Nav: Home

Current Intensive Care News and Events

Current Intensive Care News and Events, Intensive Care News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. (2019-06-26)
A hidden truth: Hospital faucets are often home to slime and biofilm
Hand hygiene is a critical component of infection prevention in hospitals, but the unintended consequences include water splashing out of a sink to spread contaminants from dirty faucets according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)
Multiresistant intestinal bacteria spread widely in Vietnamese hospitals
Around half of patients admitted to hospital in Vietnam are carriers of multiresistant intestinal bacteria, which are resistant to carbapenems, a group of broad-spectrum antibiotics. (2019-06-25)
State initiative to address disparities in mother's milk for very low birth weight infants
A new study, published in Pediatrics, indicates that the initiative yielded positive results on improving rates of prenatal human milk education, early milk expression and skin to skin care among mothers of very low birth weight infants during initial hospitalization, but did not lead to sustained improvement in mother's milk provision at hospital discharge. (2019-06-19)
Terminally ill who request doctors make decisions undergo more aggressive final treatments
Terminally ill patients who request that physicians make decisions on their behalf are more likely to receive aggressive treatments in the weeks before they die, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-06-18)
What influences critical care doctors in withdrawing life support for patients with brain injury?
Decisions to withdraw life support treatments in critically ill patients with severe brain injury are complicated, are based on many factors, and are usually made by critical care physicians and families in the intensive care unit. (2019-06-17)
Tiny probe that senses deep in the lung set to shed light on disease
A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists. (2019-06-16)
'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray. (2019-06-12)
New evidence questions use of saline fluids to resuscitate children with sepsis
Doctors have urged hospitals around the world to reconsider the type of fluids used to treat children gravely ill with sepsis. (2019-06-10)
Rapidly removing fluid from ICU patients in kidney failure linked to increased death risk
The faster fluid is removed using continuous dialysis from patients with failing kidneys, the higher the likelihood they will die in the next several months. (2019-06-07)
Imaging tests help reveal heart risks in patients with psoriatic disease
Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis -- collectively termed psoriatic disease -- face increased heart risks. (2019-06-05)
Smaller city effort to aid chronically homeless can be successful
Los Angeles County has the nation's largest number of unsheltered homeless people, but the problem affects communities in the region differently. (2019-06-05)
Everything will connect to the internet someday, and this biobattery could help
In the future, small paper and plastic devices will be able to connect to the internet for a short duration, providing information on everything from healthcare to consumer products, before they are thrown away. (2019-06-04)
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds. (2019-06-04)
Dartmouth study reveals how ACOs use home visits to improve care and reduce hospital use
Dartmouth-led study offers new details about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are using home visits to improve care management and identify patient needs while aiming to reduce costs. (2019-06-04)
High body fat (but not BMI itself) linked to four-fold increase in mortality risk after heart bypass surgery
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3, 2019) shows that mortality in patients who had undergone heart bypass surgery was over 4 times higher in individuals with a high body fat mass, while body mass index (BMI) by itself was not associated with an increase in mortality. (2019-06-02)
Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies
In Switzerland, 1% of children are born 'very prematurely.' These children are at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders. (2019-05-27)
New algorithm uses disease history to predict intensive care patients' chances of survival
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Rigshospitalet have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. (2019-05-24)
Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients
in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster -- by up to 32 minutes -- for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage. (2019-05-22)
Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs
Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a 'closed' intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, (2019-05-22)
Eliminating extended work shifts improves sleep duration for senior resident physicians
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital comparing the work hours and sleep obtained by pediatric resident physicians working extended shifts with those whose scheduled shift lengths were limited to no more than 16 consecutive hours found that hours of sleep per week increased under a modified schedule. (2019-05-20)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI
Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure. (2019-05-19)
New tool measures primary care as a whole
There are a number of measures to assess aspects of primary care, but a new measure breaks new ground by combining experiences of patients, clinicians, and payers and allowing the most informed reporter -- the patient -- to assess vital primary care functions that are often missed. (2019-05-14)
What is association of age with risk of death for ICU patients?
This study of nearly 134,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in France examined the association of age with risk of death in the hospital and then three months and three years after discharge. (2019-05-10)
North York General study shows safest method for prostate cancer biopsies
Only one percent of testing for prostate cancer in North America is done using TPBx. (2019-05-09)
Milk expression within 8 hours associated with lactation success for VLBW infants in NICU
A study led by physician researchers at Boston Medical Center has shown that first milk expression within eight hours of giving birth is associated with the highest probability of mothers of very low-birth-weight infants being able to provide milk throughout hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit. (2019-05-09)
Survey: New moms often overlook critical postpartum care during 'fourth trimester'
A new mom's world is forever changed when her baby arrives. (2019-05-08)
Regenstrief, IU Health study helps chaplains provide proactive care to families in crises
A new model developed and implemented by the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Health provides chaplains with a framework to deliver better care to families and other surrogate decision makers during health emergencies. (2019-04-30)
More intensive blood pressure therapy helps patients with type 2 diabetes regardless of cardiovascular risk
People with type 2 diabetes who received intensive treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 mm/Hg or below experienced fewer heart attacks, strokes and other diabetes complications. (2019-04-29)
Ohio collaborative improves care of opioid-exposed infants
An Ohio Perinatal Quality Collaborative initiative has had a major impact on the care of opioid-exposed infants. (2019-04-29)
Parents of older, healthier newborns with less social support less resilient
Parents of older, healthier newborns with less social support were less resilient during their child's neonatal intensive care unit stay, a finding that correlates with more symptoms of depression and anxiety, according to Children's research presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2019 Annual Meeting. (2019-04-27)
Women who have undergone weight-loss surgery may be at greater
Women who have undergone weight-loss surgery appear to be at higher risk of developing complications during pregnancy, and their babies seem more likely to be born prematurely, small for gestational age, have congenital anomalies and be admitted to intensive care, according to the most comprehensive assessment of how bariatric surgery affects pregnancy outcomes. (2019-04-27)
Children's NICU slashes unintended extubation rates by 60% over 10 years
A quality-improvement project at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Children's National that included standardized taping methods, bedside review of events within 72 hours and reducing how often newborns received chest X-rays reduced unintended extubations by 60% over 10 years and saved an estimated $1.5 million per year, according to research published online April 26, 2019, in Pediatrics. (2019-04-26)
A speedier pipeline to diagnosing genetic diseases in seriously ill infants
Building on previous research, scientists have made improvements to an artificial intelligence pipeline used to diagnose genetic diseases via blood samples obtained from gravely ill infants in a San Diego-based children's hospital. (2019-04-24)
Breakthrough for children with serious epileptic seizures
Emergency medicine doctors now have a better way to treat severe epileptic seizures in children, thanks to a New Zealand-Australian study. (2019-04-17)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
ICU patients with non-brain-related injuries may suffer undetected cognitive dysfunction
Researchers assessed 20 patients as they left the ICU and every single patient had detectable cognitive deficits in two or more cognitive areas of investigation, including memory, attention, decision-making and reasoning. (2019-04-12)
Researchers call for rethink of external NHS inspections amid questions of effectiveness
Researchers at the University of York have shown that costly external NHS hospital inspections are not associated with improvements in quality of care. (2019-04-11)
Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination
Researchers from the University of Toronto presented a new study at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok that aimed to determine the effect of authors' self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research. (2019-04-09)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...