Current Ionic Liquids News and Events

Current Ionic Liquids News and Events, Ionic Liquids News Articles.
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Ionic liquid uniformly delivers chemotherapy to tumors while destroying cancerous tissue
A Mayo Clinic team, led by Rahmi Oklu, M.D., Ph.D., a vascular and interventional radiologist at Mayo Clinic, in collaboration with Samir Mitragotri, Ph.D., of Harvard University, report the development of a new ionic liquid formulation that killed cancer cells and allowed uniform distribution of a chemotherapy drug into liver tumors and other solid tumors in the lab. This discovery could solve a problem that has long plagued drug delivery to tumors. (2021-02-11)

Survey: Cleaning product use affecting asthma more during COVID-19 measures
Those with asthma are experiencing less asthma control related to an increase in using household disinfectants -- known asthma triggers -- because of COVID-19, according to a survey co-conducted by University of Illinois Chicago researchers. (2021-02-10)

Packing more juice in lithium-ion batteries through silicon anodes and polymeric coatings
Although silicon anodes could greatly boost the capacity of Li-ion batteries, their performance rapidly degrades with use. Polymeric coatings can help solve this problem, but very few studies have explored the underlying mechanisms. In a recent study, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology investigate how a poly(borosiloxane) coating greatly stabilizes the capacity of silicon anodes, paving the way for better and more durable Li-ion batteries for electric cars and renewable energy harvesting. (2021-02-05)

The proton conduction mechanism in protic ionic liquids
Researchers from Niigata University, Japan along with their collaborators from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, Yamagata University, Japan and University of Regensburg, Germany have reported a marked shift in the hydrogen ion hopping mechanism as a function of acid/alkali index in protic ionic liquids. The study holds immense potential to revolutionize the development of protonic conductors for fuel cells. These promising results are now published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2021-02-04)

Nanotech plastic packaging could leach silver into some types of foods and beverages
Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the material and form nanoparticles in foods and beverages, particularly in sweet and sugary ones. (2021-02-03)

Why food sticks to nonstick frying pans
Foods will sometimes get stuck to a heated surface, even if oil or a nonstick frying pan is used. Scientists have investigated the fluid properties of oil on a flat surface and their work shows convection may be to blame. When the pan is heated from below, a temperature gradient is established in the oil film, as well as a surface tension gradient. This gradient sets up a type of convection known as thermocapillary convection. (2021-02-02)

Ural Federal University scientists discover ways to increase oil production efficiency
The study of the researchers of Ural Federal University Department of Technical Physics can make the oil production more efficient and anticipate consequences of environmental emergencies (2021-02-01)

Dewdrops on a spiderweb reveal the physics behind cell structures
Researchers in the laboratories of Princeton University scientists Joshua Shaevitz, Howard Stone, and Sabine Petry have discovered that surface tension drives the liquid-like protein TPX2 to form globules that nucleate the formation of branching microtubules during cell division. The paper detailing these discoveries appeared in the Jan 28 issue of the journal Nature Physics. (2021-01-29)

Ions in molten salts can go 'against the flow'
In a new article published in the scientific journal Communications Chemistry, a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected. In their research on molten salts, they were able to see that, in some cases, the ions in the salt mixture they were studying affect one another so much that they may even move in the ''wrong'' direction - that is, towards an electrode with the same charge. (2021-01-27)

A little soap simplifies making 2D nanoflakes
The right combination of surfactant, water and processing can maximize the quality of 2D hexagonal boron nitride for such products as antibacterial films. (2021-01-27)

Targeted health messaging needed in era of vaping, researchers say
Health authorities should develop targeted health messages for vaping product and e-liquid packaging to encourage smokers to switch from cigarettes to e-cigarettes and to prevent non-smokers from taking up vaping, a researcher at the University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand, says. (2021-01-26)

A professor from RUDN University developed new liquid crystals
A professor from RUDN University together with his Indian colleagues synthesized and studied new dibenzophenazine-based liquid crystals that could potentially be used in optoelectronics and solar panels. (2021-01-22)

