Current Invasive Species News and Events | Page 25

Current Invasive Species News and Events, Invasive Species News Articles.
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Early species developed much faster than previously thought, OHIO research shows
When Earth's species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species, according to a new study by Dr. Alycia Stigall, Professor of Geological Sciences at Ohio University. (2019-08-15)

Epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia
What to Do with Epicardial Coronary Artery Abnormalities That do not Result in Myocardial Ischemia? In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 109-111 ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0067 C. Richard Conti from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, USA considers epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia. (2019-08-15)

Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals
Researchers have discovered that the numbers of plant species recorded by botanists have increased in locations where the climate has changed most rapidly, and especially in relatively cold parts of the world. (2019-08-15)

AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology. (2019-08-14)

New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. Parasitoid wasps are one of the animal groups that are the most rich in species. However, the tropical species are still very poorly known. Understanding the diversity of parasitoid wasps inhabiting rainforests is important, because tropical biodiversity is dwindling at an accelerating rate. (2019-08-14)

Monster penguin find in Waipara, New Zealand
A new species of giant penguin -- about 1.6 metres tall -- has been identified from fossils found in Waipara, North Canterbury in New Zealand. (2019-08-14)

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge
Research conducted at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay, Oahu revealed a unique feeding strategy, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge. (2019-08-14)

Research bias may leave some primates at risk
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University. (2019-08-14)

Rare antelopes and black cats
Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by a research group of Würzburg University. The protected areas of the mountain are of tremendous importance for the biodiversity of this animal group. (2019-08-14)

Non-native invasive insects, diseases decreasing carbon stored in US forests
A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States. (2019-08-13)

DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early
A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely. (2019-08-13)

Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot
Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees -- such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer -- Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle. (2019-08-12)

Scent brings all the songbirds to the yard
Lehigh University scientists found that not only can chickadees smell, but the males and females prefer the smell of their own species over the smell of the opposite species. These preferences could be impacting hybridization. Their results have been published in an article entitled: 'Conspecific olfactory preferences and interspecific divergence in odor cues in a chickadee hybrid zone' in Ecology and Evolution. (2019-08-12)

Genomic research led by HKBU unravels mystery of invasive apple snails
Biologists from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have led a study to sequence and analyse the genomes of four apple snail species in the family Ampullariidae. The researchers discovered that the apple snails have evolved to become highly sensitive to environmental stimuli, digest cellulose (a major component of the plant cell wall), form hard calcareous eggshells and pack neurotoxins in eggs. The findings could facilitate the development of effective genetic control measures for these destructive crop-eating snails. (2019-08-12)

New diagnostic method for fungal infections could combat a major global health risk
A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) has demonstrated how dual DNA barcoding could help improve the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases, giving patients access to potentially life-saving treatment much sooner. (2019-08-09)

Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii). (2019-08-08)

88% decline of big freshwater animals
Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have now quantified the global decline of big freshwater animals: from 1970 to 2012, global populations of freshwater megafauna declined by 88% -- twice the loss of vertebrate populations on land or in the ocean. Large fish species are particularly affected. (2019-08-08)

When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price
Jacob Barney, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' School of Plant and Environmental Sciences, graduate researcher Becky Fletcher, and a team of five other doctoral students conducted the first-ever comprehensive meta-analytic review examining the ecological impacts of invasive plants by exploring how animals -- indigenous and exotic -- respond to these nonnative plants. Their study, which took place over a two-year period, is published in the journal Global Change Biology. (2019-08-08)

Substituting poultry for red meat may reduce breast cancer risk
Results from a new study suggest that red meat consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer, whereas poultry consumption may be protective against breast cancer risk. The findings are published in the International Journal of Cancer. (2019-08-07)

A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. New research by Dr. Shari Rodriguez and Dr. Christie Sampson from Clemson University, publishing August 6, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects of these less-studied relationships, particularly for feral hogs and elephants, and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock. (2019-08-06)

Wits University PhD student discovers new species of early dinosaur
The team of scientists, led by PhD Student Kimberley Chapelle, recognised that the dinosaur was not only a new species of sauropodomorph, but an entirely new genus. The specimen has now been named Ngwevu intloko which means 'grey skull' in the Xhosa language. (2019-08-06)

New Zealand's biodiversity will take millions of years to recover
The arrival of humans in New Zealand, some 700 years ago, triggered a wave of extinction among native bird species. Many more species are currently under threat. Recent calculations by scientists from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and Massey University in New Zealand show that it would take at least 50 million years of evolution to restore the biodiversity that has been lost. Their results were published in the journal Current Biology. (2019-08-05)

