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Current Infectious Diseases News and Events, Infectious Diseases News Articles.
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Early warning system fills in gaps in infectious disease surveillance
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health developed an infectious disease early warning system that includes areas lacking health clinics participating in infectious disease surveillance. The approach compensates for existing gaps to support better observation and prediction of the spread of an outbreak, including to areas remaining without surveillance. (2021-01-11)

Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease. (2021-01-07)

Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease. (2021-01-07)

Autoimmune diseases: similar molecular signatures in target tissues
A study conducted by Professor Decio L. Eizirik's group - ULB Center for Diabetes Research - and published in Sciences Advances shows that autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, must be studied in their entirety, taking into account not only the immune system but also the target tissues. Indeed, the key mechanisms induced by inflammation, potentially shared between type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, could generate similar molecular signatures at the target tissue level. (2021-01-07)

A new approach to study autoimmune diseases
A team of researchers led by the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute Diabetes Center's Scientific Director Decio L. Eizirik, MD, PhD, has found that identifying new treatments for autoimmune diseases requires studying together the immune system AND target tissues. This study, ''Gene expression signatures of target tissues in type 1 diabetes, lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis,'' is featured in the Jan. 6, 2021, edition of Science Advances. (2021-01-06)

Sustained cellular immune dysregulation in individuals recovering from COVID-19
Ongoing observational clinical research has become a priority to better understand how the COVID-19 virus acts, and findings from this research can better inform treatment and vaccine design. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have now reported their observational study, ''Sustained cellular immune dysregulation in individuals recovering from SARS-CoV-2 infection,'' published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2020-12-29)

Trade in wild animals is thriving online, despite risk of disease transmission
Despite COVID-19 restrictions and the risk of animal to human disease transmission, illegal wildlife trade on social media networks has continued, with wild animals sometimes sold as 'lockdown pets'. (2020-12-22)

Secondary bloodstream infections associated with severe COVID-19
People with severe COVID-19 and a secondary blood infection were significantly sicker upon hospital admission, had longer hospital stays and poorer outcomes, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-22)

Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population. (2020-12-21)

Learning from three centuries of smallpox epidemics in London, UK
The current COVID-19 pandemic has caused a surge of interest in the study of infectious disease transmission, and how control measures could change the course of the pandemic. New research published on 21st December 2020, in the open access journal PLOS Biology, authored by Olga Krylova of the Canadian Institute for Health Information and David Earn of McMaster University, examines the history of recorded smallpox epidemics in London. (2020-12-21)

Researchers track and analyze smallpox epidemics over three centuries
Researchers from McMaster University have studied and analyzed thousands of weekly records documenting the deaths of smallpox victims in London, England over the span of nearly 300 years. The analysis provides new and rare insights into the ecology of infectious disease, establishing that the time between epidemics, the size of the outbreaks, and even the season when the epidemics occurred, changed over the centuries. (2020-12-21)

Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people. The caution comes from a study in PNAS in which scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the virus from the upper respiratory tract. RESTV can infect humans but isn't known to cause disease. Now the scientists express concern that pigs could serve as an ''interim or amplifying host for ebolaviruses.'' (2020-12-21)

Wildfire smoke carry microbes that can cause infectious diseases
Wildfire smoke contains microbes, infectious agents that might cause diseases. In a perspective piece published in Science, researchers at UC Davis Health and the University of Idaho proposed a multidisciplinary approach to study the health impacts of microbes carried by wildfire smokes. (2020-12-17)

TGen identifies gene that could explain disparity in COVID-19 effects
TGen identified a genetic target that could help explain the tremendous variation in how sick those infected with COVID-19 become. Led by Nicholas Schork, Ph.D., Director of TGen's Quantitative Medicine and Systems Biology Division, researchers identified miR1307 by comparing the genetic elements of SARS-Cov-2 with seven other human coronaviruses, and the genomes of coronavirus strains known to infect bats, pigs, pangolins, ferrets, civets and chickens. (2020-12-16)

Physicians say non-contact infrared thermometers fall short as COVID-19 screeners
While a fever is one of the most common symptoms for people who get sick with COVID-19, taking one's temperature is a poor means of screening who is infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease, and more importantly, who might be contagious. (2020-12-15)

Study suggests reporting of sexually transmitted infections may be impacted by COVID-19
With the health care community heavily focused on COVID-19 since the first quarter of 2020, there have been concerns that reporting of other diseases -- and the resulting data that enables them to be more effectively treated and controlled -- may have been impacted. For example, little is known about how the pandemic may have affected the reporting of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2020-12-15)

Scientists solve 100-year-old cerebral malaria mystery using neuroimaging techniques
Scientists have shown for the first time that cerebral malaria causes death in adults by triggering oxygen-deprivation in the brain, in new research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Already available treatments, such as hypothermia, may slow brain oxygen-deprivation in cerebral malaria patients. The researchers say these neuronal survival-enhancing approaches could soon be trialled in adults with cerebral malaria, alongside existing anti-malarial treatments, to hopefully improve survival. (2020-12-15)

New report finds global health research infrastructure imperiled by COVID-19
A new report released today from the non-profit Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC) finds that The strong foundation of global health research and development (R&D) that greatly accelerated the development of COVID-19 innovations is now being weakened by pandemic pressures that are diverting funding and expertise away from other dangerous diseases and putting clinical trials and scientific endeavors around the world on indefinite hold. (2020-12-11)

