Current Intelligence News and Events

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Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

"Liquid" machine-learning system adapts to changing conditions
MIT researchers developed a neural network that learns on the job, not just during training. The ''liquid'' network varies its equations' parameters, enhancing its ability to analyze time series data. The advance could boost autonomous driving, medical diagnosis, and more. (2021-01-28)

Scientists publish a blueprint to apply artificial intelligence to extend human longevity
The international team of artificial intelligence experts and medical doctors propose a framework for the application of next-generation AI to extend human longevity (2021-01-27)

AI used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia in relatives of patients
University of Alberta researchers have taken a step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest on a self-reported schizotypal personality trait scale. (2021-01-26)

Two-photon polymerization of PEGda hydrogel microstructure with low threshold power with green laser
The fabrication of shape-memory hydrogel scaffolds not only requires biocompatibility, micrometre resolution, high mechanical strength, but also requires a low polymerisation threshold in high-water content environment to incorporate microstructures with biological tissues. Towards this goal, scientists from China and australite developed a new hydrogel formula that full fills this goal and demonstrated water-responsive structures with a shape-memory effect at a micrometre scale. This work is of importance for the development future reversible microdevices in biomedical engineering. (2021-01-20)

Appreciating a flower's texture, color, and shape leads to better drone landings
A team of TU Delft and the Westphalian University of Applied Sciences researchers present an optical flow-based learning process that allows robots to estimate distances through the visual appearance (shape, color, texture) of the objects in view. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based learning strategy increases the navigation skills of small flying drones and entails a new hypothesis on insect intelligence. (2021-01-19)

Faeces and algorithms: Artificial Intelligence to map our intestinal bacteria
The intestines and their bacteria are sometimes called our 'second brain', but studying these bacteria in their natural environment is difficult. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a method that uses artificial intelligence to map intestinal bacteria using faeces. The researchers thus hope to gain more knowledge of the role played by these bacteria in various diseases. (2021-01-14)

Artificial intelligence puts focus on the life of insects
Scientists are combining artificial intelligence and advanced computer technology with biological know how to identify insects with supernatural speed. This opens up new possibilities for describing unknown species and for tracking the life of insects across space and time (2021-01-12)

When AI is used to set prices, can inadvertent collusion be a result?
CATONSVILLE, MD, January 12, 2021 - Machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are perfectly suited to help companies and marketers monitor and set prices based on real-time dynamic pricing. But new research has identified some possible unintended consequences of AI in this area. (2021-01-12)

Computer scientists: We wouldn't be able to control super intelligent machines
We are fascinated by machines that can control cars, compose symphonies, or defeat people at chess, Go, or Jeopardy! While more progress is being made all the time in Artificial Intelligence (AI), some scientists and philosophers warn of the dangers of an uncontrollable superintelligent AI. Using theoretical calculations, an international team of researchers, including scientists from the Center for Humans and Machines at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, shows that it would not be possible to control a superintelligent AI. (2021-01-11)

Machine learning accelerates discovery of materials for use in industrial processes
Research led by scientists at the University of Toronto and Northwestern University employs machine learning to craft the best building blocks in the assembly of reticular framework materials for use in a targeted application. The findings demonstrate that the use of artificial intelligence approaches can help in proposing novel materials for diverse applications such as clean energy, sensoring and biomedicine, by accelerating the design cycle for materials. (2021-01-11)

K-State medical director contributes to research behind updated CDC quarantine guidance
Kyle Goerl, the medical director of Kansas State University's Lafene Health Center, is part of a collaborative team that has published recent research on SARS-CoV-2 transmission and quarantine periods. (2021-01-11)

Scientists identify workflow algorithm to predict psychosis
Cleverly combining artificial and human intelligence leads to improved prevention of psychosis in young patients (2021-01-09)

