Current Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Events | Page 2

Current Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Events, Irritable Bowel Syndrome News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

Deep Longevity publishes an epigenetic aging clock of unprecedented accuracy
Longevity startup ''Deep Longevity'' has released a new high-accuracy methylation aging clock -- DeepMAge. It is a neural network that was trained and verified in a collection of >6,000 blood samples from 32 studies. The median absolute error of this aging clock is superior to other methylation clocks: 2.77 years in healthy people. The clock shows association with multiple age-related conditions, including cancer, dementia, and obesity. The authors aim to further develop DeepMAge into a generative model to simulate subcellular aging processes. (2020-12-08)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood. (2020-12-04)

New childhood dementia insight
Is the eye a window to the brain in Sanfilippo syndrome, an untreatable form of childhood-onset dementia, Australian researchers ask in a new publication. The findings of the NHMRC-funded project, just published in international journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, highlight the potential for using widely available retinal imaging techniques to learn more about brain disease and monitor treatment efficacy. (2020-12-01)

Vitamin D regulates calcium in intestine differently than previously thought
A Rutgers study has discovered that vitamin D regulates calcium in a section of the intestine that previously was thought not to have played a key role. The findings have important implications on how bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may disrupt calcium regulation. (2020-12-01)

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition. So-called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease of the heart that can occur during extreme stress events. Heart and hormone research teams in Bochum and Mannheim have now shown that there is apparently a strong link between the occurrence of Takotsubo syndrome and impaired thyroid function in patients. (2020-12-01)

Researchers have discovered new links between miscarriage and maternal genes
Researchers at the Estonian Genome Center at the University of Tartu described hitherto undiscovered associations between miscarriage and maternal genes, reveals a recent article published in the Nature Communication. (2020-11-25)

Specific bacterium in the gut linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have detected a connection between Brachyspira, a genus of bacteria in the intestines, and IBS -- especially the form that causes diarrhea. Although the discovery needs confirmation in larger studies, there is hope that it might lead to new remedies for many people with irritable bowel syndrome. (2020-11-25)

Breakthrough in studying the enzyme that ultimately produces fish odour syndrome
Fish odour syndrome (trimethylaminuria) is a debilitating disease, in which the liver cannot break down the smelly chemical trimethylamine which is produced by enzymes from bacteria residing in the gut leaving people with a fish like odour. Researchers from the University of Warwick are paving the way to prevent the syndrome after a breakthrough in studying the enzyme in the gut which produces trimethylamine. (2020-11-23)

Early signs of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down's syndrome
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the incidence and regional distribution of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the brains of people with Down's syndrome. The results can bring new possibilities for earlier diagnosis and preventive treatment of dementia. The study is published in Molecular Neurodegeneration. (2020-11-22)

Maraxilibat reduces debilitating itching in children with Alagille syndrome
On behalf of Childhood Liver Disease Research Network (ChiLDReN), Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine researchers report that prolonged treatment with Maraxilibat resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in debilitating itching (pruritus) and related quality of life outcomes in children with Alagille syndrome. The novel pharmacological approach addresses a major unfulfilled therapeutic need to control severe and relentless itching in pediatric patients with Alagille syndrome. (2020-11-19)

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure. This landmark discovery found a correlation between the clumping of RNA-binding proteins long linked to neurodegenerative disease and the aggregates of protein found in the heart tissue of patients with RBM20 dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-18)

A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
A team of scientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief. (2020-11-17)

New Fred Hutch-led trial shows no benefits of dairy foods for blood sugar regulation
Results from a new trial published by a team led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center suggests lower dairy intake may be beneficial for people with metabolic syndrome. (2020-11-16)

Study pinpoints target for managing inflammation, promoting tissue repair
Drugs that can manage the activity of a protein called BCAP could help the body repair IBD-related tissue damage caused by inflammation, according to experts at Cincinnati Children's. (2020-11-16)

Best practices for mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS, COVID-19
A team from pulmonary and critical care medicine at Michigan Medicine outlines 20 evidence-based practices shown to reduce time spent on a ventilator and death in patients with acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress -- conditions that have many overlaps with severe COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Single institution study finds high rates of cardiac complications in MIS-C
During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers at Children's National Hospital discovered that as many as one half of children diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory disease in children (MIS-C) at the hospital developed cardiac complications including coronary artery abnormalities, even when diagnosed and treated promptly. (2020-11-13)

Model helps predict which infants may develop NAS
A new Vanderbilt-designed prediction model may make it easier to determine which infants will go on to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns that occurs after exposure to opioids during pregnancy. (2020-11-12)

Genetic risk for fatal blood clots identified in IBD patients
In a retrospective study recently published in the journal Gastroenterology, Cedars-Sinai investigators found that a combination of rare and common genetic variants in some IBD patients significantly increased their risk of developing clot-causing thromboembolic diseases. (2020-11-11)

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species. (2020-11-10)

Tracking down the causes of heart attack
Heart attacks strike suddenly and have a range of different triggers. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) were able to uncover a further underlying cause. Studying arterial deposits (plaque) in patients with acute coronary syndrome, the researchers found that, in some patients, these were characterized by activated immune cells which, as a result of altered flow conditions within the vessel, had accumulated on the interior arterial wall, causing damage to the arterial lining. (2020-11-10)