Highly functional membrane developed for producing freshwater from seawater
Researchers at Kobe University's Research Center for Membrane and Film Technology have successfully developed a new desalination membrane by laminating a two-dimensional carbon material on to the surface of a porous polymer membrane. This membrane has the potential to perform highly efficient desalination because it is possible to control the gaps between its nanosheets and the charge on the nanosheets' surfaces. It is hoped that this research will contribute towards the implementation of futuristic desalination membranes. (2021-01-21)

Alcohols exhibit quantum effects
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues from the Russian Quantum Center revealed a significant role of nuclear quantum effects in the polarization of alcohol in an external electric field. The new research provides insight into the properties of liquid dielectrics. The core assumption of the model pertains to a novel understanding of dielectric polarization phenomena in polar liquids by means of nuclear quantum effects. (2021-01-19)

Healing ceramic electrolyte degraded by Li dendrite
Our research team has investigated the effect of post-annealing for healing Li garnet solid electrolyte degraded by the growth of Li dendrites. The ionic conductivity of the annealed solid electrolyte was slightly lower than that of the electrolyte before annealing but was retained above 10?4 S cm?1 at room temperature. The electrochemical results obtained indicate the possibility of reusing the solid electrolyte degraded by the growth of Li dendrites in another all-solid-state Li battery. (2021-01-18)

Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation
Researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona present a microscopic theory of lattice quantum droplets which explains the formation of a new type of quantum droplets that has been experimentally observed in ultracold atomic systems. (2021-01-15)

iCeMS makes highly conductive antiperovskites with soft anion lattices
A new structural arrangement of atoms shows promise for developing safer batteries made with solid materials. Scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) designed a new type of 'antiperovskite' that could help efforts to replace the flammable organic electrolytes currently used in lithium ion batteries. Their findings were described in the journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-12)

A safer, less expensive and fast charging aqueous battery
Researchers have developed a new battery anode that overcomes the limitations of lithium-ion batteries and offers a stable, high-performance battery using seawater as the electrolyte. (2021-01-11)

Detective work in theoretical physics
Physicists at the Universities of Münster and Düsseldorf in Germany have published a review article on the so-called dynamical density functional theory (DDFT). This is a method for describing systems consisting of a large number of interacting particles such as are found in liquids, for example. The 127-page article is published in the magazine Advances in Physics. (2020-12-29)

Controlling cardiac waves with light to better understand abnormally rapid heart rhythms
Over 300,000 people die each year in the US due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termination of rapid cardiac rhythm. (2020-12-22)

Nanoparticles could improve oil production
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University together with their colleagues from Novosibirsk studied the effect of nanoparticles on oil production efficiency. When added to the water that displaces oil from a reservoir, nanoparticles improve the separation of oil drops from mine rock and their washing to the surface. The work received a grant from the Russian Science Foundation, and an article about it was published in the Journal of Molecular Liquids. (2020-12-22)

Flexible and powerful electronics
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba has developed a method for optimizing the electrical properties of carbon-based conductors by turning them into an ionic gel. This work may open the way for cheap, highly efficient sensors that can be printed on flexible surfaces. (2020-12-16)

Researchers develop new combined process for 3D printing
Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage. The study was published in ''Advanced Materials Technologies''. (2020-12-16)

The un-appeal of banana: liquid e-cigarette flavorings measurably injure lungs
UC San Diego researchers report chemicals used for flavor in e-cigarette liquid negatively affect specialized proteins that support immune system. (2020-12-14)

Water on Mars not as widespread as previously thought, study finds
University of Arkansas scientists created planetwide maps of where water might be found on Mars. It is probably scarcer than previously thought, they concluded. (2020-12-10)

New and unexplored dimension in the study of protein-protein interactions
Cells accumulate glutamate and related molecules under stress, and so formation of high-order protein assemblies under these conditions has important biological implications. Specifically, this would represent a mechanism by which the presence of stressor compounds in the cell could control DNA replication. (2020-12-09)

