Current Intensive Care News and Events

Current Intensive Care News and Events, Intensive Care News Articles.
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Innate immune system worsens the situation in severe COVID-19
In patients with severe COVID-19, the innate immune system overreacts. This overreaction may underlie the formation of blood clots (thrombi) and deterioration in oxygen saturation that affect the patients. This is shown in an Uppsala University study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. (2021-02-23)

Absence of natural killer cell receptor associated with severe Covid-19
The course and severity of COVID-19 in individual patients is largely influenced by the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and the human immune system. The NKG2C receptor communicates with an infected cell via one of its specialised surface structures, HLA-E, which results in the destruction of virus-infected cells. However, due to a genetic variation, approximately 4% of the population naturally lack the this receptor NKG2C, and in 30% of the population this receptor is only partially available. (2021-02-22)

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills
Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average. (2021-02-18)

Columbia researchers uncover altered brain connectivity after prolonged anesthesia
A body of evidence supports the association between prolonged anesthesia and cognitive impairment, but the Columbia study is first to address the effect of the procedure on neural connections. (2021-02-17)

Neandertal gene variants both increase and decrease the risk for severe COVID-19
Last year, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany showed that a major genetic risk factor for severe COVID-19 is inherited from Neandertals. Now the same researchers show, in a study published in PNAS, that Neandertals also contributed a protective variant. Half of all people outside Africa carry a Neandertal gene variant that reduces the risk of needing intensive care for COVID-19 by 20 percent. (2021-02-16)

New tool predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation
A mathematical model predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation. The results of the study by a research team from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona-Spain) and the Institute of Health Research Pere Virgili show a potential reduction of the current rate of reintubation from 9% to 1% by using machine learning tools. Data from a thousand intensive-care patients with respiratory difficulties has been processed and analysed to create this tool (2021-02-15)

Study predicts UK COVID-19 vaccination program will very quickly reduce deaths but more slowly bring down hospital and ICU admissions
A new modelling study published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that the UK's coronavirus vaccination program is already reducing daily deaths. However, reductions of hospital and intensive care (ICU) admissions will likely take several weeks longer, with large reductions seen by the end of March and continuing into April. (2021-02-11)

Difficulties to care for ICU patients caused by COVID-19
Intensive care nurses highlight patient isolation, fear of the unknown and using nurses who do not usually work in the ICU as key factors in caring for critical COVID-19 patients (2021-02-10)

Lung ultrasound helps predict COVID-19 patient outcomes
Brazilian researchers applied an examination protocol based on an analysis of 12 lung regions to 180 severe patients and found that the higher the lung ultrasound score the greater the risk of ICU admission, intubation and death. (2021-02-10)

Definitely not the flu: risk of death from COVID-19 3.5 times higher than from flu
A new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found that the risk of death from COVID-19 was 3.5 times higher than from influenza. (2021-02-10)

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the most definitive evidence to date that, of the two drugs recommended for light sedation of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU, one is as effective and safe as the other. (2021-02-02)

Opioid prescriptions remained elevated two years after critical care
Nearly 11 percent of people admitted to an ICU in Sweden between 2010 and 2018 received opioid prescriptions on a regular basis for at least six months and up to two years after discharge. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet published in Critical Care Medicine. The findings suggest some may become chronic opioid users despite a lack of evidence of the drugs' long-term effectiveness and risks linked to increased mortality. (2021-02-02)

Data shows strain on ICU capacity leads to more deaths during COVID-19 pandemic
New research from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine shows that people treated in the ICU for COVID-19 are twice as likely to die when the ICU capacity is strained by the number of COVID-19 patients. Strain on hospital capacity has been associated with increased mortality under normal circumstances. This study provides evidence that the same is true during the current pandemic. (2021-02-01)

Study links intensive BP lowering to reduced CV risk in patients exposed to air pollution
In the study 'The Benefits of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Treatment According to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure' published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high levels of air pollution. (2021-02-01)

Latest review shows intensive care mortality from COVID-19 continued to fall in 2020, but improvement is slowing
A meta-analysis of global studies published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that intensive care morality from COVID-19 has continued to fall since the start of the pandemic, but the improvement is slowing and may have plateaued. (2021-02-01)

COVID-19 intensive care mortality in Sweden lower than in many studies from other countries
New research reveals that the COVID-19 intensive care (ICU) mortality rate in Sweden was lower during the first wave of the pandemic than in many studies from other countries. (2021-02-01)

New negative pressure ventilator requiring fewer staffing resources developed in fight against COVID-19
A new negative pressure ventilator which could provide additional treatment options for patients with respiratory failure, including those with COVID-19 - and whose design can be easily adapted to developing countries - has been created by a team that includes anaesthetists, nurses and engineers. (2021-01-19)

DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients. (2021-01-15)

The COVID-19 pandemic in brazil has overwhelmed its health systems
An analysis of the first 250,000 patients admitted to hospital with coronavirus reveals a high mortality and inequities in the quality of healthcare across regions (2021-01-15)