It would take 50 million years to recover New Zealand's lost bird species
Half of New Zealand's birds have gone extinct since humans arrived on the islands. Many more are threatened. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 5 estimate that it would take approximately 50 million years to recover the number of bird species lost since humans first colonized New Zealand. (2019-08-05)

New study aims to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases
CABI's expert scientists in the field of ecosystems management and invasion ecology have presented new guidance on ways to help protect the world's trees and forests from harmful pests and diseases such as the box tree moth and ash dieback. Researchers suggest that a number of important factors should be considered when monitoring for non-native pests that can pose a serious threat to forest resources and have significant negative economic, biodiversity and livelihood impacts. (2019-08-05)

Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands
A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. They named the new species Gastrodia amamiana, and the findings were published in the online edition of Phytotaxa on August 2, 2019. (2019-08-02)

New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. (2019-08-02)

Eleven new species of rain frogs discovered in the tropical Andes
Eleven new frog species were described in the open-access journal ZooKeys. This is the largest number of frog species described in a single article from the western hemisphere in over a decade. Additionally, the publication is also impressive by being the result of an undergraduate thesis. The species were discovered in the tropical Andes of Central and Southern Ecuador by researchers from the Museum of Zoology of the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador. (2019-08-02)

Fishing for insights into evolutionary change in the genome of frozen fish
Using decades-old frozen fish, researchers have discovered roots of rapid evolutionary adaptation to human activity in the Anthropocene. Similar traits - at least in the fish they studied -- can arise through highly divergent genetic pathways, the researchers say. (2019-08-01)

Species aren't adapting fast enough to cope with climate change, according to new study
Many species are adapting to climate change, but those adaptations aren't occurring fast enough to guarantee their long-term survival, according to a recent study that analyzed 10,000 published scientific papers. An Iowa State University biologist contributed to the international research team. (2019-08-01)

Mastering metabolism for shark and ray survival
Understanding the internal energy flow -- including the metabolism -- of large ocean creatures like sharks and rays could be key to their survival in a changing climate, according to a new study. University of Queensland PhD candidate Christopher Lawson led a team of researchers investigating the bioenergetics of sharks and rays; data which may reveal how they will fare in a drastically changing ocean. (2019-07-31)

Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara
When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new University of Liverpool study reveals. The findings, which are published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, could help conservationists better predict the risk of extinction faced by endangered species. (2019-07-31)

Citizen scientists offer ray of hope
Volunteer snorkelers and scuba divers have been helping capture images of reef manta rays to better protect the threatened species. The University of Queensland initiative - Project Manta - relied on these citizen scientists to photograph or video individual reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) across Australia's east coast. (2019-07-31)

Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands
More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. Now, a new UBC-led study suggests that Indigenous-managed lands may play a critical role in helping species survive. (2019-07-31)

Sexual competition helps horned beetles survive deforestation
A study of how dung beetles survive deforestation in Borneo suggests that species with more competition among males for matings are less likely to go extinct, according to research led by scientists from Queen Mary University of London and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. (2019-07-30)

New method increases accuracy of nontuberculous mycobacteria identification
The more than 200 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are notoriously difficult to differentiate, delaying the implementation of targeted antibiotic therapy. Researchers from Osaka University and the University of the Ryukyus in Japan have now developed a comprehensive database of 175 NTM species based on new and existing genome sequences, along with specialized comparative software, that can be used to accurately identify unknown NTM isolates. (2019-07-30)

Cigarette smoke makes MRSA superbug bacterium more drug-resistant
Cigarette smoke can make MRSA bacterial strains more resistant to antibiotics, new research from the University of Bath has shown. (2019-07-30)

Ladies' choice: What drives faster, flashier formation of new animal species
Evolution is actually a Sadie Hawkins dance, as new research shows females not only determine whether male animals develop bright colors, but also how fast new species develop. (2019-07-26)

Revolutionary method could bring us much closer to the description of hyperdiverse faunas
Largely relying on DNA barcoding, rather than traditional practices, a simplified diagnostics method for species description could be the key to revealing Earth's biodiversity before much of it goes extinct. Proposed by a US-Canadian research team in a new publication in the open-access journal Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift, the approach is demonstrated in practice with the description of 18 new to science species of parasitic wasps, recently discovered from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica. (2019-07-25)

Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the environment has not been reduced despite the regulation that prohibits the possession of these species since 2011. (2019-07-25)

How climate change disrupts relationships
Plants rely on bees for pollination; bees need plants to supply nectar and pollen. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have studied how climate change affects these mutualistic interactions. (2019-07-24)

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