Magnetic bacteria as micropumps
ETH scientists use magnetic bacteria to control liquids at the micro level. They are already thinking about using them in the human bloodstream for precision delivery of cancer drugs to a tumour. (2020-12-08)

HKU research team invents novel light-controlled contamination-free fluidic processor
A mechanical engineering research team at the University of Hong Kong has invented a novel light-controlled, contamination-free fluidic processor, which can serve as a useful tool to greatly reduce the risk of infection of front-line medical workers in testing virus or bacteria in big pandemics like the current COVID-19 pandemic, and to minimise the risk of contamination during the process. The new technology has been published in Science Advances in an article titled 'Photopyroelectric Microfluidics'. (2020-12-08)

Molecular pores for thought
Ultrathin porous films that can pluck out specific nanoscopic molecules could refine oil purification and drug development. (2020-12-06)

Ionic defect landscape in perovskite solar cells revealed
Joint research work between Chemnitz University of Technology and Technische Universität Dresden under Chemnitz leadership reveals ionic defect landscape in metal halide perovskites -- publication in renowned journal Nature Communications (2020-12-04)

Discoveries highlight new possibilities for magnesium batteries
Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of North America have reported a breakthrough in the development of magnesium batteries, allowing them to operate at room temperature and deliver a power density comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries. (2020-11-30)

TPU scientists develop eco-friendly hydrogel for agriculture
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University, in cooperation with the Czech colleagues have developed a new hydrogel for agriculture. It is meant to retain moisture and fertilizers in soil. The difference of the new hydrogel from other formulations is that it is made entirely of natural components and degrades in soil into nontoxic products to humans, animals, and plants. The research results are published in the Journal of Cleaner Production (IF: 7, 246; Q1). (2020-11-29)

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal ''Soft Matter'' as an ''Emerging Investigator'' article. (2020-11-26)

Using a soft crystal to visualize how absorbed carbon dioxide behaves in liquid
A team of scientists has succeeded in visualizing how carbon dioxide (CO2) behaves in an ionic liquid that selectively absorbs CO2. The finding is expected to help develop more efficient methods to capture CO2 in the atmosphere, one of the major factors causing global warming. (2020-11-25)

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are promising drug delivery tools but they struggle to get past the immune system's first line of defense: proteins in the blood serum that tag potential invaders. Now, Harvard researchers have developed an ionic forcefield that prevents proteins from binding to and tagging nanoparticles. In mouse experiments, nanoparticles coated with the ionic liquid survived significantly longer in the body than uncoated particles. (2020-11-25)

Building better diffusion models for active systems
Research published in EPJ E has led to new theories detailing how some unusual diffusion behaviours can be reproduced in generalised mathematical models. (2020-11-19)

Researchers prove water has multiple liquid states
When water reaches approximately -63 degrees centigrade it can separate into two liquid states, with one liquid being 20% more dense than the other. This is a fundamental finding that explains many of the anomalous properties of water at low temperatures. The finding has potential implications in low-temperature chemical and biochemical processes in aqueous environments. (2020-11-19)

Two liquids of water exist
Using x-ray lasers, researchers at Stockholm University have been able to follow the transformation between two distinct different liquid states of water, both being made of H2O molecules. At around -63 Centigrade the two liquids exist at different pressure regimes with a density difference of 20%. By rapidly varying the pressure before the sample could freeze, it was possible to observe one liquid changing into the other in real time. Their findings are published in the journal Science. (2020-11-19)

Dual brake on transport protein prevents cells from exploding
A high concentration of salt or sugar in the environment will dehydrate microorganisms and stop them from growing. To counter this, bacteria can increase their internal solute concentration. Scientists from the University of Groningen elucidated the structure of a transport protein OpuA, that imports glycine betaine to counter osmotic stress. The protein belongs to the well-known family of ABC transporters, but it has a unique structure and working mechanism. (2020-11-18)

Printed solid-state batteries
A Maryland-led team developed a new method of printing and sintering a variety of solid-state electrolyte thin films called ''printing and radiative heating'' (2020-11-18)

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