Current Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Events | Page 25

Current Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Events, Irritable Bowel Syndrome News Articles.
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Study shows association between gut microbes and brain structure in people with IBS
Research shows for the first time an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies. This suggests that signals generated by the brain can influence the composition of microbes residing in the intestine and that the chemicals in the gut can shape the human brain's structure. Also, the researchers gained insight into the connections among childhood trauma, brain development and gut microbiome composition. (2017-05-05)

Scientists gain insights into how Fragile X syndrome disrupts perception
A collaboration between scientists in Belgium, the United States, Norway, France and the UK has resulted in a study that sheds light on the neural mechanisms of Fragile X syndrome. This genetic disorder, which affects males twice as often as females due to males' single X chromosome, causes disruptions in the way neurons transmit information to each other. (2017-05-05)

For people with Down syndrome, varying test results can make it harder to get the right vision prescription
Even objective, automated vision testing -- using a device called an autorefractor -- gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a study in the May issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (2017-05-04)

Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'
Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing. (2017-05-04)

Buprenorphine cuts neonatal abstinence syndrome treatment length by nearly half
Findings of a phase 3 clinical trial being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting show that buprenorphine is just as safe and more effective than morphine when used to treat newborns suffering withdrawal symptoms after prenatal drug exposure. (2017-05-04)

Damaged genes considered high risk for developing tourette syndrome identified
Rearchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick, UC San Francisco, Massachusetts General Hospital, the University of Florida, Yale University and other institutions across the world identified one damaged, or mutant, 'high confidence' risk gene for Tourette's as well as three others they believe are genes whose mutation is a probable risk for the disorder. (2017-05-03)

New anti-rejection drug reduces weight gain and enhances outcomes for liver transplant recipients
Researchers have discovered that a new anti-rejection drug that is gentler on the kidneys after liver transplant also reduces weight gain, which is common after surgery and can lead to serious problems for transplant patients. (2017-05-02)

New data shows avocado consumers have improved nutrient intakes
A new analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, compared avocado consumers to non-consumers and found that consuming avocados may be associated with an overall better diet, higher intake of essential nutrients, lower body weight, lower Body Mass Index (BMI) and smaller waist circumference. (2017-05-02)

First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD
Cleveland Clinic doctors have published the first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder. 'We pioneered this procedure,' said Bo Shen, M.D., Medical Director, Cleveland Clinic's IBD Center. 'Our research shows that it is effective and can have advantages over other conventionally used treatments, such as medical therapy, balloon dilation and surgery.' Shen's study was featured in the April 2017 issue of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. (2017-04-28)

Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancer
Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds research published today in Lancet Oncology. (2017-04-27)

Fecal microbiota transplant is safe and effective for patients with ulcerative colitis
A single transplant of microbes contained in the stool of a healthy donor is a safe and effective way to increase diversity of good bacteria in the guts of patients with ulcerative colitis, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. The findings suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) might be an effective treatment for the disease, which causes inflammation and ulcers in the digestive tract. (2017-04-26)

Ingesting soy protein may ease severity of inflammatory bowel disease
A diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells. (2017-04-26)

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to imbalanced microbiome
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have discovered abnormal levels of specific gut bacteria related to chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, or ME/CFS, in patients with and without concurrent irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. Findings are published in the journal Microbiome. (2017-04-26)

UVA finds way to speed search for cancer cures dramatically
A new technique will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease. (2017-04-25)

Stem cells help researchers identify neuronal defects causing Angelman syndrome
Researchers at UConn Health used stem cells derived from patients with Angelman syndrome to identify the underlying neuronal defects that cause the rare neurogenetic disorder, an important step in the ongoing search for potential treatments for Angelman and a possible cure. (2017-04-24)

Guts and glory for RMIT smart pills
Australian researchers have successfully completed phase one human trials of ingestible capsules that have the potential to revolutionise the prevention and diagnosis of gut disorders and diseases. (2017-04-24)

Drug-resistant bacteria in patients' urine or stools raise risk of drug-resistant sepsis
People who have recently been found to have drug-resistant bacteria in their urine or stool samples have a greatly increased risk of developing a bloodstream infection that is also resistant to certain antibiotics, according to a study presented at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. (2017-04-22)

Study identifies a distinct type of common gastrointestinal bleeding
In an article published online on April 21, 2017 by the Journal of Investigative Medicine, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere have identified a unique bleeding syndrome associated with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The investigators have coined a term for the syndrome: acute on chronic bleeding. Clinicians should be aware of the association of this presentation with cirrhosis and portal hypertension for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. (2017-04-21)

'Connshing syndrome' named as a new cause of high blood pressure
Research led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease. (2017-04-21)

Using venomous proteins to make insect milkshakes
In a just-published paper in the journal PLOS Pathogens, Adler Dillman, an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside and several collaborators found that nematodes secrete a deadly cocktail of proteins to kill many insects that damage crops. The finding overturns a long-held belief that it is exclusively bacteria, working in conjunction with nematodes, that kill the insects. (2017-04-20)

Researchers unlock an immunity 'black box'
Mapping the biological machinery of the inflammatory skin disease neutrophilic dermatosis offers multiple targets for treating inflammatory disorders. (2017-04-18)