People with inflammatory bowel disease still die earlier despite increase in life
A study comparing life expectancy of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and without found that, while life expectancy increased for both groups, people with IBD generally died sooner. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190976. (2020-11-09)

A novel finding on Kabuki syndrome, a rare genetic disease
It has a long time since the cause of the disease has been identified: mutations of KMT2D gene codify for MLL4, a protein involved in the regulation of chromatin, which is the complex of proteins and nucleic acids contained in the nucleus of cells. However, research still has a long way to go to identify therapeutic approaches. An Italian team, coordinated by the University of Trento, has taken a step forward in this direction (2020-11-09)

Attending an HBCU may protect Black students from later health problems
African Americans who attend Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs) may be at lower risk for health problems later in adulthood compared to African Americans who attend predominantly white institutions, a new study suggests. (2020-11-09)

Cleveland Clinic researchers identify melatonin as possible COVID-19 treatment
CLEVELAND - Results from a new Cleveland Clinic-led study suggest that melatonin, a hormone that regulates the sleep-wake cycle and is commonly used as an over-the-counter sleep aid, may be a viable treatment option for COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

COVID-19: Enzyme targeted by virus also influences gut inflammation
An enzyme that helps COVID-19 (coronavirus) infect the body also plays a role in inflammation and patient outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study led by Cedars-Sinai. The findings raise the possibility that anti-inflammatory drug therapies for IBD may aid recovery from coronavirus. (2020-11-05)

Down Syndrome-associated gene suppresses age-related corneal clouding
Down syndrome and hypercholesterolemia mouse models suggest that the DSCR-1 gene protects against abnormal cornea vascularization and associated blindness by suppressing oxidized LDL cholesterol production and downstream angiogenic signaling during chronic high cholesterol. While the neurological pathology of Down syndrome patients worsens with age, they are less susceptible to age-related vascular diseases. The responsible genes and mechanisms are not yet clear, but DSCR-1 is a strong candidate for a wide range of vascular diseases. (2020-11-05)

Delirium could be an early marker of COVID-19
Delirium accompanied by fever could be an early symptom of COVID-19. This is the main conclusion drawn by a scientific research review carried out by researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and published in the open access Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, which highlights the fact that, together with the loss of the senses of taste and smell and headaches that occur in the days prior to the manifestation of coughing and breathing difficulties, some patients also develop delirium. (2020-11-04)

Review finds almost 20% of COVID-19 patients only show gastrointestinal symptoms
Almost one in five patients with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a review of academic studies published in the journal Abdominal Radiology. The findings of the review suggest abdominal radiologists need to remain vigilant during the pandemic while imaging patients. (2020-11-03)

Possible triggers of autism symptoms and motor issues identified for several rare diseases
* Study identifies possible genetic triggers for debilitating symptoms of several rare diseases * These conditions, including Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, have few treatments * The results could eventually lead to more effective and personalised therapies (2020-10-29)

Next generation BRAF inhibitor cancer drug shows promise in early patient trial
A new drug designed to work on cancers with an altered BRAF gene has shown promise in an early patient trial presented at the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online. (2020-10-25)

Plant compound reduces cognitive deficits in mouse model of Down syndrome
The plant compound apigenin improved the cognitive and memory deficits usually seen in a mouse model of Down syndrome, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. Apigenin is found in chamomile flowers, parsley, celery, peppermint and citrus fruits. The findings raise the possibility that a treatment to lessen the cognitive deficits seen in Down syndrome could one day be offered to pregnant women whose fetuses have been diagnosed with Down syndrome through prenatal testing. (2020-10-23)

Easy home cancer test means patients can avoid hospital for colonoscopies
Findings from the largest international research study found that using FIT is almost 100% accurate at ruling out bowel cancer in patients with suspicious symptoms. During COVID, cancer diagnostics services were suspended and continue to be disrupted. Clinicians in London, along with NHS England, London region, agreed to rapidly implement the use of the same easy home test used in the bowel cancer screening programme, the FIT (faecal immunochemical test), to rule out cancer in people with suspected symptoms. (2020-10-23)

Discoveries reshape understanding of gut microbiome
The findings redefine how the so-called gut microbiome operates and how our bodies coexist with some of the 100 trillion bacteria that make it up. The discoveries could lead to new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and people who've had portions of their bowels removed due to conditions like colon cancer and ulcerative colitis. They also help explain why the use of antibiotics can create a multitude of problems in the digestive system. (2020-10-22)

Scientists take major step toward Angelman Syndrome gene therapy
Babies born with a faulty maternal copy of the UBE3A gene will develop Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with no cure and limited treatments. Now, for the first time, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine show that gene editing and gene therapy techniques can be used to restore UBE3A in human neuron cultures and treat deficits in an animal model of Angelman syndrome. (2020-10-21)

Study finds room for improvement when hospital patients transition to hospice care
Terminally ill patients referred to hospice care from a hospital setting tend to be on hospice for shorter periods than those who enter hospice while living at home or in a residential care facility. (2020-10-16)

Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity. (2020-10-15)

Tied to undiagnosed disease, aortic dissection in pregnancy proves difficult to predict
The 100th report out of the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection details the experiences of 29 women who faced this rare life-threatening complication while pregnant. (2020-10-14)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.