Current Internal Medicine News and Events

Current Internal Medicine News and Events, Internal Medicine News Articles.
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'Mini brain' organoids grown in lab mature much like infant brains
A new study from UCLA and Stanford University researchers finds that three-dimensional human stem cell-derived 'mini brain' organoids can mature in a manner that is strikingly similar to human brain development. (2021-02-22)

Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division
Many biological processes are subject to rhythmic changes. Well-known examples of this are the so-called circadian rhythm, an ''internal clock'' with a period of around 24 hours, or the shorter ultradian rhythm. Cell division is often linked to these rhythms. Biologists from Saarbr├╝cken and Kaiserslautern have now found out that these rhythms and their coupling with cell division is closely related to hydrogen peroxide. The study was published in the renowned journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-02-16)

New ACIP Adult Immunization Schedule recommends changes to several vaccines, includes interim recomm
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has released its 2021 Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule that includes changes to several vaccines including influenza, hepatitis A, human papillomavirus (HPV); and the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The schedule also includes interim recommendations for COVID-19 vaccination. The complete schedule, including changes in the vaccine notes section, is being simultaneously published in Annals of Internal Medicine and on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) web site. (2021-02-11)

Researchers produce tiny nanoparticles and reveal their inner structure for the first time
Tiny nanoparticles can be furnished with dyes and could be used for new imaging techniques, as chemists and physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) show in a recent study. The researchers have also been the first to fully determine the particles' internal structure. Their results were published in the renowned journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-02-08)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

Prostate drug associated with lower risk of Parkinson's disease
Taking a particular type of medication to treat enlarged prostate is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a large observational study by researchers at the University of Iowa, and colleagues in Denmark and China. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, suggest that terazosin, and similar medications, might have potential to prevent or delay the development of Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-01)

50 million-year-old fossil assassin bug has unusually well-preserved genitalia
The fossilized insect is tiny and its genital capsule, called a pygophore, is roughly the length of a grain of rice. It is remarkable, scientists say, because the bug's physical characteristics -- from the bold banding pattern on its legs to the internal features of its genitalia -- are clearly visible and well-preserved. Recovered from the Green River Formation in present-day Colorado, the fossil represents a new genus and species of predatory insects known as assassin bugs. (2021-01-19)

New research finds connection: Inflammation, metabolism and scleroderma scarring
Study finds NAD+ break down leads to multi organ scarring, providing now a previously undiscovered pathogenic role of the enzyme CD38 in disease scarring. (2021-01-19)

NIH officials highlight COVID-19 vaccine facts, unknowns for healthcare providers
Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-18)

A rift in the retina may help repair the optic nerve
In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases. (2021-01-14)

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees. (2021-01-12)

Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions. (2021-01-12)

Study reports patient-reported loss of smell in 86% of mild COVID-19 cases
A reduced sense of smell, or olfactory dysfunction, is one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19. A recent study published the Journal of Internal Medicine has examined it prevalence and recovery in patients with varying degrees of severity of COVID-19. (2021-01-06)

State laws promoting flu vaccination for hospital workers may help prevent deaths from flu and pneum
Research suggests that state laws promoting influenza vaccination for hospital workers can be effective in preventing deaths from pneumonia and influenza, particularly among the elderly. Findings from a quasi-experimental observational study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-04)

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Study shows women less likely to survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than men
DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2020 - A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest. (2020-12-14)

PET imaging tracer proves effective for diagnosing and managing rare CNS B-cell lymphoma
Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-pentixafor is an effective diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) B-cell lymphoma, according to a proof-of-concept study published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-12-10)

Uniquely human gene may drive numerous cancers
A new study published in FASEB BioAdvances reveals a human-specific connection between advanced carcinomas and a gene called SIGLEC12. (2020-12-09)

Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD. (2020-12-03)

New review confirms disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic populations
Black and Hispanic populations are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to a systematic review published this week. The disparities were likely related to minority populations being at higher risk of exposure to the coronavirus as opposed to underlying health conditions or other factors, according to the review led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System. (2020-12-03)

Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Researchers report the ability to improve safety and efficacy using a CRISPR-Cas9 variant known as miCas9. (2020-12-03)

Adults with overweight or obesity often don't recognize they have a weight problem
A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data found that more than 40% of U.S. adults with overweight and nearly 10% with obesity did not consider themselves to be overweight. This trend has increased over the last two decades and was especially true of non-Hispanic Blacks and persons with low socioeconomic status. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Ongoing anticoagulant treatment does not seem to protect against severe COVID-19
DOAC (direct oral anticoagulant) pills are used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation by preventing blood clots. Even though blood clots are thought to contribute to complications from the new coronavirus infection, users of this class of drug do not seem to be protected against severe COVID-19, reports a large Swedish registry study from Karolinska Institutet published in The Journal of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition. So-called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease of the heart that can occur during extreme stress events. Heart and hormone research teams in Bochum and Mannheim have now shown that there is apparently a strong link between the occurrence of Takotsubo syndrome and impaired thyroid function in patients. (2020-12-01)