Cytokine controls immune cells that trigger inflammatory bowel disease, study finds
A certain cytokine, or small protein that helps cells communicate during immune responses, can control whether immune cells promote or suppress inflammatory bowel disease, a finding that could lead to new treatments, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2017-04-18)

Inflammatory bowel diseases on the rise in very young Canadian children
Canada has among the highest rates of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, and the number of children under five years old being diagnosed increased by 7.2 percent every year between 1999 to 2010. (2017-04-18)

High-fat, high-carb diet a cause of osteoarthritis
Saturated fat is a prime suspect in the onset of osteoarthritis after QUT scientists found it changed the composition of cartilage, particularly in the weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. (2017-04-18)

Study identifies a genetic link to susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory bowel disease
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterized by chronic relapsing inflammation of the gut, is a common problem in the industrialized world. However, how IBD develops remains unknown. There is currently no cure and treatment options are costly and limited to alleviating symptoms. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reveals that the Cd14 gene is a protective factor in experimental inflammatory bowel disease by enhancing the intestinal barrier function. (2017-04-13)

Researchers reveal developmental mechanisms behind rare bone marrow disorder
Myelodysplastic syndrome is an umbrella term used to describe disorders characterized by the bone marrow's inability to produce normal blood cells. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have found that a mutation in a specific tumor suppressor gene is one possible reason why children with a very rare genetic disorder develop myelodysplastic syndrome. Results from this research have been published in the current edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2017-04-12)

Avocados may help combat the metabolic syndrome
A new review investigates the effects of avocados on different components of metabolic syndrome, which is a clustering of risk factors including high blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure, and body mass index. These risk factors lead to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. (2017-04-10)

Deep brain stimulation decreases tics in young adults with severe Tourette syndrome
A surgical procedure called deep brain stimulation that sends electrical impulses to a specific area of the brain reduces the 'tics,' or involuntary movements and vocal outbursts, experienced by young adults with severe cases of Tourette syndrome, according to new research from NYU Langone Medical Center. (2017-04-07)

Urine test may be able to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children with Down syndrome
A study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators raises the possibility of identifying children with Down syndrome who may also have obstructive sleep apnea without the need for expensive and inconvenient sleep studies. (2017-04-06)

UCLA researchers discover a new cause of high plasma triglycerides
People with hypertriglyceridemia often are told to change their diet and lose weight. But a high-fat diet isn't necessarily the cause for everyone with the condition. UCLA researchers have discovered a subset of people with hypertriglyceridemia whose bodies produce autoantibodies -- immune-response molecules that attack their own proteins -- causing high levels of triglycerides in the blood. (2017-04-05)

Probiotics benefit in schizophrenia shaped by yeast infections
In a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast infections. (2017-04-05)

Yoga helps patients with ulcerative colitis
Patients with ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, often relapse at times of stress. In a clinical trial of 77 ulcerative colitis patients who were in clinical remission but were experiencing reduced quality of life, those assigned to 12 supervised 90-minute weekly sessions of yoga had a greater increase in quality of life and reduced activity of their colitis compared with those who were given written self-care advice. (2017-04-05)

Inhaled corticosteroids may raise women's risk of the metabolic syndrome
Use of inhaled corticosteroids in women is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, researchers have found. Results from a large Dutch study will be presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. (2017-04-04)

New report links early life antibiotic use to inflammatory gut diseases in adulthood
A new research report in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology involving mice shows that antibiotic use very early in life that alters the normal development/growth of gut bacteria, may contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease, and potentially other inflammatory diseases like asthma and multiple sclerosis. (2017-04-03)

Experts present advances in treating neurological disease at the INS 13th World Congress
Experts will present diverse advances in neuromodulation from May 27 to June 1, 2017 at the 13th World Congress of the International Neuromodulation Society in Edinburgh, Scotland. (2017-03-30)

Brain's role in Tourette tics simulated in new computational model
A new computer-based brain simulation shows that motor tics in Tourette syndrome may arise from interactions between multiple areas of the brain, rather than a single malfunctioning area, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-03-30)

Internet crystal ball can predict risk of heart disease, diabetes, study finds
An online metabolic calculator predicts people's risk of developing heart disease and diabetes more accurately than traditional methods, a large new study has found. The tool's creator hopes it will prompt people to make lifestyle changes that would spare them the suffering and expense of avoidable illnesses. (2017-03-30)

Gale and Ira Drukier Prize in Children's Health Research awarded to allergist-immunologist
Dr. Joshua Milner, an allergist and immunologist who has made key discoveries into the origin of previously unidentified disorders that affect children and families, has been awarded the second annual Gale and Ira Drukier Prize in Children's Health Research, Weill Cornell Medicine announced today. (2017-03-29)

Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hard
High concentrations of the stress hormone, Cortisol, in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy on patients with Cushing's Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress. (2017-03-28)

Case Western Reserve University researchers turn urine into research tools
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a breakthrough technique to harvest cells directly from urine, and grow them into durable, clinically relevant stem cells to study Down syndrome. (2017-03-28)

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