds almost 20% of COVID-19 patients only show gastrointestinal symptoms
Almost one in five patients with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a review of academic studies published in the journal Abdominal Radiology. The findings of the review suggest abdominal radiologists need to remain vigilant during the pandemic while imaging patients. (2020-11-03)

Some of the principal treatments for osteoporosis could reduce the incidence of COVID-19
A joint study by physicians at Hospital del Mar, researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Pompeu Fabra University and the Pere Virgili Health Care Park suggests that certain drugs used to treat osteoporosis are safe for COVID-19 patients and could even have a protective effect. The results support the recommendations of the scientific guidelines relating to the desirability of maintaining treatments for osteoporosis in patients with COVID-19. This is the first study of its kind in the world. (2020-11-03)

For plant and animal immune systems the similarities go beyond sensing
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) and University of Cologne researcher Takaki Maekawa and colleagues have discovered that plants have independently evolved a family of immune proteins that are strikingly similar to animals. (2020-11-02)

Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system? Norwegian researchers are collecting sperm to find the answer. (2020-10-30)

Stronger treatments could cure Chagas disease
Researchers in the University of Georgia's Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases have found that a more intensive, less frequent drug regimen with currently available therapeutics could cure the infection that causes Chagas disease (2020-10-29)

Models show how COVID-19 cuts a neighborhood path
A research team led by UC Irvine and the University of Washington has created a new model of how the coronavirus can spread through a community. The model factors in network exposure -- whom one interacts with -- and demographics to simulate at a more detailed level both where and how quickly the coronavirus could spread through Seattle and 18 other major cities. (2020-10-29)

High rate of symptomless COVID-19 infection among grocery store workers
Grocery store employees are likely to be at heightened risk of COVID-19 infection, with those in customer-facing roles 5 times as likely to test positive as their colleagues in other positions, suggests the first study of its kind, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-10-29)

Study shows COVID-19 risk to firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City
Firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City were 15 times more likely to be infected during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the general public, according to a study published in ERJ Open Research. (2020-10-29)

Study of COVID-19 levels in oncology staff suggests need for more extensive testing
A study of oncology staff carried out immediately after the spring peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK indicates that many had been infected with the coronavirus as they tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. This included staff who did not show any symptoms. (2020-10-29)

Why are some COVID-19 infected people asymptomatic?
Immune cells in the lungs are important for the immune system's recognition and fight against viruses. However, the virus that produces COVID-19 is not recognised by these cells, as the virus may hide its genomic material, and as a result the cells' immune system against the virus is not activated. This may help explain why some people with COVID-19 are asymptomatic in the early stages of the disease. (2020-10-28)

In study of 30,000 mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients, antibody responses can persist for five months
Researchers who studied antibody responses in 30,000 patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 report that the patients' antibodies were relatively stable for at least five months. (2020-10-28)

Random effects key to containing epidemics
To control an epidemic, authorities will often impose varying degrees of lockdown. In the journal Chaos, scientists have discovered, using mathematics and computer simulations, why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities. When infection numbers are high, random effects can be ignored. But subdividing a population can create communities so small that the random effects matter. (2020-10-27)

COVID-19: Call for millions spent on failing system to be diverted to local services
A group of doctors is calling on the government to divert the hundreds of millions of pounds being spent on the failing centralised privatised COVID-19 national test and trace service into local primary care, local NHS labs and local public health services. (2020-10-27)

The first ever international Wounds Week was a resounding success
The 8th International Skin Integrity and Infection Prevention Conference: Demystifying Wound Infection: Improving Patient Outcomes was redesigned into an online Wounds Week and has proved to be so successful it will most certainly happen again. (2020-10-26)

New COVID-19 related genes -- helpful and harmful -- found in massive screen
Researchers at Yale University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus. The pro-viral and anti-viral role of these genes will help guide scientists in development of new therapies to combat COVID-19, the researchers say. (2020-10-26)

Knowing the model you can trust - the key to better decision-making
As much of Europe is engulfed by a second wave of Covid-19, and track and trace struggles to meet demand, modelling support tools are being increasingly used by policymakers to make key decisions. Most notably, models have been used to predict the Covid-19 R0 rate - the average rate of secondary infections from a single infection, which has formed the basis for many lockdown decisions across the UK. (2020-10-23)

Antiretroviral therapy can't completely stop accelerated cell aging seen in HIV
Untreated HIV infection is linked with epigenetic changes that suggest rapid aging. A new study by UCLA researchers shows that antiretroviral therapy given over two years was unable to completely restore age-appropriate epigenetic patterns, leaving patients more susceptible to aging-related illnesses. (2020-10-22)

'Mini-lungs' reveal early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection
'Mini-lungs' grown from tissue donated to Cambridge hospitals has provided a team of scientists from South Korea and the UK with important insights into how COVID-19 damages the lungs. Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the researchers detail the mechanisms underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection and the early innate immune response in the lungs. (2020-10-22)

Perspective: Understanding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy
In this Perspective, Marc Lipsitch and Natalie Dean consider what would happen if a COVID-19 vaccine offers little to no protection in high-risk groups, like the elderly and those with comorbidities, yet is able to reduce infection or infectiousness in younger adults. (2020-10-21)

Interactions within larger social groups can cause tipping points in contagion flow
Contagion processes, such as opinion formation or disease spread, can reach a tipping point, where the contagion either rapidly spreads or dies out. When modeling these processes, it is difficult to capture this complex transition. In the journal Chaos, researchers studied the parameters of these transitions by including three-person group interactions in a contagion model called the susceptible-infected-susceptible model. In this model, an infected person who recovers from an infection can be reinfected. (2020-10-20)

Ban on accommodation meets with mixed acceptance among the population
The majority of the population considers the measures introduced by the Federal Government and the Länder to stem the spread of the coronavirus to be appropriate. Only the recently introduced ban on accommodating people from risk areas within Germany is met with much less acceptance: Only 45% regard the regulation as appropriate. This is the result of the current issue of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). (2020-10-20)

Evidence review confirms CDC guidance about infectivity of novel coronavirus
A new review of dozens of studies suggests that people may shed virus for prolonged periods, but those with mild or no symptoms may be infectious for no more than about 10 days. People who are severely ill from COVID-19 may be infectious for as long as 20 days, according to the review. (2020-10-20)

Fats fighting back against bacteria
With antibiotic-resistant superbugs on the rise, this research shows a new way that cells are using to protect themselves - using fats as a covert weapon, and giving us new insights into alternative ways to fight infection. (2020-10-16)

Will the COVID-19 virus become endemic?
A new article in the journal Science by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in humans. (2020-10-15)

Mammalian lipid droplets organize and support innate host immunity
Mammalian lipid droplets -- tiny lipid-filled pockets floating amidst a cell's cytoplasm -- represent an intracellular first line of defense against microbial pathogens, researchers report. (2020-10-15)

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