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Current Infectious Disease News and Events, Infectious Disease News Articles.
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Pan-microbial study implicates a potential culprit in a pediatric brain disorder in Uganda
Researchers have identified a new species of bacteria that may contribute to the dangerous buildup of brain fluid after infections in newborns, according to their analysis of 100 infants in Uganda. (2020-09-30)

Scientists discover bacterium linked to deadly childhood disorder
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health have discovered bacteria linked to post-infectious hydrocephalus (PIH), the most common cause of pediatric hydrocephalus worldwide. Results of the study led by Pennsylvania State University with CII scientists and clinical colleagues in Uganda are published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-09-30)

Medical mystery: 'Creeping fat' in Crohn's patients linked to bacteria
Cedars-Sinai researchers might have solved a mystery surrounding Crohn's disease: Why does fat appear to migrate into patients' small intestines? (2020-09-30)

Scientists trace severe COVID-19 to faulty genes and an autoimmune condition
An international team led by Jean-Laurent Casanova has led to a breakthrough in understanding why only some people develop severe COVID-19: due to faulty genes or misguided antibodies, they lack type I interferons, proteins vital in protecting against viruses. The findings point to certain existing medical interventions as potentially beneficial treatments. (2020-09-24)

Scientists Discover Genetic and Immunologic Underpinnings of Some Cases of Severe COVID-19
New findings by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators help explain why some people with COVID-19 develop severe disease. The findings also may provide the first molecular explanation for why more men than women die from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

How is COVID-19 affecting Holocaust survivors?
Bar-Ilan University researchers examined whether exposure to specific Holocaust adversities would be related to amplified psychological reactions to COVID-19. They found that PTSD and loneliness were more prevalent among survivors who contracted infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and dysentery during the Holocaust relative to older adults who did not experience the Holocaust. Moreover, worries related to COVID-19 were more frequent among survivors who contracted infectious diseases during the Holocaust relative to other survivors or those who were not exposed to the Holocaust. (2020-09-23)

The Lancet journals: Papers at Lancet journals' session at ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID)
The following papers will be presented at a Lancet journals' session at ECCVID 2020, organised by European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. The conference will take place online on Wednesday 23rd to Friday 25th September 2020, the society's first online conference focussing exclusively on COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paran√° in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this chemical, thus preventing many known plant fungi from invading the host plant. (2020-09-22)

Herd immunity an impractical strategy, study finds
Achieving herd immunity to COVID-19 is an impractical public health strategy, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia scientists. The study recently appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-09-22)

Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread - 4000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife. (2020-09-21)

After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid detection of infectious diseases. (2020-09-18)

Virus in the blood can predict severe COVID-19
A blood test on hospital admission showing the presence or absence of SARS-CoV-2 can identify patients at a high risk of severe COVID-19. Admitted patients without virus in their blood have a good chance of rapid recovery. This according to researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital in a new study published in the scientific journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2020-09-02)

Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks. (2020-09-02)

Study finds asymptomatic Chagas patients are at a high risk for cardiac disease
People living with Chagas disease without symptoms or signs of cardiac injury are at high risk of developing cardiomyopathy, a progressive heart disease, and the risk more than doubled among patients with acute infections, according to a new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-08-31)

Vaccine narrows racial disparities in pneumococcal disease
In a major public health success, the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PCV13, or Prevnar 13, in 2010 in the United States is associated with reduction in socioeconomic disparities and the near elimination of Black-white-based racial disparities for invasive pneumococcal disease. (2020-08-31)

Single-use N95 respirators can be decontaminated and used again, study finds
N95 respirators, which are widely worn by health care workers treating patients with COVID-19 and are designed to be used only once, can be decontaminated effectively and used up to three times, UCLA scientists and colleagues report. (2020-08-27)

Study confirms link between influenza, heart complications
The link between influenza and serious heart conditions just grew stronger. A CDC study looking at more than 80,000 adult patients hospitalized with flu over eight seasons found that sudden, serious heart complications were common, occurring in 12% of patients, or 1 in 8. The study, published Aug. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, underscores the importance of getting a flu shot early, and the impact of respiratory infections on the heart. (2020-08-27)

Social distancing is instinctive but hard for humans and animals
Human beings and animals will practice social distancing to avoid disease--to a point. But for humans, benefits such as ''global disease surveillance, rapid global communication and centralized governments with public health departments,'' may be wasted if we choose our social instincts over the evolutionary instinct that tells us to stay away from areas of potential infection. (2020-08-26)

Pediatric outpatient visits for notifiable infectious diseases in Beijing Hospital during COVID-19
Strict public health measures were implemented in China in response to COVID-19 but little is known about whether other types of hospital visits were affected, especially those for other infectious diseases. Researchers explored changes in pediatric outpatient visits for notifiable infectious diseases acquired through droplet transmission, contact transmission or both during Beijing's COVID-19 outbreak. (2020-08-24)