Efficient and durable perovskite solar cell materials
POSTECH professor Kilwon Cho's research team fabricates highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells through molecular designing of organic spacers. (2020-11-24)

Limited access to buprenorphine restricts resident physicians treating opioid abusers
A University of South Florida Health-led survey of resident physicians in Florida indicates they are interested in treating opioid addiction but face barriers to offering patients treatment using buprenorphine, an FDA-approved medication shown to successfully decrease opioid use, overdose events, and deaths associated with opioids. Many states have reported increased deaths from opioids since the COVID-19 epidemic began, underscoring the need to remove barriers to care. (2020-11-20)

COVID-19 News from Annals of Internal Medicine
Ethical and Scientific Considerations Regarding the Early Approval and Deployment of a COVID-19 Vaccine. (2020-11-20)

Denmark trial measures effectiveness of adding a mask recommendation to other public health measures
Denmark trial measures effectiveness of adding a mask recommendation to other public health measures for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection. (2020-11-18)

Radioactive elements may be crucial to the habitability of rocky planets
The amount of long-lived radioactive elements incorporated into a rocky planet as it forms may be a crucial factor in determining its future habitability. That's because internal heating from the radioactive decay of the heavy elements thorium and uranium drives plate tectonics and may be necessary for the planet to generate a magnetic field. Earth's magnetic field protects the planet from solar winds and cosmic rays. (2020-11-10)

Outcome of 2016 US election associated with poorer mental health in Clinton voters
There were 54.6 million more days of poor mental health among adults in states that voted for Hillary Clinton in December 2016, compared to October 2016, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. No such increase in poor mental health following the 2016 US election was observed in states that voted for Donald Trump. The increase in average number of poor mental health days per person in Clinton-voting states largely persisted in the six months after the election. (2020-11-02)

New cause of COVID-19 blood clots identified
A new study reveals that COVID-19 triggers production of antibodies circulating through the blood, causing clots in people hospitalized with the disease. (2020-11-02)

ACP leaders urge consideration of presidential candidates' proposals for better US health care
As voters cast their ballots, it is important for them to know the health care proposals of the two presidential candidates and how they will address and improve the U.S. health care system especially in light of the problems with the system that have been underscored this year during the COVID-19 pandemic, say leaders from the American College of Physicians (ACP). (2020-10-26)

Time is not on their side: physicians face barriers to voting
Two new UT Southwestern studies published today report some surprising findings: Only half of practicing physicians are registered to vote, and the most common obstacle faced by resident physicians is the lack of time to vote. The researchers say finding ways to increase voter participation among doctors is critical as the nation tackles health care issues. (2020-10-22)

Does the new heart transplant allocation policy encourage gaming by providers?
A new national policy was created to make determining who receives a heart transplant more fair. But new data shows it changed some practice patterns, too. (2020-10-20)

ACP and Annals of Internal Medicine hold virtual COVID-19 vaccine forum
The American College of Physicians (ACP) and Annals of Internal Medicine hosted a virtual forum on October 16 assembling some of the country's leading health experts to discuss timely, evidence-based information related to what physicians and other health care professionals need to know about a COVID-19 vaccine. During the forum, experts discussed the progress of the science and the challenges related to bringing the vaccine to the public. (2020-10-19)

Stressed out volcanoes more likely to collapse and erupt, study finds
An international study led by Monash scientists has discovered how volcanoes experience stress. The study, published in Scientific Reports, has implications for how the world might be better protected against future volcano collapses. (2020-10-15)

Young people hospitalized with COVID-19 face substantial adverse outcomes
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed records from 419 hospitals using the Premier Healthcare Database to study the clinical trajectories of 3,222 hospitalized COVID-19 patients aged 18-34. Researchers found that over one-fifth of the patients (21 percent) required intensive care, 10 percent required mechanical ventilation and 2.7 percent died. (2020-10-08)

Tohoku University teaches old spectroscope new tricks
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. The details of their 'omnidirectional photoluminescence (ODPL) spectroscopy' set-up were published in the journal Applied Physics Express, and could help improve the fabrication of materials for electric cars and solar cells. (2020-10-05)

Cardiac arrest, poor survival rates common in sickest patients with COVID-19
Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients. (2020-09-30)

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