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Current Invertebrates News and Events, Invertebrates News Articles.
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Seagulls favor food humans have handled
Seagulls favor food that has been handled by humans, new research shows. (2020-02-25)

Diversifying traditional forest management to protect forest arthropods
The structure of vegetation and steam distance are important factors to consider in order to protect the biodiversity of forest arthropods, as stated in an article now published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. The conclusions of the study note the farther we are from a river course, the better conditions for the communities of arthropods in the forests, since they need a cool and wet microclimate. (2020-02-20)

Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)

Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), and published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-02-17)

Mass General Hospital researchers identify new 'universal' target for antiviral treatment
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel potential antiviral drug target that could lead to treatments protecting against a host of infectious diseases. (2020-02-11)

Flyception 2.0: New imaging technology tracks complex social behavior
An advanced imaging technology developed at UC San Diego is allowing scientists unprecedented access into brain activities during intricate behaviors. The 'Flyception2' system has produced the first-ever picture of what happens in the brain during mating in any organism, in addition to surprise findings about neuron activity during copulation. (2020-02-04)

Zoo improvements should benefit all animals
Zoo improvements should benefit all animals and include a wide range of 'enrichment' techniques, researchers say. (2020-01-31)

A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around. (2020-01-29)

Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve
Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. In the short term carcasses attract many more insects and other arthropods. In the long term, plant growth increases. Plants located near animal carcasses became five times bigger than usual, leading to a surge in the number of plant-eating invertebrates on the plants and, therefore, also in the number of their predators. (2020-01-22)

Global study finds predators are most likely to be lost when habitats are converted for human use
A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (2020-01-21)

Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior
Research by scientists at Ghent University (Belgium), University of Plymouth (UK) and University of South Carolina (USA) shows the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) makes considerable changes to its feeding habits when faced with warmer and more acidified oceans. (2020-01-20)

Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea. (2020-01-20)

The mysterious, legendary giant squid's genome is revealed
Important clues about the anatomy and evolution of the mysterious giant squid (Architeuthis dux) are revealed through publication of its full genome sequence by a University of Copenhagen-led team that includes scientist Caroline Albertin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole. (2020-01-16)

Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams
The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams. Eurac Research ecologists have compared 15 streams and found that in streams running through extensive meadows with grazing animals -- regardless of elevation -- biodiversity is greater. The study was published in the renowned international journal Freshwater Biology. (2020-01-07)

Organic crop practices affect long-term soil health
Prior organic farming practices and plantings can have lasting outcomes for future soil health, weeds and crop yields, according to new Cornell University research. (2019-12-20)

Floral foam adds to microplastic pollution problem: Study
First study to examine the environmental effects of floral foam finds the plastic material, which breaks into tiny pieces, can be eaten by a range of freshwater and marine animals and affect their health. (2019-12-10)

Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. They are named so because of their color. To understand how such ecosystems function, scientists from Tyumen analyzed the chemical composition of water and studied the invertebrates' species living in them. These lakes are good model objects for studying the laws of geological history and the formation of the earth's surface, features of the natural and technogenic geo-and hydrochemical background of the region. (2019-12-05)

New fossil shrimp species from Colombia helps fill 160 million-year gap
A new fossil species of comma shrimp, exceptionally preserved in mid-Cretaceous rocks of the Colombian Andes, allowed scientists to fill a 160 million-year gap in the evolution of these crustaceans. (2019-11-27)

Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, covers species that are important for fisheries and that serve as food for fish, such as copepods and other zooplankton. (2019-11-25)

Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges
Despite efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates. For the first time, scientists have developed a breakthrough in marine invertebrate (sponge) cell culture, demonstrating exceptionally fast cell division and the ability to subculture the cells. This groundbreaking discovery forms the basis for developing marine invertebrate cell models to better understand early animal evolution, determine the role of secondary metabolites, predict the impact of climate change to coral reef community ecology and develop novel medicines. (2019-11-21)

Mantis shrimp vs. disco clams: Colorful sea creatures do more than dazzle
Eight years ago, Lindsey Dougherty encountered a colorful creature called a disco clam in an Indonesian reef. Now, recent research suggests that she may be narrowing in on answering why this bivalve looks so wild. (2019-11-18)