Monash University leads breakthrough against antibiotic-resistance
New research published today has discovered how to revert antibiotic-resistance in one of the most dangerous superbugs. (2021-01-12)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients
COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure. Choice of sedative medications and curbs on family visitation played a role in increasing acute brain dysfunction for these patients. (2021-01-08)

Significant number of patients with sudden loss of consciousness need pre-hospital critical care
Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) in partnership with the University of Surrey has shown the benefits of dispatching HEMS to patients with a sudden, unexplained LOC of medical origin and a high prevalence of acute neurological pathology. (2021-01-07)

Sleep is irreplaceable for the recovery of the brain
Researchers at the Medical Center - University of Freiburg demonstrate, for the first time directly, that active recovery processes take place in the brain during sleep that cannot be replaced by rest / Findings relevant for optimal performance (2021-01-07)

Toxin chimeras slip therapeutics into neurons to treat botulism in animals
Taking advantage of the chemical properties of botulism toxins, two teams of researchers have fashioned non-toxic versions of these compounds that can deliver therapeutic antibodies to treat botulism, a potentially fatal disease with few approved treatments. (2021-01-06)

Low risk of severe COVID-19 in children
Sweden kept preschools, primary and lower secondary schools open during the spring of 2020. So far, little research has been done on the risk of children being seriously affected by COVID-19 when the schools were open. A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has now shown that one child in 130,000 was treated in an intensive care unit on account of COVID-19 during March-June. The study has been published in New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-01-06)

COVID-19 pandemic has shown the need to share precious intensive care bed resources across Europe
New research shows that a majority of European anesthesiologists and intensive care specialists believe that precious intensive care (ICU) capacity should be shared between nations during international emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing countries with excess capacity to help those that are being overwhelmed at any particular moment. (2020-12-22)

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza, comparison of data from over 130,000 hospitalised patients confirms
Nearly twice as many people were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 at the height of the pandemic than were for influenza at the peak of the 2018/2019 flu season, a study of French national data published today in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal has found (COVID-19, 89,530 patients vs influenza, 45,819 patients). (2020-12-17)

How to stop infections caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria
The authors aimed to evaluate in vivo the efficacy of imipenem plus meropenem in an experimental murine model of sepsis caused by clinical isolates of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. The results of this study show that the combination of imipenem plus meropenem could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by strains of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii (OXA-23 and OXA-58). (2020-12-16)

CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. Researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%. (2020-12-16)

Poverty linked to higher risk of Covid-19 death, study suggests
People in the poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe Covid-19 - and to die from the disease - than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units. (2020-12-15)

COVID-19 preprint data rapidly influenced critical care practice
In a new research letter published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers examine whether preprint data on the use of the corticosteroid dexamethasone influenced clinical practice in treating COVID-19 critical care patients throughout Australia. (2020-12-15)

Telemedicine needed to diagnose and treat dysphagia in COVID-19 patients, doctors say
COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the disease, have caused health care providers to change how they treat patients. Clinicians are now frequently using telemedicine to see their patients for routine checkups, saving office visits for emergencies. The same goes for rehabilitation. (2020-12-15)

Singing to preterm infants during kangaroo care reduces maternal anxiety
Premature births are stressful experiences that increase the risk of anxiety for mothers and may hinder the development of interaction between mother and infant. A new study indicates that the combination of singing and kangaroo care boosts the wellbeing of the mothers of preterm infants, also making it easier for them to establish a connection with their baby. (2020-12-14)

Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Potential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease. (2020-12-11)

MGB study finds majority of COVID-19 patients died in hospital
Brigham researchers found that 95.5 percent of individuals who died with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in the MGB health system between February 18 and May 18, 2020 did so in the hospital. To better characterize the intensity of end-of-life care and promote discussions about at-home care, the researchers analyzed specific death settings, determining that roughly 40% of hospital deaths occurred in the ICU. (2020-12-11)

Unexpectedly, data show that anaesthetists and intensive care doctors are at lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with other medical staff
Following the first recorded death of an anaesthetist from COVID-19 in the UK in November 2020, a review of available data published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that unexpectedly, despite their perceived increased exposure to COVID-19 patients and high-risk procedures, anaesthetists and intensive care doctors appear to be at lower risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing COVID-19. (2020-12-11)

Lab results don't explain 'obesity paradox,' but bias may
Results of standard laboratory tests performed on adult outpatients to provide an overall picture of their health are fairly consistent between those with obesity and their leaner counterparts, investigators report. (2020-12-01)

Ongoing anticoagulant treatment does not seem to protect against severe COVID-19
DOAC (direct oral anticoagulant) pills are used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation by preventing blood clots. Even though blood clots are thought to contribute to complications from the new coronavirus infection, users of this class of drug do not seem to be protected against severe COVID-19, reports a large Swedish registry study from Karolinska Institutet published in The Journal of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Thinking outside the cage
A reverse form of host-guest chemistry could upend the way the chemical industry approaches challenging, energy-intensive molecular separations. (2020-11-30)

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