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Current Intensive Care News and Events, Intensive Care News Articles.
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Western diet may increase risk of severe sepsis, death, study finds
A Western diet high in fat and sugar can pack on the pounds. (2019-02-11)
Is it better to have a heart attack while traveling or at home?
Is it better to have a heart attack while travelling or at home? (2019-02-08)
NIH study provides answer to long-held debate on blood sugar control after stroke
Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke. (2019-02-07)
Intensive blood pressure lowering safe for clot-buster-treated stroke patients, but...
Rapidly lowering blood pressure beyond recommended targets safely reduced the risk of bleeding as a side effect in stroke patients but did not limit post-stroke disability. (2019-02-07)
Does intensive blood pressure control reduce the risk of dementia?
Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are projected to affect 115 million people worldwide by 2050. (2019-01-28)
Quality, experience of outpatient care in US for adults with or without primary care
Adults who have primary care receive similar amounts of care as adults who don't, but they receive more high-value care, similar low-value care, and report better access and patient experiences. (2019-01-28)
Lowering blood pressure reduces risk of cognitive impairment
Intensive control of blood pressure in older people significantly reduced the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor of early dementia, in a clinical trial led by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. (2019-01-28)
Alzheimer's Association funds two-year extension of the sprint mind study
The Alzheimer's Association has awarded more than $800,000 to support the SPRINT MIND 2.0 Study, which will further investigate the impact of intensive blood pressure treatment on reducing risk of dementia. (2019-01-28)
Decision-making tool fails to ease anxiety for families of life-support patients
Using a computer-based decision guide to plan treatment for a loved one on life support can help families feel less conflicted, but did not ease symptoms of depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress, according to new research led by Duke Health. (2019-01-28)
Flu vaccination keeps COPD patients out of the hospital
A new study published in the January issue of CHEST® establishes that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and hospitalization if they develop the flu and demonstrates the beneficial effects of influenza vaccination. (2019-01-23)
Virus-based therapy targets a pediatric eye cancer
A cancer-killing, virus-based therapy showed promising effects against retinoblastoma -- a tumor of the retina that affects mainly children -- in mouse models and a pilot clinical trial. (2019-01-23)
No substantial benefit from transplantation reported for a high-risk leukemia subtype
Study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found treatment guided by measuring minimal residual disease was associated with better outcomes for hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. (2019-01-18)
Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best
Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race. (2019-01-16)
Conserving large carnivores in Alaska requires overhauling state policy
Large carnivore management in Alaska should be based on rigorous science and monitoring of the status and trends of carnivore populations, according to a Perspective article published Jan. (2019-01-15)
'Outdated' management plan increases risks to Alaska's large carnivores
Alaskan wildlife management that prioritizes reducing bear and wolf populations so hunters can kill more moose, caribou and deer is both backward and lacks scientific monitoring. (2019-01-15)
Newborns face risks when born to women with the flu
Pregnant women with influenza are more likely to experience complications, but how this affects infants is unclear. (2019-01-09)
Study: Immigrant kids deliberately build STEM skills
US immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings from scholars at Duke University and Stanford University. (2019-01-08)
Muscle atrophy among critically ill kids occurs within one week of mechanical ventilation
Children with life-threatening respiratory failure who require mechanical ventilation in a pediatric intensive care unit commonly experience rapid muscle atrophy, according to a study published online Dec. (2018-12-24)
University of Birmingham develops sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye. (2018-12-21)
Mindfulness training may help support weight loss
Mindfulness training may improve the effectiveness of intensive weight management programs, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2018-12-18)
Pitt chemical engineers advance olefins production through computational modeling
New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering has introduced a method to effectively screen different catalysts that convert light alkanes to olefins. (2018-12-12)
Study highlights potential benefits of continuous EEG monitoring for infant patients
A recent retrospective study evaluating continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) of children in intensive care units found a higher than anticipated number of seizures. (2018-12-12)
Silica paradox
An international team of physicists and materials scientists from NUST MISIS, Bayerisches Geoinstitut (Germany), Linköping University (Sweden), and California Institute of Technology (USA) has discovered 'impossible' modifications of silica coesite-IV and coesite-V - i.e., materials that had not been supposed to exist. (2018-12-11)
First Nations children and youth experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children
First Nations children and youth are experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children, but do not access specialist or mental health services at the same rate as their non-First Nations peers, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-12-10)
Reducing variations in feeding practices and fortifying breast milk helps micro-preemies grow
Standardizing feeding practices, including the timing for fortifying breast milk and formula with essential elements like zinc and protein, improves growth trends for the tiniest preterm infants, according to Children's research presented during the Institute for Healthcare Improvement 2018 Scientific Symposium. (2018-12-10)
Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space
Researchers from the CNRS and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016. (2018-12-05)
Spinal injury throws body clocks off schedule
In the hours and days after a traumatic injury, the gears of circadian clocks fall profoundly out of sync, disrupting body temperature, hormonal rhythms, and immune response, new research shows. (2018-12-04)
Over half of former ICU patients in the UK report symptoms of psychological disorders
Patients in the UK who have survived critical illnesses requiring care in an intensive care unit (ICU) frequently report symptoms of anxiety, PTSD and/or depression, according to a study published in open access journal Critical Care. (2018-11-22)
Improving dementia care and treatment saves thousands of pounds in care homes
Improving staff training in care homes and reducing reliance on harmful medications saves thousands of pounds per year, as well as improving quality of life and reducing agitation in dementia, new research has demonstrated. (2018-11-20)
Fading stripes in Southeast Asia: First insight into the ecology of a threatened rabbit
The Annamite mountains of Vietnam and Lao PDR (Laos) harbour exceptional species richness and endemism, but its wildlife is under threat from widespread and intensive poaching. (2018-11-20)
Being fair: The benefits of early child education
Getting a jump on a low-income child's education can have a positive effect on social behavior even 40 years later, researchers find. (2018-11-20)
Effects of early education intervention on behavior persist for 4 decades
Adults who had received early life, intensive childhood educational intervention display high levels of fairness in social interactions more than 40 years later, even when being fair comes at a high personal cost, according to a new study by Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists. (2018-11-20)
High risk of death in the year after ICU discharge; more hospital days linked to higher mortality
Nearly one in five intensive care unit (ICU) survivors die within one year, and increased hospital use is among the factors associated with a higher risk of death, reports a UK population-based study in the January 2019 issue of Critical Care Medicine, the official journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). (2018-11-19)
Drug resistant infections associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates in India
In one of the largest studies to measure the burden of antibiotic resistance in a low- or middle-income country, researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy report that in-hospital mortality is significantly higher among patients infected with multi-drug resistant (MDR) or extensively drug resistant (XDR) pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. (2018-11-16)
Carbon emissions will start to dictate stock prices
Companies that fail to curb their carbon output may eventually face the consequences of asset devaluation and stock price depreciation, according to a new study out of the University of Waterloo. (2018-11-13)
Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients
A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients. (2018-11-12)
How nurses rate daily job difficulty plays key role in patient care
A neonatal intensive care unit nurse's ability to provide optimal patient care is influenced by a variety of factors -- not just how many babies he or she is caring for or how sick they might be, a new study suggests. (2018-11-12)
Machine-learning system could aid critical decisions in sepsis care
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room. (2018-11-06)
Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety
Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. (2018-11-05)
How often are cost considerations documented in clinical notes?
Treatment in intensive care units (ICUs) is driven by urgency rather than economic considerations. (2018-11-02)
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