Current Instagram News and Events

Current Instagram News and Events, Instagram News Articles.
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Children can bypass age verification procedures in popular social media apps
Children of all ages can completely bypass age verification measures to sign-up to the world's most popular social media apps including Snapchat, Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, WhatsApp, Messenger, Skype and Discord by simply lying about their age, researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software have found. (2021-01-27)

Holocaust Remembrance Day: COVID-19 changed how we remember
Educators have successfully leveraged new forms of Holocaust remembrance using social media tools. Included have been a series of memory related hashtags in use on Twitter and Facebook, ''live'' Instagram stories from memorial sites and concentration camps as well as Zoom discussions with Holocaust survivors across the globe. This transition was described by the author as particularly important because prior to Corona, many memorials objected to such means of communication out of fear that it would ''commercialize'' or even distort legitimate Holocaust memory. (2021-01-26)

Strokes after TIAs have declined over time, study shows
Patients who have transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are at risk of subsequent stroke and require longer follow-up that previously thought, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and Harvard Medical School. (2021-01-26)

Dietary adherence and the fight against obesity
While eating less and moving more are the basics of weight control and obesity treatment, finding ways to help people adhere to a weight-loss regimen is more complicated. Understanding what features make a diet easier or more challenging to follow can help optimize and tailor dietary approaches for obesity treatment. (2021-01-25)

Addressing the impact of structural racism on disparities in children with Type 1 diabetes
Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications and adverse outcomes through ongoing poor glycemic control. (2021-01-22)

Creating a safe CAR T-Cell therapy to fight solid tumors in children
Scientists modify CAR T-Cell therapy, making it more effective and less toxic, for possible use in solid tumors such as neuroblastoma. (2021-01-21)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment. (2021-01-20)

Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (2021-01-19)

New England Journal of Medicine publishes COVID-19 treatment trial results
In a multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health, a combination of two drugs, baricitinib and remdesivir, reduced time to recovery in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The results from sites including UT Health San Antonio and University Health were published Dec. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Researchers featured in Medical Research Journal for Artificial Intelligence Studies
A paper written by Arash Shaban-Nejad, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor, and Nariman Ammar, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow, both at the Center for Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research - Medical Informatics. The paper discussed how an artificial intelligence system developed by the researchers was used to diagnose and treat children and adults who suffer from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). (2021-01-05)

Neurology patients faced with rising out-of-pocket costs for tests, office visits
Just like with drug costs, the amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for diagnostic tests and office visits for neurologic conditions has risen over 15 years, according to a new study published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

People in rural areas less likely to receive specialty care for neurologic conditions
A new study has found that while the prevalence of neurologic conditions like dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS) is consistent across the U.S., the distribution of neurologists is not, and people in more rural areas may be less likely to receive specialty care for certain neurologic conditions. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology, is published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses. (2020-12-21)

Melody of an Alpine summit falling apart
The summit of the 2592 metres high Hochvogel is sliced by dangerous fracture which continues to open. It is difficult to judge when the summit might crack. Researchers at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and the TU Munich are developing a new monitoring method. Seismic sensors measure the summit's natural vibration. The pitch of the mountain changes depending on the tension in the rock allowing unique conclusions about the development of a landslide. (2020-12-21)

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha. (2020-12-17)

Labeling paid 'influencer' vaping posts as ads draws attention
Social media influencers vaping glamorously into their social media feeds are often not doing so for free. And new research suggests that calling out their pay-to-play posts as advertisements in a plain, obvious way might have an impact on young people. (2020-12-08)

Drinking blocks a chemical that promotes attention
UT Health San Antonio scientists studied the cascade of events that begins when alcohol diminishes norepinephrine release in a brain structure called the locus coeruleus. (2020-12-02)

Kidney disease leading risk factor for COVID-related hospitalization
An analysis of Geisinger's electronic health records has revealed chronic kidney disease to be the leading risk factor for hospitalization from COVID-19. (2020-12-02)