Gaps in early surveillance of coronavirus led to record-breaking US trajectory
Research from the University of Notre Dame provides insight into how limited testing and gaps in surveillance during the initial phase of the epidemic resulted in so many cases going undetected.  (2020-08-21)

Is COVID-19 transmitted through breast milk? Study suggests not likely
A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk is not likely. The infectious virus was not detected in 64 samples of breast milk tested. (2020-08-19)

Airborne viruses can spread on dust, non-respiratory particles
Influenza viruses can spread through the air on dust, fibers and other microscopic particles, according to new research from UC Davis and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai. The findings, with obvious implications for coronavirus transmission as well as influenza, are published Aug. 18, 2020 in Nature Communications. (2020-08-18)

Low humidity increases COVID risk; another reason to wear a mask
University of Sydney study confirms a link between COVID-19 cases and lower humidity. (2020-08-18)

Evolution in real-time: How bacteria adapt to their hosts
Bacteria that invade animal cells in order to multiply are widespread in nature. Some of these are pathogens of humans and animals. (2020-08-18)

Digital contact tracing alone may not be miracle answer for COVID-19
In infectious disease outbreaks, digital contact tracing alone could reduce the number of cases, but not as much as manual contract tracing, new University of Otago-led research published in the Cochrane Library reveals. (2020-08-18)

Social distancing decreased paediatric respiratory tract infections in Finland
Finland declared a lockdown in response to the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020, and the ensuing social distancing measures decreased the number of paediatric emergency room visits to nearly one-third of what they used to be, according to a recent register-based study conducted in collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital and the National Institute for Health and Welfare. (2020-08-17)

Lack of continuous infectious disease pandemic research endangers responses
The coronavirus was also studied considerably less than blood borne viruses like Hepatitis B or C and H.I.V. and its research community has less prolific researchers than the other investigated diseases. This translates into limited collaborations and a non-sustained investment in research on coronaviruses. Such a short-lived investment also reduces funding and may slow down important developments such as new drugs, vaccines or preventive strategies. (2020-08-17)

Naturally occurring antibodies against prion proteins found in humans
Antibodies targeting the normal PrP version of the prion protein have been found in humans selected at random with no history of any associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In EMBO Molecular Medicine, researchers at the University of Zurich and Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Switzerland report on active antibodies against PrP at high levels in a small proportion of individuals, 21 of 37,894 hospital patients screened for presence of anti-PrP IgGs, the most common form of immunoglobulin. (2020-08-17)

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. This review examines the behavioral responses to emerging diseases across the animal kingdom from frogs and wolves to lobsters, bats, and humans. The paper also addresses whether or not technology helps when it comes to dealing with humans and social distancing. (2020-08-12)

Modelling parasitic worm metabolism suggests strategy for developing new drugs against infection
Scientists have revealed a way to eradicate parasitic worms by stopping them from using alternative metabolism pathways provided by bacteria that live within them, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2020-08-11)

Protein uses two antiviral strategies to ward off infections
To protect humans against infection, a protein called MARCH8 tags the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) for destruction while it merely holds HIV hostage, a new study in eLife shows. (2020-08-11)

Bouncing, sticking, exploding viruses: Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2
Better understanding of the surface chemistry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is needed to reduce transmission and accelerate vaccine design. (2020-08-11)

What the rest of the world can learn from South Korea's COVID-19 response
As the world continues to closely monitor the newest coronavirus outbreak, the government of South Korea has been able to keep the disease under control without paralyzing the national health and economic systems. CU Denver researcher Jongeun You reviewed South Korea's public health policy to learn how the country managed coronavirus from January through April 2020. (2020-08-10)

Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it. (2020-08-07)

Unveiled: A channel SARS-CoV-2 may use to proceed with viral replication in the host cell
By visualizing coronavirus replication in an infected host cell, researchers may have answered a long-standing question about how newly synthesized coronavirus components are able to be incorporated into fully infectious viruses. (2020-08-06)

Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species. (2020-08-05)

Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature. (2020-08-05)

Experts issue back-to-school guidelines for pediatric solid organ transplant recipients
As school districts look ahead to a very different school year, pediatric infectious disease experts from across the United States convened to outline back-to-school safety guidelines for solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. The group, led by Kevin J. Downes, MD, attending physician in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), published their recommendations today in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. (2020-08-04)

Better outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients administered interleukin-6 inhibitors early
New research from Boston Medical Center found that patients experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms had improved outcomes when administered an Interleukin-6 (IL6ri) inhibitor, sarilumab or tocilizumab, given to mediate severe systemic inflammatory responses. The treatment was more effective when administered earlier in the disease course and reduced mortality rates and the need for intubation. (2020-08-04)

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. Their findings, published online August 3 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, could change laboratory and clinical practice across the US and potentially around the globe (2020-08-03)

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