Preserving workers' hearing health by improving earplug efficiency
How could we improve the comfort and effectiveness of these earplugs? What aspects of the ear canal must be taken into account? To answer these questions, researchers from the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS University) and the Institut de recherche en santé et sécurité du travail (IRSST) analyzed the varying structure of ear canals to find a correlation between their shapes and the effectiveness of three commonly-used models of earplugs. (2021-01-08)

Danish and Chinese tongues taste broccoli and chocolate differently
Two studies from the University of Copenhagen show that Danes aren't quite as good as Chinese at discerning bitter tastes. The research suggests that this is related to anatomical differences upon the tongues of Danish and Chinese people. (2021-01-05)

Researchers featured in Medical Research Journal for Artificial Intelligence Studies
A paper written by Arash Shaban-Nejad, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor, and Nariman Ammar, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow, both at the Center for Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research - Medical Informatics. The paper discussed how an artificial intelligence system developed by the researchers was used to diagnose and treat children and adults who suffer from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). (2021-01-05)

Using artificial intelligence to find new uses for existing medications
Scientists have developed a machine-learning method that crunches massive amounts of data to help determine which existing medications could improve outcomes in diseases for which they are not prescribed. (2021-01-04)

Artificial intelligence predicts gestational diabetes in Chinese women
Machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, can predict which women are at high risk of developing gestational diabetes and lead to earlier intervention, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-12-22)

Cancer's intelligence
Dr. J. James Frost and The International Journal of Unconventional Computing will soon be publishing 'Cancer's Intelligence' which reports that Cancer can be analyzed as an intelligent system of collaborating and computing cells. (2020-12-22)

Artificial intelligence classifies supernova explosions with unprecedented accuracy
Scientists from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian have trained machine learning software to classify supernovae without the traditional use of spectra. The project--the first to use real supernovae data to inform its artificial intelligence--is 82% accurate. Currently, scientists take spectra of 10-percent of the ~10,000 supernovae discovered each year. When the Rubin Observatory goes online, only 0.1-percent of the expected supernovae discoveries will be further studied without the new software. (2020-12-17)

Teaching artificial intelligence to adapt
Getting computers to 'think' like humans is the holy grail of artificial intelligence, but human brains turn out to be tough acts to follow. Now, Salk researchers have used a computational model of brain activity to simulate this process more accurately than ever before. The new model mimics how the brain's prefrontal cortex uses a phenomenon known as 'gating' to control the flow of information between different areas of neurons. (2020-12-16)

Accurate neural network computer vision without the 'black box'
New research by a team at Duke University offers clues to what goes on inside the minds of machines as they learn to see. Instead of attempting to account for a neural network's decision-making on a post hoc basis, their method shows how the network learns along the way, by revealing how much the network calls to mind different concepts to help decipher what it sees as the image travels through successive layers. (2020-12-15)

Artificial intelligence helps scientists develop new general models in ecology
The automation of scientific discoveries is here to stay. Among others, a machine-human cooperation found a hitherto unknown general model explaining the relation between the area and age of an island and the number of species it hosts. (2020-12-11)

Predicting British railway delays using artificial intelligence
Over the past 20 years, the number of passengers traveling on British train networks has almost doubled to 1.7 billion annually. With numbers like that it's clear that people rely on rail service in Great Britain, and how many disgruntled patrons there would be when delays occur. A recent study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used British Railway data and an artificial intelligence model to improve the ability to predict delays in railway networks. (2020-12-10)

BIO Integration journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 3, publishes
BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 3, Publishes. Integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medicine and Biomedicine. Guangzhou, December 5, 2020: New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) publishes its third issue, volume 1, issue 3 which is a themed issue on the integration of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine and biomedicine. (2020-12-07)

Drones and AI detect soybean maturity with high accuracy
Walking rows of soybeans in the mid-summer heat is an exhausting but essential chore in breeding new cultivars. Researchers brave the heat daily during crucial parts of the growing season to find plants showing desirable traits, such as early pod maturity. But without a way to automate detection of these traits, breeders can't test as many plots as they'd like in a given year, elongating the time it takes to bring new cultivars to market. (2020-12-07)

