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Current Infectious Diseases News and Events

Current Infectious Diseases News and Events, Infectious Diseases News Articles.
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Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
A single dose of a highly diluted VSV-Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine -- approximately one-millionth of what is in the vaccine being used to help control the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- remains fully protective against disease in experimentally infected monkeys, according to NIH scientists. (2019-10-18)
Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks
Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
Researchers uncover novel virus type that may shed light on viral evolution
Viruses are non-living creatures, consisting of genetic material encased in a protein coat. (2019-10-16)
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. (2019-10-16)
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease (2019-10-15)
Increased risk of tularemia as the climate changes
Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method for statistically predicting impacts of climate change on outbreaks of tularemia in humans. (2019-10-15)
Public reporting on aortic valve surgeries has decreased access, study finds
Public reporting on aortic valve replacement outcomes has resulted in fewer valve surgeries for people with endocarditis, a new study has found. (2019-10-11)
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)
Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions
A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2019-10-04)
Analysis of HIV-1B in Indonesia illuminates transmission dynamics of the virus
Research into the molecular phylogeny (evolutionary history) of the HIV-1B virus in Indonesia has succeeded in illuminating the transmission period and routes for three clades (main branches of the virus). (2019-10-03)
Preaching the benefits of vaccination in an increasingly skeptical world
The jam-packed schedule for IDWeek2019 includes presentations about vaccines and other therapies that are effective against infectious diseases, new research insights about emerging infections and updates about global outbreaks past and present, such as measles and Zika. (2019-10-02)
Protozoans and pathogens make for an infectious mix
The new observation that strains of V. cholerae can be expelled into the environment after being ingested by protozoa, and that these bacteria are then primed for colonisation and infection in humans, could help explain why cholera is so persistent in aquatic environments. (2019-10-01)
Emerging parasitic disease mimics the symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis in people
A new study suggests that transmission of a protozoan parasite from insects may also cause leishmaniasis-like symptoms in people. (2019-10-01)
Why multipartite viruses infect plants rather than animals
Being in between living and non-living, viruses are, in general, strange. (2019-10-01)
Delivery system can make RNA vaccines more powerful
MIT chemical engineers have developed a new type of lipid nanoparticle that can be used to deliver RNA vaccines. (2019-09-30)
For hospitalized patients with fungal infections, specialists save lives
Fungal bloodstream infections are responsible for the deaths of more than 10,000 people every year. (2019-09-25)
Many patients not receiving first-line treatment for sinus, throat, ear infections
Investigators have now shown that only half of patients presenting with sinus, throat, or ear infections at different treatment centers received the recommended first-line antibiotics, well below the industry standard of 80 percent. (2019-09-25)
Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do. (2019-09-23)
Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein
Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics. (2019-09-20)
New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs
A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. (2019-09-20)
Global trends in antimicrobial resistance of farm animals
From 2000 to 2018, the proportion of pathogens that infect farmyard chickens and pigs and that are also significantly resistant to antibiotics grew, a new study shows. (2019-09-19)
AI-guided robotics enable automation of complex synthetic biological molecules
This article describes a platform that combines artificial intelligence-driven synthesis planning, flow chemistry and a robotically controlled experimental platform to minimize the need for human intervention in the synthesis of small organic molecules. (2019-09-17)
Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease
Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-09-17)
Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide
In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. (2019-09-16)
Too much of a good thing: Overactive immune cells trigger inflammation
Scientists describe a previously unknown disorder of the immune system: in a distinct subset of immune cells from patients with primary immunodeficiency, cellular respiration is significantly increased. (2019-09-16)
The 'pathobiome' -- a new understanding of disease
Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans. (2019-09-12)
Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy
Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) -- ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein -- can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown. (2019-09-12)
Can a DNA construction kit replace expensive antibody medication?
Researchers at KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a technique to make sheep produce new antibodies simply by injecting the DNA building blocks. (2019-09-11)
Papillomaviruses may be able to be spread by blood
Researchers found that rabbit and mouse papillomaviruses could be transferred by blood to their respective hosts, raising the possibility that human papillomavirus (HPV) may also be transferable by blood in humans. (2019-09-11)
Research shows 80% drop in ICU bloodstream infections
Bloodstream infections acquired in UK Intensive Care Units (ICUs) reduced by 80% between 2007 and 2012, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre. (2019-09-10)
'Asexual' Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
The parasite that causes Chagas disease, which had largely been thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncovered clues hidden in its genomic code. (2019-09-10)
Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-09-09)
NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. (2019-09-09)
Allergic diseases increase the risk of adult-onset asthma
A Finnish study found that the more allergic diseases an individual has, the higher the asthma risk. (2019-09-06)
Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination
The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system. (2019-09-06)
Research warns of the far-reaching consequences of measles epidemic and failure to vaccinate
The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) 5th Vaccine Conference will hear that the risks of failing to vaccinate children may extend far beyond one specific vaccine, although currently the most urgent problem to address is the resurgence of measles. (2019-09-05)
Researchers identify biomarker to predict if someone infected with malaria will get sick
Increased p53, the well-known tumor-suppressor protein, can predict whether malaria-infected children will develop fever or other symptoms, suggests a study publishing Sept. (2019-09-03)
Mumps study shows immunity gaps among vaccinated people
Immunity against mumps virus appears insufficient in a fraction of college-aged people who were vaccinated in childhood, research from Emory and CDC indicates. (2019-09-02)
Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage
A new Cornell study, 'A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay that Integrates the Host Injury Response to Infection,' published Aug. (2019-08-29)
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