Current Insecticide News and Events

Current Insecticide News and Events, Insecticide News Articles.
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Plant-based magnetic nanoparticles with antifungal properties
A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University obtained magnetic nanoparticles using sweet flag (Acorus calamus). Both the roots and the leaves of this plant have antioxidant, antimicrobial, and insecticide properties. (2021-02-10)

Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study. The results have been published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters. (2021-02-03)

Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

Common pesticides stop bees and flies from getting a good night's sleep
Just like us, many insects need a decent night's sleep to function properly, but this might not be possible if they have been exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides, the most common form of insecticide used worldwide, suggests research by academics at the University of Bristol. (2021-01-21)

Multiple mosquito blood meals accelerate malaria transmission
Multiple bouts of blood feeding by mosquitoes shorten the incubation period for malaria parasites and increase malaria transmission potential, according to a study published Dec. 31 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Lauren Childs of Virginia Tech, Flaminia Catteruccia of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and colleagues. (2020-12-31)

TPU chemists convert plastic bottle waste into insecticide sorbent
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University proposed a method to create a sorbent for imidacloprid insecticide removal from water. The sorbent belongs to metal-organic frameworks, a class of non-conventional materials. The TPU chemists grew such a framework right on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) used to produce regular plastic bottles. The method is quite simple and allows converting used materials into a useful product. The research findings are published in Applied Materials Today academic journal (IF: 8,352; Q1). (2020-12-23)

Bermudagrass versus the armyworm
The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is particularly destructive to warm-season turfgrass species, including bermudagrass, a widely popular turfgrass predominantly used of golf courses, athletic grounds, and ornamental landscapes across the country and throughout the world. (2020-12-15)

Risk of vine-to-vine spread of Xylella fastidiosa is greatest in July and August
'Managing the spread of X. fastidiosa is challenging due to a lack of field data on seasonal changes in vector abundance, proportion of vector population carrying the pathogen, and probability of acquisition from infected plants,' explained Mark Sisterson, a vector entomologist with the Agricultural Research Service-USDA. (2020-12-07)

Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey thanks to a simple new method. (2020-11-24)

Young asymptomatic 'super spreaders' keep malaria viable by infecting local mosquitoes
The new findings, reported today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), reveal a hidden reservoir that's a barrier to long-term efforts to eliminate malaria and an immediate threat for disease resurgence if control measures like bednets and indoor spraying falter. (2020-11-18)

The ecology of crop pests
Ecological theory provides insights on pesticide use in agriculture (2020-11-09)

Fipronil, a common insecticide, disrupts aquatic communities in the U.S.
The research team found a common insecticide, fipronil, and related compounds were more toxic to stream communities than previous research has found. (2020-10-23)

In pursuit of alternative pesticides
Controlling crop pests is a key element of agriculture worldwide, but the environmental impact of insecticides is a growing concern. Farmers have historically relied on the broad-spectrum chlorpyrifos, which is facing a potential ban in the U.S. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how scientists are working to develop safer alternatives to chlorpyrifos. (2020-10-21)

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (2020-10-12)

Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring. (2020-10-06)

Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects. That is according to a new analysis from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-09-29)

Insect Armageddon: low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
Joint research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population. (2020-09-28)

Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study. (2020-08-28)

Reduce insecticide spraying by using ant pheromones to catch crop pests
Scientists at Bath have developed a molecular sponge that soaks up the pheromones of ants and releases them slowly to attract the pests to an insecticide trap. (2020-08-27)

New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Exposure to imidacloprid, an agricultural insecticide, at environmentally-relevant concentrations in food or water, leaves both crustaceans and molluscs vulnerable to insecticides, weakening their immune system and leaving them susceptible to disease. (2020-08-24)

Study explores the association of malaria, HIV with anemia during pregnancy
Pregnant women from sub-Saharan Africa with malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a higher prevalence of anemia than pregnant women without infections, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings may have implications for reducing the risk of death in pregnant women and preventing low birth weights and neurocognitive impairment in their children as a result of anemia. (2020-08-14)

