Nav: Home

Current Insects News and Events | Page 2

Current Insects News and Events, Insects News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. (2019-02-14)
Tracking pollen with quantum dots
Most plant species on earth are reliant on insects for pollination, including more than 30% of the food crops we eat. (2019-02-14)
From vibrations alone, acacia ants can tell nibbles from the wind
Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Feb. 14 find that the ants of the acacia tree are tipped off to the presence of herbivores by vibrations that run throughout the trees when an animal gets too close or begins to chew. (2019-02-14)
No stink bugs allowed: Study shows size of gaps needed for invasion
If a structure has a gap or entrance large enough for brown marmorated stink bugs to fit through, they will find it. (2019-02-13)
Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago
The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually. (2019-02-11)
DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. (2019-02-08)
How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects
With bright reds and yellows -- and even the occasional white -- poppies are very bright and colorful. (2019-02-08)
You are what you eat: A color-changing insect modifies diet to become distasteful
When young spotted lanternflies grow they become brightly red. Around this time, they also begin to feed almost exclusively on the tree of heaven, from which they suck bitter juices into their bodies. (2019-02-08)
Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyoming
The 'perching birds,' or passerines, are the most common birds in the world today -- they include sparrows, robins, and finches. (2019-02-07)
Who's listening? Mosquitos can hear up to 10 meters away
Mosquitoes can hear over distances much greater than anyone suspected, according to researchers at Cornell and Binghamton University. (2019-02-07)
When does noise become a meaningful message?
Background noise is usually regarded as a nuisance that masks important sounds. (2019-02-06)
OU study finds insects crave salt and search grasslands for the limiting nutrient
A University of Oklahoma team from the Geographical Ecology Group has published a new study in the journal Ecology on the nutritional preferences of diverse insect communities from Texas to Minnesota. (2019-02-06)
Where do the best strawberries grow?
Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. (2019-02-04)
Microbes hitched to insects provide a rich source of new antibiotics
In an exhaustive search of microbes from more than 1,400 insects collected from diverse environments across North and South America, a UW-Madison research team found that insect-borne microbes often outperformed soil bacteria in stopping some of the most common and dangerous antibiotic-resistant pathogens. (2019-02-01)
New study shows how vegans, vegetarians and omnivores feel about eating insects
Many non-vegan vegetarians and omnivores are open to including insects in their diet. (2019-01-30)
Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects
A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites. (2019-01-17)
Let's prepare now so farming insects as food is environmentally friendly, say scientists
As whole-roasted crickets gain traction as a protein-rich snack and restaurants experiment with mealworms on the menu, there's still 'an overwhelming lack of knowledge' concerning the ecological sustainability of the emerging, multi-million-dollar insects-as-food industry, say researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. (2019-01-14)
Wild insects 'get old' before they die
Short-lived wild insects 'get old' -- losing some of their physical abilities -- before they die, new research shows. (2019-01-14)
Artificial bug eyes
Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. (2019-01-09)
New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics
Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, researchers have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. (2019-01-08)
How locusts switch colours in different settings
Scientists have discovered how locusts change their body colour to adapt to different environments, according to new research published in eLife. (2019-01-08)
Mosquito-specific protein may lead to safer insecticides
A protein required for development of mosquito eggs may provide a mosquito-selective target for insecticide development, according to a new study publishing on Jan. (2019-01-08)
Bee mite arrival in Hawaii causes pathogen changes in honeybee predators
A team led by entomologists at the University of California, Riverside, performed a study on the Big Island and found viruses associated with the varroa mite, a parasite of honeybees, have spilled over into the western yellowjacket, a honeybee predator and honey raider. (2019-01-08)
Researchers locate the body's largest cell receptor
A giant toadstool that swallow up vitamins and nutrients in the intestines and kidneys. (2019-01-03)
Newborn insects trapped in amber show first evidence of how to crack an egg
Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology. (2018-12-20)
Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves
All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. (2018-12-20)
Stick insects: Egg-laying techniques reveal new evolutionary map
Scientists have created the best map of stick-insect evolution to date by combining DNA analysis and knowledge of their varied egg-laying techniques. (2018-12-19)
Scientists discover over 450 fossilized millipedes in 100-million-year-old amber
Over 450 millipedes, fossilized in 100-million-year-old Burmese amber, were recently discovered by a research team from the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig - Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity. (2018-12-19)
Three generations, 1,000s of miles: Scientists unlock mystery of a dragonfly's migration
New research describes the annual life cycle of the common green darner dragonfly, finding that it takes three generations and two long-distance migrations to complete one year in the life of this species. (2018-12-18)
Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet
Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. (2018-12-13)
College textbooks largely overlook the most common animals
A recent study of textbooks aimed at introductory biology courses finds that they devote less than one percent of their text to discussing insects, which make up more than 60 percent of animal species. (2018-12-12)
Fallen through the net?
Using long-term data from the ''Butterfly Monitoring Germany'' citizens' research project, scientists have now investigated the matter using butterflies as an example. (2018-12-12)
Researchers create first sensor package that can ride aboard bees
Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. (2018-12-12)
'Pest-controlling' bats could help save rainforests
A new study shows that several species of bats are giving Madagascar's rice farmers a vital pest control service by feasting on plagues of insects. (2018-12-11)
New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian
More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants. (2018-12-05)
Effort clarifies major branch of insect tree of life
The insects known as Hemiptera are not a particularly glamorous bunch. (2018-11-26)
Blood-sucking flies have been spreading malaria for 100 million years
The microorganisms that cause malaria, leishmaniasis and a variety of other illnesses today can be traced back at least to the time of dinosaurs, a study of amber-preserved blood-sucking insects and ticks show. (2018-11-26)
Transparent fruit flies
A new kind of microscope has been developed in Vienna: it creates 2D light sheets, penetrating biological tissues and causing special molecules to fluoresce. (2018-11-22)
The engineering work of ants can influence palaeoclimatic studies
The palaeontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. (2018-11-16)
What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?
In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse -- the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. (2018-11-15)
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".