Baricitinib plus Remdesivir shows promise for treating COVID-19
The combination of baricitinib, an anti-inflammatory drug, and remdesivir, an antiviral, reduced time to recovery for people hospitalized with COVID-19, according to clinical trial results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-12-11)

NUS researchers finds best combination of available therapies against COVID-19
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have utilised a ground-breaking AI platform to find an optimal combination of available therapies against COVID-19. The research team identified the drug combination from over 530,000 possibilities within two weeks, cutting down the number of tests typically needed by hundreds of thousands. (2020-12-10)

Deadly, emergent cancer becoming endemic in Tasmanian devils, reducing extinction threat
An emergent transmissible cancer that once threatened Tasmanian devils with extinction appears to be transitioning to a state of endemism, researchers report. (2020-12-10)

Ability to predict C-diff mortality nearly doubled with new guidelines
Updated national guidelines for treating infections caused by the deadly superbug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) have been examined and approved by a nationally renowned C. diff researcher at University of Houston and his team of students. (2020-12-09)

Toxic pollutants can impact wildlife disease spread
Exposure to toxic pollutants associated with human activities may be influencing the spread of infectious diseases in wildlife, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (2020-12-09)

New method for evaluating vaccine safety
A research group at the University of Turku, Finland, has led the development of a new method to evaluate vaccine safety. The new method may significantly reduce the use of animal testing in the vaccine industry. (2020-12-08)

Trench fever in urban people who are homeless
A disease common during the First World War, trench fever, has been found in some urban populations experiencing homelessness in Canada, and physicians should be aware of this potentially fatal disease, highlights a practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-07)

Mailman School experts contribute to new Lancet report on health and climate change
Unless we take urgent action to tackle climate change, we can expect an ever-hotter world that threatens global health, disrupts lives and livelihoods and overwhelms healthcare systems, according to The Lancet's Global Countdown on Health and Climate Change, a comprehensive global analysis tracking the impact of climate change on human health across 41 key indicators. (2020-12-04)

Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections
Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice. The nano-sized drug delivery method successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice's lungs. The study shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19. (2020-12-03)

A new era is dawning in diagnosing sexually transmitted infections in men
Researchers and doctors from the University of Tartu and Tartu University Hospital evaluated the use of a novel revolutionary method, flow cytometry, for diagnosing urethritis in Estonian men. The study published in PLOS ONE confirmed the efficiency of the method and showed that most often urethritis was due to chlamydia. Gonorrhoea caused the strongest urethral inflammation. (2020-12-03)

Researchers developed a sequence analysis pipeline for virus discovery
A novel bioinformatics pipeline identifies both previously known and novel viruses. (2020-12-03)

Oral drug blocks SARS-CoV-2 transmission, Georgia State biomedical sciences researchers find
Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a new antiviral drug, MK-4482/EIDD-2801 or Molnupiravir, completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University have discovered. (2020-12-03)

How the vaginal microbiome may affect HIV prevention
Healthy Lactobacillus bacteria in the vagina are critical for women's health, but the accumulation of additional bacterial genera can imbalance the vaginal ecosystem. Such an imbalance may result in bacterial metabolism of drugs designed to prevent HIV infection, thereby decreasing their effectiveness and enhancing risks to women, according to a study published December 3, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Dr. Nichole Klatt of the University of Minnesota Medical School, and colleagues. (2020-12-03)

Study suggests metabolism influences parasite's resistance to drugs
New insight on how a parasite can resist current therapies has been published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2020-12-01)

Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists. The study, published in Nature Microbiology, comes about three years after the same research group developed the macaque model for CCHFV. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHFV exist. (2020-11-30)

Effect of climate change on infectious diseases unknown to half of the population
Although it is a widely known scientific fact that infectious diseases emerge and re-emerge due to climate change, a study which included the involvement of the UAB published in PlosOne reveals that 48.9% of the population surveyed are not aware of this relation. (2020-11-25)

Lung-on-chip provides new insight on body's response to early tuberculosis infection
Scientists have developed a lung-on-chip model to study how the body responds to early tuberculosis (TB) infection, according to findings published today in eLife. (2020-11-24)

Global warming likely to increase disease risk for animals worldwide
Changes in climate can increase infectious disease risk in animals, researchers found -- with the possibility that these diseases could spread to humans, they warn. (2020-11-23)

Understanding dangerous droplet dynamics
New fluid dynamics research reveals why social distancing alone doesn't necessarily prevent infection indoors and how to detect COVID-19 super-spreaders. (2020-11-23)

Potential new target to combat inflammatory diseases
An international team of researchers have uncovered a drug-like compound that blocks a crucial inflammatory pathway, potentially paving the way for a new treatment for a host of diseases - including COVID-19. WEHI's Associate Professor Seth Masters and his research team discovered the compound could prevent up-regulation of CD14, a key inflammatory protein. The discovery was recently published in EBioMedicine. (2020-11-19)

Researchers peer inside deadly pathogen's burglary kit
The bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease tularemia is a lean, mean infecting machine. It carries a relatively small genome, and a unique set of infectious tools, including a collection of chromosomal genes called 'the pathogenicity island.' Structural insights from Cryo-EM microscopy, appearing Nov. 19 in Molecular Cell, point to a way in which the bacterium's unique infectious machinery might be blocked. (2020-11-19)

Climate warming increases infectious disease risk in cooler-climate species
Accelerated climate warming may increase the risk for infectious disease outbreaks in many species adapted to mild and cooler climates, whereas species from warmer climates could experience reductions in disease risk, reports a new study. (2020-11-19)

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