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A novel gel electrophoresis technique for rapid biomarker diagnosis via mass spectrometry
Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis enables high-resolution separation of proteins extracted from biological samples, but it requires more than one day of pretreatment to recover the separated proteins trapped inside the gel for detection by mass spectrometry. BAC-DROP, our novel electrophoresis technology, uses a dissolvable form of polyacrylamide gel, which allows sample pretreatment to be completed in about 5 hours. The developed technology will enable the rapid diagnosis of viruses and disease protein markers. (2021-02-18)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

Audiovisual professionalisation affects how the brain perceives media content
According to a study conducted by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Instituto Radio Televisión Española and the Universidad Pablo de Olavide in Seville, audiovisual professionals decrease their eyeblink rate after cuts, suggesting that they can better manage the loss of visual information that blinking entails. (2021-02-05)

Factors, rate of nurse burnout in US
Researchers estimated the rate of nurse burnout in the United States and the factors associated with leaving or considering leaving their jobs due to burnout. (2021-02-04)

Stimulant-associated deaths in US
Researchers looked at changes in the rate of deaths associated with the use of illicit (such as cocaine) and medical  stimulants in the United States from 2010 to 2017. (2021-02-01)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients with cancer undergoing antitumor treatment
The rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients in Italy receiving antitumor treatment was evaluated in this study. (2020-12-17)

UBCO research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up. In a follow-up study from one released previously this year, Assistant Professor Mohammad Zarifi and his team at UBCO's Okanagan MicroElectronics and Gigahertz Applications (OMEGA) Lab, have broadened the scope and functionality of their ice sensors. (2020-12-17)

The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to make us human
With only 1% difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne have developed a new approach to pinpoint, for the first time, adaptive human-specific changes in the way genes are regulated in the brain. (2020-12-16)

A growth mindset of interest can spark innovative thinking
Researchers from Yale-NUS College find that viewing interests as developable, not fixed, can help people make connections among diverse fields that others might miss, with implications for innovation. Their research suggests that understanding this can benefit organisations in generating innovative solutions and ideas, job seekers taking on new or wide-ranging responsibilities, and can create a culture for interdisciplinary learning and problem-solving. (2020-11-25)

High achievement cultures may kill students' interest in math -- especially for girls
In countries where academic performance in math is high, students paradoxically tend to have lower levels of interest in the subject. A recent study suggests that this effect is even stronger among girls, potentially explaining why they tend to do slightly less well at math than their male peers in high-achieving countries. (2020-11-25)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Job interest not a big predictor of job satisfaction
Interest in an occupation matters, but not as much as you might think when it comes to job satisfaction. While it's not a strong predictor of satisfaction, a University of Houston researcher found that it may help in your performance on the job. (2020-11-11)

Four major predictors of COVID-19 emerge in Texas A&M study
In March 2020, New York City, an icon of America, was unfortunately named an early epicenter of the novel coronavirus. Now seven months later, America faces a new surge in coronavirus cases and researchers at Texas A&M University hope to provide information and context to help with the battle ahead. (2020-11-04)

How do basal ganglia neurons convey information for the control of voluntary movements?
Researchers revealed how neurons in the basal ganglia, which are a brain region crucial for the control of voluntary movements and whose damage induces motor impairment, such as Parkinson's disease, convey information for the movement control by recording activity of multiple neurons simultaneously in Japanese monkeys. (2020-10-27)

How important is sex to women as they age?
CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--Despite a common belief that women lose interest in sex as they age, a new study demonstrates that a significant percentage of women continue to rate sex as important throughout midlife. The study also identified those factors affecting which women continue to value sex most. Study results will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), which opens on September 28. (2020-09-28)

Patients' breathing test comes up short on accuracy, study finds
A routine test used to monitor patients' breathing may be unreliable and putting them at risk, a study suggests. Incorrect results can mean clinical staff fail to spot how unwell a patient with respiratory problems is becoming, researchers say. (2020-09-27)

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. (2020-09-21)

Changes in hospitalizations for alcohol use disorder in US
Changes over nearly two decades in the rate of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from alcohol use disorder in the US were examined in this study. (2020-09-21)

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes
For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective ''early warning'' of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. (2020-09-11)

Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds
Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus. (2020-09-10)

Holistic bursting cells might be basis of brain cognition
Recently, scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators at home and abroad, presented the discovery of ''holistic bursting'' cells, a novel functional class of cortical neurons that represent learned complex objects as wholes rather than parts. (2020-09-03)

