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Current Insects News and Events, Insects News Articles.
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City lights setting traps for migrating birds
A University of Delaware study has examined how light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migration, a trend that poses risk for the fowl that often fly into buildings and has increased with the addition of brighter LED lights. (2018-01-19)
Clockwork under the microscope
Circadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee. (2018-01-16)
UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes
Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges. (2018-01-11)
In 'pond scum,' scientists find answers to one evolution's which-came-first cases
A team of scientists report on new evidence that primitive moths and butterflies existed during the Jurassic period, approximately 50 million years earlier than the first flowering plants, shedding new light on one of the most confounding cases of co-evolution. (2018-01-10)
University of Montana publishes research on unusual gene evolution in bacteria
University of Montana researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet -- this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth. (2018-01-05)
Genetic changes help mosquitoes survive pesticide attacks
The fascinating array of genetic changes that confer pesticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is reviewed in an article published today in Trends in Parasitology. (2018-01-02)
Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)
Plant defense following the iron-maiden principle
Calcium phosphate is a typical component of teeth. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mineral in their „teeth (2017-12-20)
Night-flyers or day-trippers? Study sheds light on when moths, butterflies are active
Butterflies fly during the day while moths travel at night - or so you might think. (2017-12-12)
Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. (2017-12-08)
Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes
A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2017-12-07)
Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences. (2017-12-05)
Chance record of an annual mass emergence of enigmatic mantis-flies
Being neither mantids nor flies, the peculiar mantis-flies are in fact predatory lacewings which use their mantis-like forelegs to catch prey. (2017-12-04)
Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives
Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University, have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates. (2017-12-04)
Invasive frogs give invasive birds a boost in Hawaii
Puerto Rican coqui frogs were accidentally introduced to Hawaii in the 1980s, and today there are as many as 91,000 frogs per hectare in some locations. (2017-11-29)
Laws of attraction: Pollinators use multiple cues to identify flowers across continents
Although at least 75 percent of our crop species depend on animal pollinators, little is known about their flower preferences. (2017-11-27)
Desert ants cannot be fooled
Cataglyphis fortis desert ants can learn visual or olfactory cues to pinpoint their nest, but only if these cues are unique to specify the nest entrance. (2017-11-22)
Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
Researchers at Michigan State University's entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. (2017-11-21)
The strange case of the scuba-diving fly
How a species of fly subverted nature to forage in a caustic underwater habitat. (2017-11-20)
Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds
Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds, according to new research from Project Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science). (2017-11-14)
Making mosquitoes self-destruct
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have developed transgenic mosquitoes that stably express the Cas9 enzyme in their germline. (2017-11-14)
In bee decline, fungicides emerge as improbable villain
When a Cornell-led team of scientists analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range contractions, they expected to find stressors like changes in land use, geography or insecticides. (2017-11-14)
Flower attracts insects by pretending to be a mushroom
The mysterious flowers of Aspidistra elatior are found on the southern Japanese island of Kuroshima. (2017-11-14)
How to manage forest pests in the Anthropocene? Bring theory.
A survivor's guide to why forests around the world are being impacted by invasive pests and what can be done about it in an era of overwhelming human activity and climate change. (2017-11-13)
Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with us
Humans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. (2017-11-10)
Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. (2017-11-10)
Size matters: How thrips choose their partners
The bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate -- this applies, at least, to thrips, insects that are hard to recognise with the naked eye. (2017-11-08)
Digger wasps and their chemistry
Astonishing evolution: Because digger wasps switched prey, the chemical protective layer of their skin changed, too. (2017-11-03)
Research shows how environment plays key role in changing movement behavior of animals
University of Leicester mathematicians develop theory which helps to unravel long-standing mysteries of animal movement. (2017-10-30)
Spider silk could be used to power microphones in hearing aids, cell phones
Would you want a spider web inside your ear? Probably not. (2017-10-30)
Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cells
A scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, explained frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis -- development of organisms from unfertilized egg cells -- in insects. (2017-10-26)
Invasive species jeopardize already threatened island animals
Researchers have identified which of the approximately 465,000 islands worldwide are home to both highly threatened terrestrial vertebrates and invasive species that may endanger their survival. (2017-10-25)
Waterside lighting drastically disrupts wildlife in the surrounding ecosystem
Researchers in Germany find that streetlights near waterways attract flying insects from the water and change the predator community living in the grass beneath the lights. (2017-10-20)
Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction
Interactions between species play a key role in shaping biodiversity. (2017-10-18)
Three-quarters of the total insect population lost in protected nature reserves
Since 1989, in 63 nature reserves in Germany the total biomass of flying insects has decreased by more than 75 percent. (2017-10-18)
How well-fed mosquitoes outwit victims at take-off
Well fed mosquitoes need to make a stealthy get away to avoid attracting the attention of the victim upon which they have just gorged, and now an international team of scientists have shown that mosquitoes take advantage of their long legs and a wing assisted launch to evade detection. (2017-10-18)
A mosquito's secret weapon: a light touch and strong wings
How do mosquitoes land and take off without our noticing? (2017-10-18)
Tropical beetles face extinction threat
Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists. (2017-10-17)
Invasive ladybird species threatens other ladybirds in England
The harlequin ladybird, officially known as Harmonia axyridis, was widely introduced across continental Europe to limit the population of pest insects. (2017-10-16)
New way to prevent genetically engineered and unaltered organisms from producing offspring
A major obstacle to applying genetic engineering to benefit humans and the environment is the risk that organisms whose genes have been altered might produce offspring with their natural counterparts, releasing the novel genes into the wild. (2017-10-12)
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