Current Insecticides News and Events

Current Insecticides News and Events, Insecticides News Articles.
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Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study. The results have been published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters. (2021-02-03)

Synthesizing valuable chemicals from contaminated soil
Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and ETH Zurich have developed a process to produce commodity chemicals in a much less hazardous way than was previously possible. In the current issue of Science, the researchers report that they have been able to utilize electrolysis, i.e., the application of an electric current, to obtain chemicals known as dichloro and dibromo compounds, which can then be used to synthesize commodity chemicals. (2021-01-29)

Deeper insight into how tick spit suppresses cattle immunity
A tick saliva study reveals immune responses that could lead to better protection for cattle. (2021-01-28)

Genetically-modified mosquitoes key to stopping Zika virus spread
In 2016, the World Health Organization called the Zika virus epidemic a ''public health emergency of international concern'' due to the virus causing birth defects for pregnant women in addition to neurological problems. (2021-01-26)

Drug to treat rare genetic disease may help control transmission of African Trypanosomiasis
African trypanosomiasis (also known as sleeping sickness) is a disease transmitted by tsetse flies and is fatal to humans and other animals; however, there is currently no vaccine, this disease is mainly controlled by reducing insect populations and patient treatment. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Alvaro Acosta-Serrano at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and an international team of researchers suggests that the approved drug nitisinone could be repurposed to kill tsetse flies without harming important pollinator insects. (2021-01-26)

Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

Common pesticides stop bees and flies from getting a good night's sleep
Just like us, many insects need a decent night's sleep to function properly, but this might not be possible if they have been exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides, the most common form of insecticide used worldwide, suggests research by academics at the University of Bristol. (2021-01-21)

Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia. (2021-01-15)

Bermudagrass versus the armyworm
The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is particularly destructive to warm-season turfgrass species, including bermudagrass, a widely popular turfgrass predominantly used of golf courses, athletic grounds, and ornamental landscapes across the country and throughout the world. (2020-12-15)

In pursuit of alternative pesticides
Controlling crop pests is a key element of agriculture worldwide, but the environmental impact of insecticides is a growing concern. Farmers have historically relied on the broad-spectrum chlorpyrifos, which is facing a potential ban in the U.S. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how scientists are working to develop safer alternatives to chlorpyrifos. (2020-10-21)

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (2020-10-12)

Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that the combined threats reduced blue orchard bee reproduction by 57 percent and resulted in fewer female offspring. (2020-10-06)

Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects. That is according to a new analysis from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-09-29)

Insect Armageddon: low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
Joint research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population. (2020-09-28)

Researchers warn of food-web threats from common insecticides
In an opinion in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from North Carolina State University and Pennsylvania State University argued for curbing the use of neonicotinoid insecticides. (2020-09-02)

Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study. (2020-08-28)

'Insect apocalypse' may not be happening in US
Scientists have been warning about an 'insect apocalypse' in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas -- particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative of what's happening to insects on a larger scale. (2020-08-11)

Cell death in porpoises caused by environmental pollutants
Environmental pollutants threaten the health of marine mammals. This study established a novel cell-based assay using the fibroblasts of a finless porpoise stranded along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, to better understand the cytotoxicity and the impacts of environmental pollutants on the porpoise population. The results revealed that the concentrations of PCBs and DDTs which accumulated in the porpoise are likely to have an adverse effect at the cellular level. (2020-07-20)

Returning to farming's roots in the battle against the 'billion-dollar beetle'
A new study from University of Arizona entomologists reaffirms the importance of crop rotation and diversification in combating the western corn rootworm's resistance to biotech crops. (2020-07-20)

Treatments tested for invasive pest on allium crops
A Cornell University-led team of researchers field-tested 14 active ingredients in insecticides, applied in a variety of methods, to understand the best treatment options against the Allium leafminer, a growing threat to onions, garlic and leeks. (2020-07-01)

Volcanic glass spray shows promise in controlling mosquitoes
An indoor residual spray made by combining a type of volcanic glass with water showed effective control of mosquitoes that carry malaria, according to a new study. The findings could be useful in reducing disease-carrying mosquito populations - and the risk of malaria - in Africa. (2020-06-05)

Bangladeshi eggplant farmers reap rewards via genetics
Farmers in Bangladesh achieved significantly higher yields and revenues by growing insect-resistant, genetically engineered eggplant, a new Cornell study has found. (2020-05-29)

Harnessing psyllid peptides to fight citrus greening disease
BTI, USDA and UW scientists have identified peptides in the Asian citrus psyllid, an insect that spreads the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB). The researchers are using the peptides as starting points for developing an insecticide to halt damage to the U.S.'s multi-billion dollar citrus industry. (2020-04-28)

Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. Supporters long touted increased yields and reduced pesticides to justify its pickup. But that argument does not hold up under the first long-term study of Bt cotton impacts in India. The analysis is co-authored by a Washington University in St. Louis anthropologist in the journal Nature Plants. (2020-03-13)

How pest management strategies affect the bottom line
Concern regarding impacts of pesticides on the environment and human health has led to the development of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. A component of these programs involves the use of observation of pest populations in the field to direct timing of pesticide applications. Central to the concept of IPM is the use of an economic threshold of a population level where an application of a pesticide is advisable. (2020-02-28)

EPA fails to follow landmark law to protect children from pesticides in food
The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children's health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. But an investigation by EWG, published this week in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, found that the EPA has failed to add the mandated children's health safety factor to the allowable limits for almost 90 percent of the most common pesticides. (2020-02-12)

Lights out? Fireflies face extinction threats of habitat loss, light pollution, pesticides
Habitat loss, pesticide use and, surprisingly, artificial light are the three most serious threats endangering fireflies across the globe, raising the specter of extinction for certain species whose features render them more vulnerable to specific threats. Impacts range from loss of biodiversity to ecotourism. The authors, compiling the knowledge of experts around the globe, will use the study to focus conservation efforts. (2020-02-03)

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds
For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's cells -- not by S. sessilifolia itself. (2020-01-29)

'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace
The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries. CABI teamed up with colleagues from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Plant Protection and Regulatory Services Directorate in Ghana to conduct research which is another step closer to finding more biological control options to fight the FAW. (2020-01-27)

A roadmap for adding ivermectin to the malaria toolbox
A group of experts led by Regina Rabinovich and Carlos Chaccour from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has published a roadmap to evaluate -- and subsequently implement -- ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool against malaria. The Ivermectin Roadmap, published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, includes a foreword signed by Nobel laureate William C. Campbell, co-discoverer of the drug. (2020-01-22)

Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees
Researchers discover that neonicotinoid seed treatments are driving a dramatic increase in insecticide toxicity in U.S. agricultural landscapes, despite evidence that these treatments have little to no benefit in many crops. (2020-01-21)

Time for a closer look at Pyrethroid insecticides
Columbia professors offer their perspective on a recent study on Pyrethroid, among the most widely used insecticides for public health control of vector-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus. While the insecticides are generally regarded as posing low health risks to humans in ordinary exposure situations, results show a 50 percent increase in total mortality and three-fold increase in heart disease deaths in persons with high urinary levels of 3-PBA. This unexpected finding merits urgent follow-up. (2020-01-03)

Researchers identify that mosquitoes can sense toxins through their legs
Researchers at LSTM have identified a completely new mechanism by which mosquitoes that carry malaria are becoming resistant to insecticide. (2019-12-25)

Scientist identify new marker for insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes
Researchers at LSTM have genetically modified malaria carrying mosquitoes in order to demonstrate the role of particular genes in conferring insecticide resistance. (2019-12-05)

Malaria deaths could be reduced thanks to Warwick engineers
The resurgence of Malaria in high risk areas calls for new methods to combat the potentially dangerous situation. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Warwick and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have found adding a barrier above a bednet can significantly improve the bednet's performance, reduce the quantity of insecticide while expanding the range of insecticides that can be safely delivered via a bednet. (2019-12-02)

novel bednet design improves safety, affordability and lethality to resistant mosquitoes
Researchers from LSTM have designed a new bednet that can kill mosquitoes more efficiently than existing nets, in a way that increases the choice of insecticide used, while minimising risk to the person inside the bednet. (2019-12-02)

On balance, some neonicotinoid pesticides could benefit bees
The story of neonicotinoids is growing more nuanced. Europe has banned outdoor use of three of these insecticides to protect bee populations. Two other neonicotinoids are still permitted, but little is known about their impact on bees. New research reported in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology on one of the permitted neonicotinoids indicates it effectively controls pests and might even help bees. (2019-11-27)

The use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees, new study finds
Not all neonicotinoid insecticides have negative effects on bees, according to researchers at Lund University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Their new study indicates that the use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees and pollination. (2019-11-27)

Neonicotinoids: Despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Since 2013, a European Union moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years. (2019-11-27)

New chemical treatment for bed nets could prevent more infections by overcoming mosquito resistance
With insecticide resistance eroding the life-saving power of bed nets -- a major malaria-fighting tool -- researchers reported today that in a clinical trial that involved distributing millions of treated nets to households across Uganda, far fewer children showed evidence of malaria parasites after sleeping under nets newly formulated to disarm a mosquito's key resistance mechanisms. (2019-11-21)

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