Unlocking the secrets of chemical bonding with machine learning
In a report published in Nature Communications, Hongliang Xin, associate professor of chemical engineering at Virginia Tech, and his team of researchers developed a Bayesian learning model of chemisorption, or Bayeschem for short, aiming to use artificial intelligence to unlock the nature of chemical bonding at catalyst surfaces. (2020-12-04)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

Living with autonomous systems "we can trust"
Autonomous systems are affecting virtually all aspects of society, so future designs must be guided by a broad range of societal stakeholders, according to a new report led by the Oden Institute at UT Austin. (2020-12-02)

Shrinking massive neural networks used to model language
Deep learning neural networks can be massive, demanding major computing power. In a test of the ''lottery ticket hypothesis,'' MIT researchers have found leaner, more efficient subnetworks hidden within BERT models. The discovery could make natural language processing more accessible. (2020-12-01)

AI model uses retinal scans to predict Alzheimer's disease
A form of artificial intelligence designed to interpret a combination of retinal images was able to successfully identify a group of patients who were known to have Alzheimer's disease, suggesting the approach could one day be used as a predictive tool, according to an interdisciplinary study from Duke University. (2020-11-30)

Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts
Recently, a long-form review titled ''Towards 6G wireless communication networks: vision, enabling technologies, and new paradigm shifts'' was published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences Vol. 64, No.1. This article, co-authored by 50 researchers from 24 scientific research institutes, colleges, and companies both at home and abroad, provides a comprehensive survey of the latest progress and developmental trends about 6G networks. (2020-11-25)

Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

Which speaker are you listening to? Hearing aid of the future uses brainwaves to find out
In a noisy room with many speakers, hearing aids can suppress background noise, but they have difficulties isolating one voice - that of the person you're talking to at a party, for instance. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have now addressed that issue with a technique that uses brainwaves to determine within one second whom you're listening to. (2020-11-24)

Milky Way family tree
Galaxies formed by the merging of smaller progenitor galaxies. An international team of astrophysicists led by a scientist from Heidelberg University has succeeded in reconstructing the merger history of our home galaxy, creating a complete family tree. To achieve this, the researchers analysed the properties of globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way with artificial intelligence. Their investigations revealed a previously unknown galaxy collision that must have permanently altered the appearance of the Milky Way. (2020-11-23)

Misinformation or artifact: a new way to think about machine learning
Machine learning has delivered amazing results, but there also have been failures, ranging from the harmless to potentially deadly. New work from University of Houston philosopher Cameron Buckner suggests that common assumptions about the cause behind these supposed malfunctions may be mistaken, information that is crucial for evaluating the reliability of these networks. (2020-11-23)

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts. (2020-11-23)

Research shows the intrinsically nonlinear nature of receptive fields in vision
According to a study led by Marcelo Bertalmío, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, published in the journal of the group Nature, Scientific Reports, which proposes a paradigm shift for both vision science and for artificial intelligence. (2020-11-23)

New tool to combat terrorism
Forensic science experts at Flinders University are refining an innovative counter-terrorism technique that checks for environmental DNA in the dust on clothing, baggage, shoes or even a passport. ''This microscopic environmental trace evidence, based on soil geochemical, bacterial and fungal analysis would complement and enhance current forensic intelligence tools,'' lead researcher Dr Jennifer Young says in new research in Forensic Science International: Genetics. (2020-11-19)

Artificial intelligence & satellite technologies reveal detailed map of air pollution across UK
A novel method that combines artificial intelligence with remote sensing satellite technologies has produced the most detailed coverage of air pollution in Britain to date. Highlighted by new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and published in Remote Sensing, the methodology provides accurate estimates of concentrations of air pollution across Great Britain. (2020-11-19)

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