Fishery in Lake Shinji, Japan, collapsed 1 year after neonicotinoid use
Neonicotinoid pesticide use may have caused the abrupt collapse of two commercial fisheries on Lake Shinji, Japan, in 1993, according to a new study. (2019-10-31)

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago
Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago. (2019-10-08)

L-chondrite breakup might have contributed to Ordovician biodiversification
About 466 Mya, a major impact event took place between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Space dust spread all across the solar system, and some of it was found near Saint-Petersburg, Russia, and in the south of Sweden. (2019-10-03)

Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji
The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword. Just as Australian researchers are finding colourful new bee species, some of them are already showing signs of exposure to environmental changes. (2019-09-23)

Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur bones, pickled sharks, dried leaves, and every other part of the natural world.These specimens are used in research by scientists trying to understand how different kinds of life evolved and how we can protect them. A study in PLOS ONE shows how scientists are using digital records of all these specimens in their research. (2019-09-11)

Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic
Modern flamingos employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. Very similar contents are described from more than 150-million-year-old pterosaur droppings in a recent paper in PeerJ. This represents the first direct evidence of filter-feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs and demonstrates that their diet and feeding environment were similar to those of modern flamingos. (2019-08-26)

Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years
A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years. The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology analysed data from the regular monitoring of both chemicals and invertebrates in the River Ray in Wiltshire -- downstream from Swindon's large wastewater treatment plant - between 1977 and 2016. (2019-08-14)

Staring at seagulls could save your chips
Staring at seagulls makes them less likely to steal your food, new research shows. (2019-08-06)

Toxic chemicals hindering the recovery of Britain's rivers
Toxic chemicals from past decades could be hindering the recovery of Britain's urban rivers, concludes a recent study by scientists from Cardiff University, the University of Exeter, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. (2019-08-01)

The urbanization of the beach
Some of Southern California's most iconic and popular beaches have lost most of their biodiversity, according to marine scientists. (2019-07-31)

Lobster organs and reflexes damaged by marine seismic surveys
A new study of the impact on marine life of seismic air guns, used in geological surveys of the seafloor, has found that the sensory organs and righting reflexes of rock lobster can be damaged by exposure to air gun signals. (2019-07-24)

The case of the poisoned songbirds
Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2019-06-26)

A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record
Instead of the typical bell-shaped curve, the fossil record shows a fat-tailed distribution, with extreme, outlier, events occurring with higher-than-expected probability. Using the same mathematical tools that describe stock market crashes, Santa Fe Institute scientists explain the evolutionary dynamics that give rise to universal patterns in the fossil record. (2019-06-26)

Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application
The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. Jennifer Weathered and Edd Hammill report that the impacts of agricultural pesticides on assemblages of aquatic insects varied resulting in distinct ecological winners and losers within aquatic communities. (2019-06-17)

The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate
Researchers from the University of Plymouth and the British Antarctic Survey have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen than smaller animals, and so will be more sensitive to future global climate change. However, evolutionary innovation can to some extent offset any respiratory disadvantages of large body size. (2019-06-16)

57% of the plastic waste on the Tarragona coast is clothing fibers from washing machines
The sea water, beaches and sediments on the Tarragona coast contain quantities of plastic similar to those in a big city like Barcelona. And more than half are clothing fibres from washing machines. This is one of the main findings of a study carried out by researchers from the URV's research group Tecnatox and presented at a congress in Helsinki. (2019-06-10)

Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers
Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont. (2019-06-03)

Tiny fish live fast, die young
Fish on coral reefs manage to thrive in isolated areas where there are very low levels of nutrients for them to use. How? The answer may lie in the tiny fish that live in the gaps in the coral structure. (2019-05-23)

What makes a place a home?
Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass. However, the influence of seawater temperature was found to have the strongest effect on lionfish distribution, with higher lionfish densities recorded at sites with lower bottom temperatures. These results suggest that cold-water upwelling may result in higher abundances of prey fish and lionfish. (2019-05-21)

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