Study finds 10 metabolites associated with risk of stroke
Metabolites are small molecules found in our body's cells. They come from the food we eat, chemical processes happening within our bodies and microbes. A new analysis of recent studies has found that the levels of 10 metabolites detected in the blood are associated with a person's risk of stroke. The research is published in the December 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-02)

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents
More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals. (2020-12-01)

Study finds COVID-19 hindering US academic productivity of faculty with young children
The academic productivity of higher education faculty In the United States in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields with very young children suffered as a result of the stay-at-home orders during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan School of Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Men tuning into Insta-spiration
New research confirms men are affected by Instagram influencers who set global benchmarks for ideal body shape, fashion and even facial trends. While perhaps not as focused on 'thinness' as women appear to be from female influencers, the Flinders University study confirms males are responding to the body image and fitness messages shared by Instagram leaders, some with millions of followers. (2020-11-29)

Ireland's only dinosaurs discovered in antrim
The only dinosaur bones ever found on the island of Ireland have been formally confirmed for the first time by a team of experts from the University of Portsmouth and Queen's University Belfast, led by Dr Mike Simms, a curator and palaeontologist at National Museums NI. (2020-11-24)

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (2020-11-24)

Home health care improves COVID-19 outcomes
Survivors of COVID-19 are a vulnerable population who often have health ramifications from their illness and hospital stay. Upon returning home from acute care, large proportions of survivors experience functional dependencies, pain, dyspnea, and exhaustion. Until now, no data has been available on the outcomes of COVID-19 patients discharged home after hospitalization and their recovery needs. (2020-11-23)

Study shows delirium can signal presence of COVID-19 in asymptomatic older patients in ED
A study published today in JAMA Network Open/Emergency Medicine supports evidence that older persons admitted to emergency departments (ED), and subsequently diagnosed positive for COVID-19, often present with delirium when they show no other typical COVID-19 symptoms, such as fever and cough. (2020-11-19)

Children's Hospital Los Angeles conducts largest pediatric genomic COVID-19 study to date
Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles analyze the largest group of genetically-sequenced Sars-CoV-2 samples to date. Their findings suggest a potential link between certain mutations and disease severity. (2020-11-19)

Can facial recognition help identify congenital adrenal hyperplasia?
Investigators train computers to recognize facial features, showing promise for identifying congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a rare hormone disorder. (2020-11-18)

UTHSC researchers identify three drugs as possible therapeutics for COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center working with colleagues at the University of New Mexico have identified three drugs, already approved for other uses in humans, as possible therapeutics for COVID-19, the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-11-18)

Racial disparities in pediatric diabetes treatment
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes. (2020-11-12)

Pediatric surgeon establishes first-ever guidelines for pediatric opioid prescribing
In addition to adults, opioid addiction and misuse affects the pediatric population. Pediatric surgeon forms group of health care providers and advocates to establish first ever pediatric opioid prescribing guidelines. (2020-11-11)

Personalized cancer vaccine clinical trial to expand following promising early results
A University of Arizona Health Sciences clinical trial to study safety and effectiveness of a personalized cancer vaccine combined with immunotherapy drug Pembrolizumab will expand after promising preliminary data was presented at the Society for the Immunotherapy of Cancer's annual meeting. Researcher Julie E. Bauman, MD, MPH, reported data on the first 10 patients with head and neck cancer, seven of whom were treated at Banner - University Medicine, clinical partner for the UArizona Cancer Center. (2020-11-10)

Experts release new management strategies for malignant colorectal polyps
Early identification and removal of cancerous colorectal polyps is critical to preventing the progression of colorectal cancer and improving survival rates. The U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer has released new guidance for endoscopists on how to assess colorectal lesions for features associated with cancer, discuss how these factors guide management, and outline when to advise surgery after malignant polyp removal. (2020-11-04)

Married, single, kids or not, participating in workforce may protect women's memory
Women who work in the paid labor force in early adulthood and middle age may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay, according to a new study published in the November 4, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-11-04)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

Study raises questions about role of leisure activity in dementia
Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

Antiseizure medication in pregnancy associated with twice the risk of autism in child
Women with epilepsy who take the antiseizure drug valproic acid while pregnant are at more than double the risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder and nearly double the risk of having children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

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