A government program that reduces mortgage defaults
Lower-income households that received mortgages through state affordable mortgage programs were less likely to default or foreclose than similar households that received conventional financing, a national study found. Researchers examined the outcomes of homeownership programs administered by Housing Finance Agencies (HFAs), which are state chartered agencies operating in all 50 states that work to provide affordable housing to low- and moderate-income households. (2020-08-27)

Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled ''Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in the Context of the Monetary Regime Change'' is published in the ''Monetary policy'' section. (2020-08-27)

Vertebral body tethering shows clinical success as treatment for scoliosis
Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity affecting pediatric patients. A posterior spinal fusion (PSF) is the gold standard treatment for patients with curves exceeding 45 degrees, but the procedure's drawbacks include the loss of spinal mobility, persistent pain and adjacent segment disc disease. However, a new retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine shows an alternative to PSF called vertebral body tethering (VBT) yields promising results with fewer long-term consequences for a specific group of scoliosis patients. (2020-08-27)

Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children without COVID-19 symptoms
The rate of positive test results for SARS-CoV-2 in children without symptoms who were treated in U.S. hospitals for other conditions was examined in this study. (2020-08-25)

Unconventional monetary policy and bank risk taking
Unconventional monetary policy does not lead to greater risk-taking by banks, according to new research. This will be welcome news for policymakers and central banks as they ramp up efforts to limit the economic fallout of the pandemic. (2020-08-19)

Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclusion of a new large-scale study conducted at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-08-19)

SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care workers in hospital
This study sought to establish the rate of COVID-19 among health care workers through widespread screening for SARS-CoV-2 exposure in a large community hospital. (2020-08-11)

Fuel from disused tyres
The journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, which describes the work relating to the catalytic pyrolysis of tyres to see which products can be obtained in this process and their possible applications as fuel. (2020-08-06)

Credible assumptions replace missing data in COVID analysis
How contagious is COVID-19, and how severe is the virus for those who've caught it? (2020-08-06)

Gout diagnoses rising worldwide
The prevalence of gout -- a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints--increased across the world at an alarming rate from 1990 to 2017, according to an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. (2020-08-05)

Medical journals' commercial publishing contracts may lead to biased articles
Scientists have long been concerned that the common practice of medical journals accepting commercial payments from pharmaceutical companies may lead to pro-industry bias in published articles. According to new research at The University of Texas at Austin, scientists were right to be concerned, but they were focusing on the wrong type of payments. (2020-07-27)

Teen museum educators increase engagement, learning, in tween visitors
A new study finds that youth docents have an overall positive effect on visitors' experiences, learning and information retention at informal learning sites -- like museums. The positive effects accrued across age groups regardless of museum type, but were most apparent in children ages 9 to 11. (2020-07-23)

Rural firearm-suicides impacted by socioeconomic, environmental factors
In an attempt to address the escalating rate of self-inflicted firearm injury deaths in rural America, researchers are proposing interventions to reduce these suicides be community-based and include programs to reduce other diseases of despair, such as heart and liver diseases, diabetes and accidental opioid overdose. The recent decline in life expectancy of Americans has been attributed to these diseases of despair and appear to primarily afflict white rural America (2020-07-21)

Coronavirus antibodies fall dramatically in first 3 months after mild cases of COVID-19
A study by UCLA researchers shows that in people with mild cases of COVID-19, antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes the disease -- drop sharply over the first three months after infection, decreasing by roughly half every 73 days. If sustained at that rate, the antibodies would disappear within about a year. (2020-07-21)

Total-body dynamic PET successfully detects metastatic cancer; first patient results
Results from the first study using uEXPLORER to conduct total-body dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans in cancer patients show that it can be used to generate high-quality images of metastatic cancer. The research was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting on July 11-14, 2020. (2020-07-13)

Association of state-level opioid-reduction policies with opioid poisonings in kids
Researchers compared the rate of opioid poisonings in children and teens before and after implementation of state-level policies intended to decrease the amount of opioid medications prescribed and distributed. (2020-07-13)

Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study
Most people would agree that the pleasure of some foods stems in part from its fat content. New research, led by the Monell Chemical Senses Center, has now found that liking of fatty food is more complex than its fat content alone -- it could also be related to inborn genetic traits of the consumer related to fat perception. (2020-07-13)

Study of supercooled liquids contributes to better understanding of phase change processes
The authors propose a new quantitative approach to better measure the crystal growth rate in supercooled liquids. The approach is based on a unique statistical algorithm used in molecular dynamics simulation. (2020-07-09)

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