The mystery of the less deadly mosquito nets
Research published in Nature Communications shows that insecticide-treated mosquito nets, the mainstay in the global battle against malaria, are not providing the protection they once did - and scientists say that's a cause for serious concern in tropical and subtropical countries around the globe. (2020-07-28)

Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants
Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. The team developed two approaches to control the functions of plant proteins related to the transport of hydrophobic pollutants. These findings will lead to these new functions of pesticides being utilized in agriculture, enabling safer crops to be produced. (2020-07-27)

Volcanic glass spray shows promise in controlling mosquitoes
An indoor residual spray made by combining a type of volcanic glass with water showed effective control of mosquitoes that carry malaria, according to a new study. The findings could be useful in reducing disease-carrying mosquito populations - and the risk of malaria - in Africa. (2020-06-05)

Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. As a result, mosquitos have been shifting their biting times to earlier in the evening and later in the morning. In a new study, an international team of researchers has found that mosquitoes are most likely to transmit malaria in the early evening, when people are exposed, then at midnight, when people are protected by bed nets, or in the morning. (2020-05-04)

A step closer to eradicating malaria
Strategies that treat households in the broad vicinity of a recent malaria case with anti-malarial drugs, insecticides, or both could significantly reduce malaria in low-transmission settings. (2020-04-29)

Unique Namibian trial finds smart interventions reduce malaria transmission by 75%
A trial by scientists at the Wits Research Institute for Malaria (WRIM), in collaboration with Namibian, UK, and US researchers demonstrates how mass drug administration and vector control can help eliminate malaria. A vector refers to an organism that transmits infection, as mosquitos infected with parasites transmit malaria to people. (2020-04-27)

Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. Supporters long touted increased yields and reduced pesticides to justify its pickup. But that argument does not hold up under the first long-term study of Bt cotton impacts in India. The analysis is co-authored by a Washington University in St. Louis anthropologist in the journal Nature Plants. (2020-03-13)

The dangers facing fireflies
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-02-24)

Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons
Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin. (2020-01-29)

Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees
Researchers discover that neonicotinoid seed treatments are driving a dramatic increase in insecticide toxicity in U.S. agricultural landscapes, despite evidence that these treatments have little to no benefit in many crops. (2020-01-21)

Researchers identify that mosquitoes can sense toxins through their legs
Researchers at LSTM have identified a completely new mechanism by which mosquitoes that carry malaria are becoming resistant to insecticide. (2019-12-25)

For controlling tsetse flies, fabric color matters
This week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, researchers report that they have engineered an improved colored fabric for the insecticide-treated targets used to control tsetse, based on an understanding of how flies see color. (2019-12-12)

Scientist identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes
Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance. (2019-12-05)

How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £2.5 million project
The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease in both dogs and humans. Insecticide-impregnated dog collars and dog culling are used in Brazil but instead, researchers used a 'lure to kill' method by attracting female flies towards insecticide using the male pheromome. This reduced female sandflies by 49% compared with 43% for the insecticide-only collar. (2019-12-05)

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers
The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that can be safely delivered via a bednet. (2019-12-02)

novel bednet design improves safety, affordability and lethality to resistant mosquitoes
Researchers from LSTM have designed a new bednet that can kill mosquitoes more efficiently than existing nets, in a way that increases the choice of insecticide used, while minimising risk to the person inside the bednet. (2019-12-02)

The use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees, new study finds
Not all neonicotinoid insecticides have negative effects on bees, according to researchers at Lund University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Their new study indicates that the use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees and pollination. (2019-11-27)

New chemical treatment for bed nets could prevent more infections by overcoming mosquito resistance
With insecticide resistance eroding the life-saving power of bed nets -- a major malaria-fighting tool -- researchers reported today that in a clinical trial that involved distributing millions of treated nets to households across Uganda, far fewer children showed evidence of malaria parasites after sleeping under nets newly formulated to disarm a mosquito's key resistance mechanisms. (2019-11-21)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

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