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Current Infectious Diseases News and Events

Current Infectious Diseases News and Events, Infectious Diseases News Articles.
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The top 25 medical lab tests around the world
A recent study can help governments understand which diagnostic laboratory tests are most important when developing universal health coverage systems. (2019-05-22)
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. (2019-05-21)
Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks
Several University of Georgia researchers teamed up to create a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis. (2019-05-21)
Widespread testing, treatment of Hepatitis C in US prisons improves outcomes
At current drug prices, testing all persons entering prison for Hepatitis C, treating those who have at least 12 months remaining in their sentence, and linking individuals with less than 12 months in their sentence to care upon their release would result in improved health outcomes. (2019-05-21)
New single vaccination approach to killer diseases
Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases. (2019-05-20)
Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia
Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, suffer from an additional disease called cachexia. (2019-05-20)
Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?
An aggressive new strain of sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, has turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to timber production. (2019-05-19)
Scientists capture first-ever video of body's safety test for t-cells
For the first time, immunologists have captured on video what happens when T-cells undergo a type of assassin-training program before they get unleashed in the body. (2019-05-17)
Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus
The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report NIAID-funded scientists. (2019-05-16)
A tale of two skeeters
A native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper, according to new research from biologists at Tyson Research Center, the environmental field station for Washington University in St. (2019-05-16)
Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. (2019-05-10)
HIV prevention drug can curb the epidemic for high-risk groups in India
A new study by an international research team suggests that making pre-exposure prophylaxis available to men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs in India may be a cost-effective way of curbing the HIV epidemic there. (2019-05-10)
Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance
Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development. (2019-05-09)
Nipah virus: Age and breathing difficulties increase the risk of disease spread
Nipah virus has been identified as an emerging infectious disease that may cause severe epidemics in the near future. (2019-05-08)
Challenging metabolism may help fight disease
New research by Swansea University academics has shown that harnessing metabolism at a cellular level may help to relieve or heal a range of disorders. (2019-05-07)
Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus
In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. (2019-05-07)
RIT professor develops microfluidic device to better detect Ebola virus
A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. (2019-05-03)
Researchers ready B cells for novel cell therapy
Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells -- a type of white blood cell in the immune system -- to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. (2019-05-02)
Pathogens find safe harbor deep in the gastric glands
Scientists have long tried to understand how pathogenic bacteria like Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor for stomach ulcers and cancer, survive in the harsh environment of the stomach. (2019-05-02)
Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses
The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. (2019-04-30)
Musculoskeletal conditions now second global cause of years lived with disability
Musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions, which affect the body's joints, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments, now rank as the second leading global cause of years lived with a disability, reveals an analysis of international data, published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. (2019-04-30)
Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer
Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. (2019-04-30)
Darwin can help your doctor
Taking an evolutionary view can inspire new ideas in clinical microbiology. (2019-04-29)
How the body protects itself from type 2 diabetes
A specific group of white blood cells, termed 'regulatory T cells', keeps the immune system in balance and suppresses its activity to protect the body against autoimmune diseases. (2019-04-23)
Scratching the skin primes the gut for allergic reactions to food, mouse study suggests
Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells -- immune cells involved in allergic reactions -- in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice. (2019-04-23)
In rare cases, immune system fails despite HIV suppression
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is usually effective at suppressing HIV, allowing the immune system to recover by preventing the virus from destroying CD4+ T cells. (2019-04-18)
Decline in measles vaccination is causing a preventable global resurgence of the disease
In 2000, measles was declared to be eliminated in the United States. (2019-04-18)
Forecasting contagious ideas: 'Infectivity' models accurately predict tweet lifespan
Estimating tweet infectivity from the first 50 retweets is the key to predicting whether a tweet will go viral, according to a new study published in PLOS ONE on April 17, 2019, by Li Weihua from Beihang University, China and colleagues. (2019-04-17)
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the Musculoskeletal Research Unit at the University of Bristol have identified the most important risk factors for developing severe infection after knee replacement. (2019-04-17)
2017 pneumonic plague outbreak in Madagascar characterized by scientists
Plague is an endemic disease in Madagascar. Each year there is a seasonal upsurge between September and April, especially in the Central Highlands, which stand at an elevation of more than 800m. (2019-04-16)
FIU scientists discover new arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. (2019-04-16)
A new bacteria-killing weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance
In a bid to boost the arsenal available against antibiotic resistance, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and the Universidad Polit├ęcnica de Madrid successfully programmed a bacterial genetic structure to make it capable of specifically killing multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria without also destroying bacteria that are beneficial to the body. (2019-04-15)
US and Japanese researchers identify how liver cells protect against viral attacks
Researchers in Chapel Hill, N.C., and Tokyo have discovered a mechanism by which liver cells intrinsic resistance to diverse RNA viruses is regulated. (2019-04-15)
Venezuela estimated to have had 1 million new malaria infections in 2018
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) says that final estimates for 2018 could show more than 1 million cases of malaria in Venezuela alone. (2019-04-15)
Vaccine-preventable diseases surge in crisis-hit Venezuela
Vaccine-preventable diseases have not just returned, but surged in crisis hit Venezuela, according to new research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019). (2019-04-15)
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (2019-04-15)
National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals
Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam. (2019-04-14)
Applying hand rub with three steps for 15 seconds as effective at reducing bacteria as WHO-recommended 6 steps for 30 seconds
A shortened 15-second application time and a simpler three-step technique for use of alcohol-based hand rub is as effective in reducing bacteria as the 30-second application and six-step technique recommended by WHO, and could improve hand hygiene compliance. (2019-04-14)
'Superbugs' found on many hospital patients' hands and what they touch most often
For decades, hospitals have worked to get staff to wash their hands and prevent the spread of germs. (2019-04-13)
European experts sound alarm as mosquito- and tick-borne diseases set to flourish in warmer climate
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the geographical range of vector-borne diseases such as Chikungunya, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is expanding rapidly. (2019-04-13)
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